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Discussion Starter #1
INFPs can be really indecisive when it comes to choosing educational pathways. Should I go to college? What major should I pick? Should I drop out instead? What should I learn next? Are INFPs good in sciences?

I think a good way of answering such questions is to seek out people who are already learning whatever it is we're consider taking, to get some pointers about the real deal from those who are actually walking the walk.

This is what this thread is all about. I'd like to ask all of you, INFPs, who are studying something — it doesn't matter whether you're doing it in college or as an autodidact — to contribute by sharing your experience.

Write it any way you like: make it shorter, make it longer, make it plain descriptive, or give it an artistic touch, but try to answer the following questions:

But please try to answer the following questions:

  • What is it you're currently learning?
  • How long have you been doing it?
  • What is it all about? Other people may have the wrong impression of your discipline, so what is your learning experience really like?
  • Are you enrolled in an institution or learning on your own?
  • How do you feel about it? Is it fulfilling? Are you happy with it?
  • What advice would you have to those wishing to follow on your footsteps?
No rules here, just an orientation: if at all possible, write about your current experience, about what you're studying right now, instead of remembering something else you've done in the past.

Thank you very much.
 

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Asking people won't do much good. Because INFPs are the type who would throw away the their lives willingly if you've found their calling, but endlessly procrastinate if they're stuck in things they don't enjoy. While sure, that's kinda the same for everybody across all types, but this seems to be far more pronounced and extreme in the case of INFPs.

So the best remedy is actually, asking yourself. What are YOU going to do?

If you just want a point of reference, let me tell you a story to break the ice a bit:

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There was this boy who came from a land far away. He enrolled into the local school, and had jump 1 year above his intended year in order to save costs. Maybe it is due to that he was from another land, or maybe it was because of his relative young age compared to everybody in the class, he had trouble keeping up with his fellow classmates. He didn't know anybody, he didn't make many friends, though his studies was alright but he never felt belonged, and he was for the most part, lonely. Highschool years was a very short time to him, to him it almost ended in a flash. However with some luck and occasional happiness that served as his pillar, he was able to successfully and safely reach his highschool graduation and sitting above the 90th percentile of all students that had participated the higher education entrance exam.

Upon receiving invitations from one among the top universities in the world, the boy was intrigued. The victory meant a lot for the him, who received a tremendous confidence boost, and quickly accepted the offer and enrolled himself into the university. But then, he faced a big dilemma, that he in fact did not have any idea where he was supposed to go, what he was supposed to do. He was both naive and clueless about this world and himself. So he sought advice, he wanted an answer laid out for him.

"What about engineering? We could use that to better the chances of getting a permanent residency in this land for all of us since the government is hiring engineers! We've come this far, ain't going back now!" His mother spoke, across the telephone line, telling him what plans she had in store for him.

"You've always been a smart boy, there is no fault that we have given you one of the best brains in this world. You could do it!" The father let out an assuring laugh, across the telephone line.

The boy, convinced of his success and endorsed by his family members, ensured himself that going with their plan wouldn't be a bad solution, because underneath, he'd always wanted to be a hero and he secretly fantasises that being an engineer is the realistic way to achieve his goal. He thus took on the position, of being an electrical engineering student, and his university life started.

Electrical engineering, if the boy had expressed his opinion about that he felt about the course in general: It was hard, very demanding. The boy had to quickly familiar with complex mathematics, physics as well as electrical theories that could range all the way from computational logic to power theories, while the difficulty just kept scaling up after each semester as the courses were becoming specialised.

Unfortunately, the university is not the same as the highschool, if schools are microcosms of societies then the universities are the real deal. It was pretty much essential that the courses required some forms of teamwork in order to get through. And as fate would have it, history repeats again for the clueless boy. He had no luck in making friends, and he was even on one occasion distanced by a tutor. The boy could not comprehend why. Then ended the first semester of the university, where he already failed 2 subjects because he really had no idea what was going on. The second semester went by identically, so was the third. Before the boy had truly realised, he had already failed more than half of the subjects.

The boy had managed to make some friends during this time, some came to abandon him, some stayed around, much to the boy's joy, and some eventually moved on, much to the boy's dismay. It was also around this time the sense of being defeated had started to creep onto the boy's mind. The family had also started to run into some issues. Out of frustration, they also on occasion called the boy a failure and all sorts of nasty names. This damaged the boy greatly. He started running away, he started despising his parents and blaming them for putting him into the situation, he started abandoning himself. He frequently engaged in arguments with his families, he had said mean words to his parents who he knew had only suggested the position to him rather than forcing it onto him and it was also his own choice to stay around the subject, he had started distancing himself from everybody believing himself to be useless.

Fortunately, the boy was lucky to have a handful people that no matter what state he was in, would criticise, encourage and be there for him.

"For them, I will do my very best. I can't let them down." The boy thought to himself.

The flame rekindled, the boy caught up his previously failed courses in summer breaks, and managed to catch up with everybody's progress for the most part. The boy had once again found a purpose that would sustain himself through the hardships, through the engineering program, and everything seemed to be going just fine. Then the 3rd year came, where the boy failed all of his subjects in 1 go, despite his effort. His spirit was completely shattered.

He sought help among the lecturers and professors, most of which viewed him as a liability, and dismissed the boy. Only 1 person, sat down and talked to him, arranged various goals for him, and welcomed the boy whenever he needed it. The boy, from the bottom of his heart, was greatly moved. He pushed to his uttermost limit in the semester after, and had successfully passed all courses with above-average results. While it was by no means a great accomplishment, but it nonetheless provided great emotional relief for the boy, thinking that it didn't let the kindness to waste.

From the endless failing, the boy had learned, had sought help and received help. Each failing meant something needed to be adjusted. The boy began to learn his way around things, even if it was already too late, but at least he had made it, somewhat. He started to expand his circles, as well as maintaining them better. Learned to not only work hard, he also had to work smarter as well. His world-view had also widened, he strived to be empathetic and understanding, precisely because he knew how bad it must feel for being on the worse end of the stick.

And it was also for the first time, the boy started to deeply question his true motives. During his long history of failure during his study in the engineering field, the boy had begun to wonder: "Maybe it is just not something he should be doing? And if so, what is it then? I can't always be living for other's sake, what is mine?" The boy thought long and hard, and came up with a few points of interest: First, he really liked animation. Second, he really like the concept of traveling (he never got the chance to). Third, he really like the concept of creating and crafting things in some manner (home-cooking and the occasional homeware fixes are as far as he'd gone into it). Fourth, he also has profound interest for architecture designs. What could he do with combine all of them? The boy wondered. The boy hadn't settled, because a part of him still wanted to fulfill the family's desire at least in some form, but if entirely possible, for the time being he wanted to be an independent animator some time in the future. It was a personal goal he came up on his own.

The boy, now an young adult in his mid 20s, is still struggling to complete the final year of his original 4th year degree. He however does not regret walking on his current path, because all of the events that he has gone through makes the him now. He has learned and developed, and he no longer hates himself or his family as he used to.

"The skills will come in handy some time, knowing 1 more bit of knowledge is still 1 bit more than what I used to know" He has also decided to finish what he had started, to finish the university degree, before moving on. The young man now has a goal to work to, just that finishing the things currently on his hand would take priority for now.

He likes to think that he has come a long way, even to the eyes of many he has barely moved from his original position. But hey. Though a little part of him does like to wonder occasionally, what could he have become if he hadn't chose the path in the first place, would he have gone through less frustration and live a more fulfilling live right now?

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The story is really a mouthful, I kind of got carried away while typing it, but I did try answering the questions.

If you want a summary:

Don't to take steps lightly when you don't know what's waiting ahead of you, tread lightly and wisely, and ask yourself where is it that you really want to go. And even if the path turns out to be in the opposite direction of where you actually want to go, don't worry, there eventually will be a road that connects there, and for the meantime just enjoy the detour. And don't worry too much about failing because you have to fail to know where you're doing wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
@Blue Sphere It was worth starting this thread if just for your story alone — and I am so glad you got carried away! It was hard for me to read it, because... of some things, but I am happy I did, and I believe other INFPs would benefit if they took the time to reflect on what you contributed here, and I hope others will follow suit and share their experience. Thank you so much.
 

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Whatever you decide, stay away from Accounting. :laughing:
 

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Hahaha. True. The only subject in college i almost failed. XD
I actually went to college FOR an Accounting degree. I stopped after the first year because it was way too monotonous and way too boring and I would get so lost in all of the numbers.

The ONLY class I didn't make an A in was Financial Account II.

It still bugs me to this day. lol
 

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@mizz Pray say more about it! I would like to hear more, if you are willing to tell. And by the way, what are you studying now? Did you get back to another degree? Did you go independent?
 

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@mizz Pray say more about it! I would like to hear more, if you are willing to tell. And by the way, what are you studying now? Did you get back to another degree? Did you go independent?
No, unfortunately the community college I was attending stopped accepting student loans so I couldn't afford to keep going. I was a single mom at the time, so I had to suck it up and find a job.

I'm not currently studying anything and honestly, don't have a clue what I would like to study. I would do nursing but I can't handle needles (pass out).

I'm 36 years old and still unsure what I want to do with my life. I think I would much rather prefer just being a stay-at-home mom, but I have to find a man that agrees with that lifestyle. lol
 
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I actually went to college FOR an Accounting degree. I stopped after the first year because it was way too monotonous and way too boring and I would get so lost in all of the numbers.

The ONLY class I didn't make an A in was Financial Account II.

It still bugs me to this day. lol
I studied in accounting, yep. My accounting classes were miserable, but working in accounting is fun for me.

(wasn't always that way though, which a whole another story)

@Blue Sphere Wow your story made me cry a little in my heart. The feeling of disillusionment after failing, questioning life purpose, failing again, disappointing family, etc. Life is really full of ups, downs, discoveries, re-discoveries, and failing along the way. :sad: Electrical Engineering is very tough, so I commend you for sticking out on it!
 

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I aimed for engineering all my life. After wasting way too much time trying to deny that I have very little interest in designing systems that do things, I'm now in my first year of psychology. So far it's going great, and is extremely interesting.
 

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I started studying again for the first time in over a decade. I decided I wanted to acquire a skillset in computer programming to give myself some real opportunities in the workforce. In the short-term, I am hoping to get some freelance work from home once I get really well-versed in the subject matter. In the long-term, I am hoping to be able to get a job working for an actual company at some point in time. My options are really wide open, and i'm not sure which type of work i'd be better suited for.

What is it you're currently learning?

I'm studying the Python computer language right now. Once i've fully mastered it, I plan to learn another language from scratch. I've read that once you learn one language, learning another one is substantially easier than the first. So I guess this is the hardest part, but I do have to start somewhere. I'm roughly halfway through my textbook right now, and i'm actually understanding everything i'm reading, so that's a good sign. There are so many resources online to learn from that for every single question i've had, someone else out there has already answered it. I'm realizing that this subject matter is right up my alley, and that I was probably meant to be studying this all along.

How long have you been doing it?

I've been studying for 3-4 hours a day for a little under a month now. On some days, i'll study and read a bit more than usual. On other days, i'll dial it back a bit and just relax. I find it's important for me to take breaks once in a while just to let things sink in. If I get confused or overwhelmed with something, there's no sense in getting frustrated, so i'll just stop what i'm doing and relax for a while. I have all the time in the world to do this. I find that when I come back and try again, I often find it much easier with a clear and focused mind.

What is it all about? Other people may have the wrong impression of your discipline, so what is your learning experience really like?

Learning a computer language is nothing like I expected, really. Sure, there's the math and logic aspect to it, but it's much more creative than I ever imagined. There are usually multiple ways you can tackle a problem in order to get to the same solution. At least that's how it's seemed so far. There is a great deal of precision required in writing the code, though. If even one character is incorrect, the entire program won't work. Sometimes, it's incredibly frustrating when I can't get the code to do exactly what I want it to. Other times, it's incredibly satisfying to solve a problem on my own, without outside assitance or guidance. I'm finding i'm becoming much more comfortable with it in the last little while. Even though the things i'm learning about right now are technically more complicated, i'm finding it easier now than I did at the very beginning. Weird!

Are you enrolled in an institution or learning on your own?

Both. I'm enrolled in an online course on Coursera, but i'm also learning on my own. It's not an actual university I suppose, but it's the best I can do right now. I'm not sure I want to go back to school as a full-time student, so this is my alternative. I finished the first course I enrolled in last week, and I immediately enrolled in the follow-up class to continue. The second class is more complicated, but as I said earlier, i'm finding it easier in a weird way. I've been using all the resources I have at my disposal to learn as quickly and as efficiently as possible. There's so many websites online where you can practice writing code. I've also been reading tutorials, textbooks, and help websites. Every facet has helped me advance my knowledge in some way or another.

How do you feel about it? Is it fulfilling? Are you happy with it?

I'm really enjoying learning something useful again. It's very fulfilling to be able to actually apply knowledge to solve problems. I can write some pretty nifty basic programs now. While they don't have any practical applications to my life quite yet, they are getting more and more advanced as I proceed. I'm very happy with what i'm studying right now. It's just a shame that I didn't pursue this as I had originally planned when I was in my early 20s. This is what I wanted to study all along. I should've buckled down years and years ago, but I can't change the past, so I won't try.

What advice would you have to those wishing to follow on your footsteps?

Read, then read some more. Ask a lot of questions. Google is your friend. If you don't understand something, go and review older material until it really sinks in, then come back with a fresh perspective. Try to solve problems on your own, even if you don't think you know what you're doing. Oftentimes, i've found that I get 80% of the problem right on my first attempt. The other 20% is just fine-tuning and syntax mistakes. The logic of programming is a lot easier than the nitty-gritty details involved. As an INFP, I have trouble with the details sometimes! Maybe that's just me, though.

Yup, i'm well on my way now.
 

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Hey there,first off i would like to wish you all the best in anything that you choose to study.I can't say whether you should go to college or not since I'm not too familiar with the current situation of your country but if you can afford it,why not?You will meet all sorts of people while you pursue your studies and I'd advise that you make friends with as many as you can.
Now I'll attempt to answer your questions.

What is it you're currently learning?

I'm fascinated with anthropology and languages so that means my education never ends.Though I do have a law degree but I'm currently not practising as I feel it's probably not the time for me to do so.

How long have you been doing it?

I've been doing it since 2008 if I remember correctly and I'm pretty much an autodidact with regard to anthropology and languages.Though I did receive formal education in English and my native language but I've studied English way deeper than before.I'm also learning other European languages such as French,Spanish,Russian and German.

What is it all about? Other people may have the wrong impression of your discipline, so what is your learning experience really like?

As I've mentioned earlier,I'm fascinated with anthropology which means I'm interested in who,what,why,when and all that about humans.I read history,study the languages,read on why people think the way they do and so much more.People often say I read too much but my interests in people just makes me do that so I can't help it.It's exhausting at times but I feel it's all worth it in my quest for knowledge.

Are you enrolled in an institution or learning on your own?

I am pretty much learning on my own but I do want to join classes for the languages that I'm learning soon.

How do you feel about it? Is it fulfilling? Are you happy with it?

I am happy with my choice of interest and I think it is very fulfilling.I often know why people act or think the way they do and my knowledge of a lot of things in general makes me confident to speak to just about anyone in life.And what makes it better is I always have something to teach my friends.

What advice would you have to those wishing to follow on your footsteps?

I would advise that whoever wishes to do what I do must have the patience to keep entertaining your curiosities in whatever subject no matter how trivial.One example I can give is that once i was googling a movie called The Brothers Grimm (2005) and in that movie,the setting was French occupied Germany era.So I read on how the French invaded Germany and then I found out about the enmity between the French and the Germans and then I found out that they were ethnically different people.From there I learned about the different ethnicities in Europe and many more and it all started with me googling a movie.

So there you have it,that's basically what I'm currently doing.
I hope my experience could give you an insight to what you would like to pursue but don't be sad if you don't get to pursue it because the internet offers so much and you can learn by yourself anyway.
Before I stop,I'd like to share with you a quote which I live by:
“My heart is at ease knowing that what was meant for me will never miss me, and that what misses me was never meant for me.”
- Al-Shafi'i
 

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I actually went to college FOR an Accounting degree. I stopped after the first year because it was way too monotonous and way too boring and I would get so lost in all of the numbers.

The ONLY class I didn't make an A in was Financial Account II.

It still bugs me to this day. lol
Haha. Forget about it already haha.
 

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Personally, I thought this was a really great thread. I had ideas of something like this except more towards work experience and careers. Before I start, I want to note: College is an investment, you don't jump in not knowing what to do or where to go and hope for the best - same as any investment. You invest wisely in yourself. People who can't afford it, I recommend getting work experience; it's more than half the times what employers are looking for. Credentials like a degree are only required if the employer is asking for it, but they will always, always ask for work experience.

Coming out of high school, my grades were dismal because I was a punk and a truant; never applied myself. Going into college I had a lot of phases. I wanted to triple major. I currently hold two degrees and one is for a bachelors of science for psychology because I only had 2 classes at the time to do to get the degree. I studied most science, humanities, and misc fields so much so that I could easily get tons of bachelors from a few missing classes in say biology, cognitive sci, philosophy, sociology, comp sci, business, a few healthcare fields like dental, etc... The list goes on.

I had to buckle down though as my free ride was ending for tuition. I was disillusioned and I also fell in love with evolutionary science. I wanted to and was on my way to get my masters in bioinformatics and do DNA sequencing then coming out as a geneticist. However, I realized at the time, I didn't want to go to graduate or post grad. It wasn't for me at the time and I was burnt out on schooling (my grades are very high in college, like chancellor's list high).

Currently, I work in finance and am still studying hobbies like MMA, but nothing truly academic. I make enough that buying $500 suits are not a big deal and I get a lot of freedom. Lately, the company has been changing a lot with the economy. Not to my liking. I've been thinking more and more about coming back to school as a back-up in case I don't feel like seeking out other jobs in the finance sector (I do like my current job). I just don't know. I had dreams of being in architecture, genetics, or therapy. I do really love health science. I like working to cure people but it involves so much risk. My true love is philosophy and if I went in there, I'd pick coming out working in foreign policies/relations, maybe law, or advocacy policies. They would normally want a masters or sometimes supplementary experience/study though...

You're welcome to ask me anything on the fields I've taken. There's just too much to expand on in one post.
 

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But please try to answer the following questions:
What is it you're currently learning?
I'm studying history and politics for a BA at university.

How long have you been doing it?
I've ended my 2nd year this year.

What is it all about? Other people may have the wrong impression of your discipline, so what is your learning experience really like?
What I think people's impressions of these subjects are that it's mainly just endless essays which is pretty much correct. I think politics and history while not being a "firm career" job are viewed as a bit more of "serious professions/studies" than English or arts subjects. So it's kind of in the middle which is ok I guess to me.


Are you enrolled in an institution or learning on your own?
University

How do you feel about it? Is it fulfilling? Are you happy with it?
I'm quite happy. My grades aren't perfect but they're getting better and better with time as I learn gradually the ins and outs of essay and assignment work. I think I may be able to get one or more high distinctions next year though I haven't quite reached that level yet. It's fulfilling because I love history and I'm interested in politics. Even though the courses aren't always structured in the way I would prefer them to be it's engaging with my interests and that's enough for me.

What advice would you have to those wishing to follow on your footsteps?
Practice makes perfect, idk about career choices as that remains to be seen but the schoolwork itself is quite fun. Learn as much as you can yourself by your own research and your understanding will improve, as well as your interest, a million times more than if you just listen to what's in the course itself. Most importantly don't take it too seriously, at the end of the day it's about learning not about grades, and if you get a bad grade but improved your understanding in the process then in the end you won. Understanding will stick with your mind and help you. A grade is just a number on a sheet of paper.
 

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@mizz Well, then I hope you will find some good ideas here for what to study. I plan on studying some accounting, most probably independently, so as to take better care of my finances. By the way, you can be a stay-at-home-mom and have a thrilling intellectual life — we can learn anywhere, after all. If I can get my way, God willing, I will stay at home and work from there myself.

@TheJ Can you please write more about it? I am really interested.

@Artemicion I am also interested in computer programming, and though it started as a hobby, it is something I plan to escalate in the future, mix with some other interests, and perhaps start creating some useful things. I have even dabbled on Python for a while, before getting into Scheme — which is an amazing language to learn, and there is a lot of good content; I mean, The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs uses it, and just have a look at the cover of The Little Schemer and see if you can skip it! Like you, I have discovered (and enjoyed) the creative aspect of writing code. I am so happy for your post, thank you so much!

@Rezza My, I rarely encounter people quoting al-Shāfi'ī outside of Islamic circles. I also appreciate your autodidact approach — a trying one: coordinating the learning process, seeking out the best methods, managing the time we have... all that can be demanding. I have never studied anthropology, so I cannot speak about that, but we share enthusiasm on languages — my English is self-taught. Thank you for your contribution, and I also wish you the best in your studies.

@coma I did create a similar thread dedicated to work experience and careers (personalitycafe.com/infp-forum-idealists/964586-infp-careers-professions-thread.html) — I hope it will eventually start growing like this one. Both the themes are very important, for the mistakes we make in both areas tend to be costly, monetarily and chronologically. Better to find out what it means to commit before we do. This is actually amazing, how I find correlations between my own background and those of everyone who contributed he — in our case, I can speak of having been "a punk and a truant" when I finished high school, also about my many interests. It is astonishing all the disciplines you have tackled, by the way, and hope you can delve deeper into some of them when you have time.

@Adonnus Two interesting fields! Do you have some favorite books you can recommend?
 

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Two interesting fields! Do you have some favorite books you can recommend?
Guns Germs and Steel, all Antony Beevor books and something called Russia: the 1000 Year Chronicle of the Wild East will probably double your historical understanding just from them and they're very well written and interesting as well
 

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I aimed for engineering all my life. After wasting way too much time trying to deny that I have very little interest in designing systems that do things, I'm now in my first year of psychology. So far it's going great, and is extremely interesting.
@TheJ Can you please write more about it? I am really interested.

@coma I did create a similar thread dedicated to work experience and careers (personalitycafe.com/infp-forum-idealists/964586-infp-careers-professions-thread.html) — I hope it will eventually start growing like this one. Both the themes are very important, for the mistakes we make in both areas tend to be costly, monetarily and chronologically. Better to find out what it means to commit before we do. This is actually amazing, how I find correlations between my own background and those of everyone who contributed he — in our case, I can speak of having been "a punk and a truant" when I finished high school, also about my many interests. It is astonishing all the disciplines you have tackled, by the way, and hope you can delve deeper into some of them when you have time.
I can give you some of my perspective of when I was in psych since one of my degrees is in it.

How long have you been doing it?

I held a BS, which requires you to take more classes usually, and in the science fields like chem and bio. BS's are generally more wanted from my impression for when you interview for graduates. BS's are more on the "experimental" and research side of things which is what you'll always be doing for your grad and post-grad, so prep yourself already.

What is it all about? Other people may have the wrong impression of your discipline, so what is your learning experience really like?

Pro-tip, when you're in psych undergrad, you NEED to do more. Take those honors, help publish a paper, be on a review board or psych committee at your college, get whatever experience, work or research, as much as you can. Volunteer in the school's counselor's office. Bachelors psych is elementary, that's why you NEED to go to grad and post grad for well paying jobs. People go into college thinking if they just get the degree they'll be set. WRONG. You have to put in that effort to show that you stand above the rest and that you have notable things on your resume or CV when you apply for a job or for graduates/post grad. It's just like job interview except more geared towards your academic achievements, and not just grades, because you think you're the only one making high marks?? That'd be naive. You need to have more.

Psych as a discipline, it was fun. I loved it, loved the concepts, possibilities, etc... It gets boring every once in a while, but I learned a lot. I absolutely loved my class seminars in evolutionary psychology and personality psychology. Cognitive psychology was one of the most useful for me. But you need to keep in mind, you need classes that will fit your end goal of what field and work you're going into. In retrospect, I should've taken I/O psych.

Are you enrolled in an institution or learning on your own?

Institute

What advice would you have to those wishing to follow on your footsteps?

This is the most section.

Personally, I didn't go into psychology because I couldn't decide when I was younger, eg. cog psych? I/O psych? health psych? clinical psych? counseling psych? I didn't have that experience or work experience so I had nothing to base it off of. I also had a lot of problems conforming to the "red tape" for psychology. You can only operate within certain boundaries and your department can dictate that a lot of times too. I didn't like how my department was ran.

You need to go to grad and post grad, so it's a one way shot if you decide to go into psych and want to work in psych. I'm being as real as I can be about this right now. If you're in America, you'll report to the APA, American Psychology Association. It'll kind of be like for licensing too when you have to get your license or it renewed depending on what you do in psych. I recommend also attending any psych seminars, join any psych groups and clubs and associations, and know your department chairs and staff! You have to have connections, you need that foot in the door and recommendation letters.

It all does vary, but yes, INFPs are good with psych and can have careers in it. Will you be the right INFP that will stick with it? I don't know. I do know you have to definitely put the effort in and stay on top of it. Psych is a baby field, it's still new and not organized and the amount of possibilities in it is ridiculous.
 
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