Personality Cafe banner

I'm a HSP and I am a...

  • 1w9

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 1w2

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 2w1

    Votes: 2 18.2%
  • 2w3

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 3w2

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 3w4

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 4w3

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 4w5

    Votes: 1 9.1%
  • 5w4

    Votes: 4 36.4%
  • 5w6

    Votes: 1 9.1%
  • 6w5

    Votes: 1 9.1%
  • 6w7

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 7w6

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 7w8

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 8w7

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 8w9

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 9w8

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 9w1

    Votes: 2 18.2%
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Banned
INFP 9w1 sp/so
Joined
·
2,470 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I've recently learned about HSPs/"Highly Sensitive Person"s and first of all I definitely think there needs to be more awareness of it as it's a HUGE factor in not just the personality but also the lives of many people, so that's the secondary purpose of this thread. There have probably been threads about it in the past but they're likely buried, so here's a little bump for the topic. But the main point is that I'm curious to see what kind of correlation there is between enneatypes and HSP.

It doesn't seem to be well known at all outside of psychology circles so for those unaware, the short of it is that a HSP is a person with a very high sensitivity to stimuli of any kind, just under 20% of people are HSPs and it's hereditary, it's a different brain structure inherited from parents and it affects you from birth. This includes physical, sensory and emotional stimuli. You have a particularly high focus on your physical and mental feelings, in other words feel just about everything very "deeply", and this comes with a laundry list of pros and cons that have a humongous effect on your personality and likely the way you live your life. I've only just discovered it so I'm probably not the best person to explain it well, so here's a few articles. Those of you who aren't familiar with it, have a read and you should be able to work out pretty easily if you are one or not:

"The Highly Sensitive Person"
"24 Signs of a Highly Sensitive Person"
"You're Not Weird; You're Just an HSP"
"The Secret Life of a Highly Sensitive Person"

I'm one and learning about it has been mind-blowing. Really makes you feel so grounded an so much less weird to learn about.

But onto the main point, for those of you who are HSPs, what is your enneatype and wing? Some are likely to be more represented than others but some I'm very curious about. I'm a 9w1 myself. I haven't set up a poll on here before so gimme a sec if it isn't working when you click into here...

Feel free to share your experiences with either being an HSP or knowing HSP's down below too, let's breathe some more life into the topic.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dare

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
I might be an HSP, but I'm not really sure. Some of the things mentioned in the links describe me to a T, others are the opposite. I took an online test one time and I think I was 4 checkboxes away
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
642 Posts
5w6 sp/so

I would consider myself to be highly sensitive, especially to environments where there are too many people, noise, extremely bright places... it makes me feel sick.
I also feel really uncomfortable when I need to talk about myself or my interests (basic self-introduction) and I am terrible at dealing with emotions in a practical way.
 

·
Banned
INFP 9w1 sp/so
Joined
·
2,470 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I would consider myself to be highly sensitive, especially to environments where there are too many people, noise, extremely bright places... it makes me feel sick.
I also feel really uncomfortable when I need to talk about myself or my interests (basic self-introduction) and I am terrible at dealing with emotions in a practical way.
Strangely enough I'm worse with dimly lit places than with bright places. I have to have lights on everywhere or my eyes feel really really strained, even in broad daylight sometimes.

Totally feel you on the latter parts though. But I think feeling uncomfortable with talking about yourself is a common trait of social anxiety so it might be a mix of social anxiety and high sensitivity you're experiencing. Or I could be wrong. But I know exactly what you mean though, there's the feeling that it'll bore the people you're talking and it feels really self-absorbed for some reason, even in basic conversation where it's expected of you. It's one of the reasons I really don't like trying to talk to people.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
642 Posts
Strangely enough I'm worse with dimly lit places than with bright places. I have to have lights on everywhere or my eyes feel really really strained, even in broad daylight sometimes.
Dim lights make me feel comfortable and at peace and I get a headache if the lights are too bright, to be honest lol.

Totally feel you on the latter parts though. But I think feeling uncomfortable with talking about yourself is a common trait of social anxiety so it might be a mix of social anxiety and high sensitivity you're experiencing.
I could have social anxiety. Probably do, but I'm not 100% sure.

But I know exactly what you mean though, there's the feeling that it'll bore the people you're talking and it feels really self-absorbed for some reason, even in basic conversation where it's expected of you. It's one of the reasons I really don't like trying to talk to people.
Expectations. We are expected to pretend we are interested in someone else's life, but not too interested and expected to pretend that our lives are interesting enough to talk about, but not to the point where we are bragging about it.

Sometimes I feel like I'm trying too hard just to seem both polite and genuine; sometimes I feel like I'm not trying hard enough and others think I am arrogant or rude because I suck at interacting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
I'm 5w4. I just took this test Are You Highly Sensitive? – The Highly Sensitive Person and scored 21/27 so, yes I'm still a HSP (above 14 is considered a HSP).

The main things I don't have from that list: being observed doesn't bother me (I have no performance or social anxiety), I don't startle easy and rather than avoid violent tv shows I actually prefer them (action movies anyway, I only look away if it gets gruesome). It's interesting that the questions expect you to be a 'nervous nelly' type. I'm very calm naturally (while still being highly sensitive). I also like to experience deliberate over-stimulation occasionally for fun (I assume this is my SX dominance getting an intensity fix).

The main thing I'm too sensitive towards is loud sounds. I don't like 'noise-makers'. I also strongly dislike bright artificial light, people interrupting me and having too much going on around me. I find it curious that they correlate high sensitivity with conscientiousness. I am highly conscientious, I hate choas. I'm also sensitive to certain types of pain which I dislike about myself unfortunately.

The benefit I find to being a HSP is the depth and delicateness of perception -- I notice subtleties, take pleasure in 'fine' things and have the capacity to 'feel deeply'. The downside is having to set my life up in a compensating way (with an ability to control sensory input).

When I looked into enneagram + HSP correlations before I came across material that suggests while any type can be a HSP, it's 4s and 5s that tend to be the most frequent enneagrams of HSP which makes sense when you look at the questions they ask on a HSP test (which seem very 4/5 ish in nature). It's been suggested that there is a correlation between INXX and being HSP (as there is between INXX and enneagrams 4 & 5). It's interesting to read about the biological basis to HSP.
 

·
Banned
INFP 9w1 sp/so
Joined
·
2,470 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
It sounds like you're experiencing the sensory sensitivity much more so than the emotional sensitivity, which I didn't expect to hear but that makes sense. I'd imagine it's especially likely for HSP's to suffer social anxiety so it's possible some of the questions might be referring to people experiencing both. Nearly all of the points described me perfectly and I do have social anxiety. Only one I didn't so much agree with is same as yours, the violent films one. I do have to look away from films like Saw and Hostel sometimes but that's not to say I don't enjoy them. Morbid curiosity is a wonderful thing. Vanilla violence though I have no problem with.

I know what you mean though, I love the side of HSP that lets us experience things on a deeper level. My friends never seem to get as "into" things as me and now I finally know why. I'd love to know if the rest of you have experienced the same thing. The connection we can have with things we love is something else, man. I wouldn't trade it for the world.

I'm expecting to see a high representation for 2w1, 4 and 9w1, but I'm surprised to hear 5 is a common one too. The descriptions make it sound like 5's tend to have a tighter reign over their feelings. Maybe you guys are just better at hiding them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dulcinea and Dare

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
...The descriptions make it sound like 5's tend to have a tighter reign over their feelings. Maybe you guys are just better at hiding them.
I've read a lot about fives and while the stereotype has us as cold, many describe us as sensitive. I enjoyed reading a description once that likened us to turtles born without a shell (who therefore need to withdraw/seek shelter to survive). The general theory on 5s is that we only reveal our feelings/sensitivity to a few close people. It's said the sx variant is the "emotionally sensitive" one.

I see myself as emotionally sensitive but only in the context of a romantic relationship (I'm sx/sp). Outside of that, for the most part, I can control how much I allow things to affect me emotionally (stereotypical INTJ in this regard). It's not as easy for me to shut off my sensitivity to sensory things in my environment (unless I've reached a flow state or am lost deep in thought). Although they can be related; ugly curtains 'hurt' me, lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,970 Posts
5w6 sp/so

I would consider myself to be highly sensitive, especially to environments where there are too many people, noise, extremely bright places... it makes me feel sick.
I also feel really uncomfortable when I need to talk about myself or my interests (basic self-introduction) and I am terrible at dealing with emotions in a practical way.
Strangely enough I'm worse with dimly lit places than with bright places. I have to have lights on everywhere or my eyes feel really really strained, even in broad daylight sometimes.

Totally feel you on the latter parts though. But I think feeling uncomfortable with talking about yourself is a common trait of social anxiety so it might be a mix of social anxiety and high sensitivity you're experiencing. Or I could be wrong. But I know exactly what you mean though, there's the feeling that it'll bore the people you're talking and it feels really self-absorbed for some reason, even in basic conversation where it's expected of you. It's one of the reasons I really don't like trying to talk to people.
This is why grocery shopping is a nightmare for me. Bright lights, too much choice, too many people (and the interacting with cashiers and trying to get all my items away into bags quick enough lol!!). I get dizzy and out of breath and emotionally drained afterwards.

My mum took me to be tested for autism when I was quite young (maybe 5) - 4 of my male relatives have aspergers and my mum was worried I could too because I was very, very shy. I hung around adults and I always got upset with loud noises (man I remember throwing pillows at the window when it rained heavily because it was very upsetting to me - I find it quite comforting now..). However, the therapist didn't believe I had autism because the social aspect of it was because I was deathly shy and really wanted to fit in and be friends, I just was too scared and afraid of rejection even back then. What the therapist suggested to her was sensory processing disorder though this is never brought up when I'm having anything medical so I don't know if they even take that seriously.


What I find is that I don't like loud noises I can't control - so I can enjoy loud music if I have controlled the volume but not if someone else has. I can get really irritated with too much noise. For example, the other week I was working with a lady who just spoke, spoke and spoke. I was literally ready to cry after a few hours because it was too much for me and I knew it was too much for the disabled person we were caring for and I could just feel the tension in the air and it was horrible. I got home from that shift and slept for hours because it was so taxing for me.


As for emotion hm, as I say I was always a very sensitive, shy kid and I've described myself as being an emotional sponge at times, mostly soaking up the negative atmospheres. I've really learnt to detach myself from my emotions as I've gotten older but I still get upset easily when others are or feel their joy when they're happy. It's probably easier to list movies I haven't cried at :tongue:. Arguments can affect me for a really long time even if they apologized straight away (and I believe their apology). I can just feel quite down and be a bit withdrawn around that person for a while even though I try to keep my happy face on. I can't hide when I'm upset even if I try, it's just written in my face and my body language.
 

·
Banned
INFP 9w1 sp/so
Joined
·
2,470 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
snip snip
Ohhh dude. I get you. I used to be exactly the same but I find that as long as I put on the facade of someone who knows what they're doing it works well as a shield from all the pressure. But then I realise I have no idea where the thing I'm looking for is and then the panic seeps in. Eep. I relate so hard on the whole of your second paragraph too, man. My mum told me recently that my stepdad thinks I have autism but I don't think I do. Having discovered HSP I'm pretty sure it covers the reasons why he thinks so. I thought recently that I had avoidant personality disorder but I spoke to a therapist and she said it's likely just social anxiety disorder so that covers all the bases. I had a google of sensory processing disorder though and it sounds like the reasons for thinking so might have ties to HSP too. Not sure how severe it is for you though.
(edit: Wait I snipped the quote too soon and thought you'd said that it was another thing the therapist agreed you probably didn't have! Sorry!)

Loud noises you can't control is a great way to phrase it, I never thought of it that way. Screaming kids are agony. And loud construction. And sirens! Fire alarms! Ooowww. That sucks about the job though. Sounds like the kind of job where there'd be a lot of pressure to not mess up too. Have you ever worked in a contact centre? If you haven't then my god, don't do it. For people like us it's just.. wow. I've never been so miserable in my life. Phones are bad. Don't use them.

And your last point, dude, get out of my head. I can have the tiniest argument with someone and it's like oh god, they hate me now, what have I done, I can never be friends with them again. And I don't know how to talk to them again until they start acting normal again. Something I related to to an insane degree when I was looking into HSP that seems related, do you also find that the tiniest upset in your day involving people can ruin your whole day? Making up examples feels awkward but say like, a shopkeeper has a bad attitude with you while you're buying something and makes you feel small, or like, someone makes a comment about you to their friend within earshot of you and laugh at your expense? These sorts of things other people seem to brush off immediately but they always play on my head for WEEKS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,970 Posts
Ohhh dude. I get you. I used to be exactly the same but I find that as long as I put on the facade of someone who knows what they're doing it works well as a shield from all the pressure. But then I realise I have no idea where the thing I'm looking for is and then the panic seeps in. Eep. I relate so hard on the whole of your second paragraph too, man. My mum told me recently that my stepdad thinks I have autism but I don't think I do. Having discovered HSP I'm pretty sure it covers the reasons why he thinks so. I thought recently that I had avoidant personality disorder but I spoke to a therapist and she said it's likely just social anxiety disorder so that covers all the bases. I had a google of sensory processing disorder though and it sounds like the reasons for thinking so might have ties to HSP too. Not sure how severe it is for you though.
(edit: Wait I snipped the quote too soon and thought you'd said that it was another thing the therapist agreed you probably didn't have! Sorry!)

Loud noises you can't control is a great way to phrase it, I never thought of it that way. Screaming kids are agony. And loud construction. And sirens! Fire alarms! Ooowww. That sucks about the job though. Sounds like the kind of job where there'd be a lot of pressure to not mess up too. Have you ever worked in a contact centre? If you haven't then my god, don't do it. For people like us it's just.. wow. I've never been so miserable in my life. Phones are bad. Don't use them.

And your last point, dude, get out of my head. I can have the tiniest argument with someone and it's like oh god, they hate me now, what have I done, I can never be friends with them again. And I don't know how to talk to them again until they start acting normal again. Something I related to to an insane degree when I was looking into HSP that seems related, do you also find that the tiniest upset in your day involving people can ruin your whole day? Making up examples feels awkward but say like, a shopkeeper has a bad attitude with you while you're buying something and makes you feel small, or like, someone makes a comment about you to their friend within earshot of you and laugh at your expense? These sorts of things other people seem to brush off immediately but they always play on my head for WEEKS.
If I've had a bad week I sometimes just get click and collect - you do your shopping online then collect it. But I find the machines hard to use and then you have to wait for someone to take out your groceries and watch you pick them up/put them in your car and AHH! When I get my own place I think I might just get grocery delivery.

I do also have social anxiety to a degree, in that I had it real bad in my teens but now that I'm in my 20's and I work I've learnt to deal with it.

Yeah basically, I mean, I have my headphones really loud and my car radio on really loud. But if I'm in someone elses car and it's loud (even when it's no louder than I have it in my car) it really distress me. I guess it ties into anxiety? Like, I'm also claustrophobic because it's that fear of not being able to get out or control my environment. When my social anxiety was really bad I'd sit near a bathroom or door for example at a restaurant/event so I knew if it got too much I always had somewhere I could easily escape to. The only way I've been able to deal with these sort of things is by putting myself into situations where I can't escape and learn that it's okay. I can't control my environment all the time :tongue:.

I work with disabled people, usually one to one but I have a service where it's 2 disabled ladies and 2 staff on at all time. They are usually between 6 and 8 hour shifts and usually you're kept too busy to chat too long anyway, so in general it's okay. As you can imagine, I work with a lot of ESFJs who can chat, chat, chat but regular staff have learnt when to quieten down for the clients - for example, if they're in a bad mood or they're tired. We get agency staff to cover shifts and they do not know.. This can lead to almost breakdowns for me because I can feel the tension in the air from one of our clients (I'd guess she's an ISTJ) and I soak it up and anticipate her getting angry and I also have to plan in my head the order I'm going to do everything to make sure everything goes as smoothly as possible with the least amount of upset from the clients. Going on a tangent here but yep, call centres would be a big no for me, I HATE making calls. House hunting was stressful because they like to call you and arrange visits. MY EMAIL IS THERE FOR A REASON.

Yeah, what happened to me was I'd gone into work and I was reading the handover. I questioned a little bit to my colleague who was in an irritated mood due to personal issues. She snapped at me and then left. I continued doing my job but I felt really quite upset about it. She text me literally 10 minutes later to apologize and explained she'd had a bad morning blahblah. I said it was fine I understood. Our next shift together she apologized again but I still for the next couple weeks felt sort of bad, even though I didn't feel angry at her. This was me for the next couple weeks:



Also similarly, even if I've snapped at someone, I feel terrible about it for weeks whilst they've probably gotten over it after a few hours lol.
 

·
Banned
INFP 9w1 sp/so
Joined
·
2,470 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I'm normally okay as long as the self-checkouts work. When they're not working and I have to talk to the person at the till that's when things get real. I feel you on the being watched part though, do you get self-conscious over like really weird things? I can't even talk to my friends in public places because I hate the thought of people listening in on me. I hate being the first person to leave a room too. Brrrr. Blending in is key. It's how we do.

I can be initially startled by other peoples' loud music but if I'm in their house or car or something then I get over it fairly quickly. If it's someone on the bus and there's someone playing music out loud on their phone or something like that though it really bugs me. If you have a fear of not being able to control your environment though I'd imagine that probably plays into it. That's good that you've managed to get over it though. I've heard of claustrophobes whose lives get ruined by it so ya've done good.

Oooft... that sounds like fun. The fact that you're able to easily sense the tension in your clients is pretty textbook HSP from what I've read though, so even if it ruins your mood it's still a rare ability you can take pride in. A job that deals with caring for people like yours sounds perfect for you even if it can be stressful at times, you'll be able to care for your clients in a way that other people won't. There probably won't be many other people who will know to plan ahead when the mood atmosphere starts to sour. Oh god, tell me about it. My sister's the worst for it. I'll text her a simple yes/no question I need an answer to and seconds later my phone will ring and it's like WHY. WHYYYY?! There aren't many things in this world that make me feel the sheer terror of the sound of my phone ringing. I'll be hearing that vibration in my nightmares.

Ah man, that sucks. I feel you on that too though, in fact that's one of my biggest gripes with my brain. Like if there's been a single moment in time where I think I've annoyed somebody that keeps me awake at night man, even if we're fine now. I'll also occasionally suddenly remember times from even like ten or so years ago out of nowhere and that's an instant bad mood. Doesn't matter that everything's fine now, that happened once, brain no likey. It's always nice to hear there's other people experiencing the same thing with things like this though, it makes you feel less alone in a way.

(Edit: By the way to anyone reading this, is the poll still open or is it closed? I checked the thread logged out on my phone earlier and it said it was closed, I thought it might have just been because I was logged out so couldn't vote but there doesn't seem to be any more votes coming in.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,015 Posts
Scored 20/27 on that test that @Dare linked. Like her, I experience sensory sensitivity more often than emotional sensitivity. I'd guess that the Withdrawn types (4, 5, 9) are the most likely to be HSP.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top