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All knowledge I collect I believe will have and must have a practical outcome. It must take its place in the world at some point. It must be working to a whole. It must build towards something, even if that something is "unknowable".


  • Does this resonate with you?
  • Do you really collect knowledge just for the sake of it, or do you secretly hope to breathe life into it?

I believe that this may be Fe at work with Ti in an optimal way. It's combative to the "sloth" mentality. It comes out in a different way to Te, but does fire the drive towards productivity.


Video: NFGeeks interviews an INTP
 

 

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Da fuck is practicality? Just because I want to learn the PRINCIPLES of building doomsday devices doesn't mean I want to actually USE them.*

*I am required by law to say this if I want to keep my funding.
 

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Awesome question @Ista!

Hm. A bit of both. When I am not looking to find a specific bit of knowledge, I am always open to new knowledge.. Whether its sorted to the front or back of the filing cabinet.. is dependent on how practical it is.
 

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I don't. Sometimes I just want to know how stuff works, just for the heck of it. I like to understand the world.

However this can backfire.

Having cut up moose in all manner of ways I of course took the chance to study some anatomy. In the past two weeks I've learnt a lot about how muscles sit, how tendons work, how joints works, how stuff is held together etc.

This knowledge it turns out my brain can use to apply to other animals, among those human, to figure out how to (probably)"disassemble" these. This was not anything I aimed for nor was it anything I wanted to know or will have any use of, except with reindeer which are like small moose.
 

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Necrothreading a bit; I pretty much agree, but I'm not sure I value knowledge by practical outcomes, exactly. Usually it's a level of abstraction somewhere short of practicality.

One of the things I value is "clarity," for example, by which I mean understanding a particular set of ideas (how they fit together, what they imply), what this tells you about the 2% of the world these ideas meaningfully address, but more than that understanding your own interests with that 2% of the world, and how to act to satisfy those interests. It's about understanding how things work, untangling what you want, and making them play well together. So if I think that a particular set of ideas or body of knowledge or set of skills can contribute to clarifying things for myself, or for others, I'll be motivated to learn it anyway, even if I can't yet identify a particular practical outcome that'll result.

(It seems "clarifying things for others" doesn't usually mean explaining things to people -- rather it's about listening and asking the right questions, or reflecting back what you've heard with the issues subtly reframed. Which is a lot harder than I wish it were. :/)

Anyway, I guess my concern is that trying to connect things to practical or tangible outcomes might lead to undervaluing knowledge that can serve some purpose, but one you don't yet see. (Maybe this improves with experience, but trying to track the real world too closely usually gets me lost. :p) So I think there's room for a level of abstraction somewhere short of that real world -- of sorts of purposes you might like your knowledge to serve, broad categories that don't require you to attend too assiduously to what's happening in the moment -- with which to motivate the things you learn.

(And about that video: something about the interviewer's immense personal warmth, and yet also the intense interest in generalizing about INTPs and INTJs as a whole with one sitting right next to him, rubbed me the wrong way. "Alright, well let's talk about weaknesses then!" *chuckle*)
 
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