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Discussion Starter #1
Let's say a person is walking down a dark alley, and he suddenly encounters a jump-scare. Let's take a real-life situation I had as an example. I was walking down the street at night, and then noticed a black cat jumping over a high fence. As I continued to proceed forward along the fence, suddenly I noticed a very huge shadow with the corner of my eye, and for some reason my brain's instant interpretation of that huge shadow was: "It's a huge mutant cat (tiger-sized) that's jumping at me and will tear me to shreds."

My instant reaction (as hilarious as it was even to myself postfactum) was to jump out of my walking pace into the air and land into a fighting pose towards the shadow. I was instantly prepared to defend myself physically, without even fully realizing what the hell was I up against.

But given how different people react differently to such "jump-scares", as we know the fight-or-flight response is different from person to person, do function stacks somehow impact these responses?

Person A: would just freeze up in the spot (maybe his instincual way of playing dead)
Person B: would instantly start running away
Person C: would jump into battle
 

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Why do we have to live in a society that represses our fighting spirit?
 

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Imo it is instinctive more than anything else, but I suppose certain cognitive alertness towards spatial changes would play a role. I am either oblivious to them or overly alerted by jumpscares. I would expect most people to be though since there are probably some biological features we share, and this alertness to environment would be one of them.

As for the different responses, as far as I could think of, they are caused mostly by actual! threats in the environment...

A: would just freeze up in the spot (maybe his instincual way of playing dead)
In situations where I felt threatened by a group with no conceivable espace.... coz there is no point.

B: would instantly start running away.
as above, except that there was an escape.

C: would jump into battle
In situations where facing just one adversary, the initial reaction is physical self-defense, but usually I have not realized what I am doing and why exactly, it is just pure action or reaction rather...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
As for the different responses, as far as I could think of, they are caused mostly by actual! threats in the environment...

A: would just freeze up in the spot (maybe his instincual way of playing dead)
In situations where I felt threatened by a group with no conceivable espace.... coz there is no point.

B: would instantly start running away.
as above, except that there was an escape.

C: would jump into battle
In situations where facing just one adversary, the initial reaction is physical self-defense, but usually I have not realized what I am doing and why exactly, it is just pure action or reaction rather...
I would disagree with this, as you're altering the situation for each response.

Here's another more simple example to explain what I'm alluding to: a person is crossing the road, and then he suddenly notices that a car is speeding towards him with no sign of stopping.
It is known that such situations have 2 types of victims: one type will freeze on the spot from fear, and lose his ability to jump out of the car's way (even though he has several seconds to do so), while the second type will jump out of the way instantly.

There are simply people who instantly jump into action as they are met with a sudden threat, and those who are stupefied by it and unable to move/react physically.
 

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I would disagree with this, as you're altering the situation for each response.
Obviously, because not all responses make sense in all situations. Why would I try to flee when there is no chance of me getting away? It might even turn out worse than it already is.
Here's another more simple example to explain what I'm alluding to: a person is crossing the road, and then he suddenly notices that a car is speeding towards him with no sign of stopping.
It is known that such situations have 2 types of victims: one type will freeze on the spot from fear, and lose his ability to jump out of the car's way (even though he has several seconds to do so), while the second type will jump out of the way instantly.

There are simply people who instantly jump into action as they are met with a sudden threat, and those who are stupefied by it and unable to move/react physically.
I do not think it can be proven conclusively, except with people who have very clear patterns of responses and reactions to perceived threats (aka. as you say "types"). But it is not at all frequent that a person has simply one response to everything threatening as much depends on what is perceived as a threat, assessing the risk compared to the actual danger in the situation etc.
 
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