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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The INFPs who are often labelled as HSP (Highly Sensitive Person) bear the harsh burden of having their heart being heavily influenced by the feelings of their emotions, where the certain emotion is amplified to a extremely sensitive state which affects the mental health drastically, perhaps more often than other MBTI type.

Thus i have come to the hypothetical theory that that Fi dominant trait of INFPs can be dangerous to the mental health of the heart, hence how the majority of the INFPs are more vulnerable to depression, or how the absolute happiness that is very rarely achieved overtires the heart to the point of being halted due to failure to keep up.

The human heart is truly a unique organ that determines your outlook on life, based on how stimulated it is. Poor stimulation of heart which includes irregular or slow beating hinder your ability to enjoy the basic pleasures of life to a satisfying level, which can be very depressing for the individual. On the other end, it can be painfully unrealistic, since the mental intelligence of the INFP's brain is overpowered from disbelieving in fairy happy endings, unless this is processed in the long-term scenario, such as very compatible love match combined with long years of friendship.

The reason why i claim that the Fi trait which i possess is dangerous is for the heart, is because that i hate being overly sensitive to my feelings that are introverted into my heart, unintentionally damaging the mentality of my heart and making it too weak for me to become happy normally. Instead, I require the special method of becoming happy which is very difficult to find it myself or for others to find it, in order to fulfill the very large void in my heart, as small feelings are not enough to satisfy my heart. Being stuck with this problem makes me more vulnerable to depression, and very hateful days. The Fi's influences on the heart has transformed it into a new identity which response to emotions more strongly than i'm capable of controlling, thus producing unnecessarily feelings i'm forced to deal with on a daily basis on my own terms.

I'm remember there was a thread that said the hardest type is to be is INFP, as right of now, i couldn't agree more with it, especially as a male as imposed to female being far more suited to this personality type.

So guys, what's your opinion on my theory? or how can i control what my heart feels ?
 

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dangerous to the mental health of the heart
This statement is funny :p

I think I know what you are trying to get at. It is true that poor mental function can have adverse physiological effects, since the brain controls the rest of the body.

Fi is about strong ideals. Humans experience great disutility when they have a strong expectation which is not met (in a negative direction). Presumably, those dominant in Fi weight these ideals more strongly than others, so it makes sense that they would suffer the most disutility from unmet expectations.

So guys, what's your opinion on my theory? or how can i control what my heart feels ?
You can't control what you feel completely, but perhaps there is a way of broadening your set of expected outcomes to be more realistic, in order to avoid disappointment from expecting nothing less than one particular standard or outcome.
 

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Being an HSP has its good sides too. It makes you quite thoughtful and enables you to enjoy sceneries in a different way.
 

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You make a very interesting point. Would this be the same with ISFP's, since their dominant function is Fi as well. And ENFP's, and any Fi out there. But remember, don't let your emotions bubble up inside, don't be afraid to talk to others. :happy:

notsocold95, a little off topic, but I love your avatar. my sister--an ENFP--and I used to joke about how the Hulk would say, "HULK GREEN WITH ENVY! HULK SAD NOW, HULK TURN BLUE." Good times.
 

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Every function is dangerous in one way or another, so why not look at the bright side?

Sure, a strong sense of Fi might accentuate the negative and make you feel more down in the dumps than you would otherwise, but even those who are depressed don't experience negative emotions all the time. Fi is the architect of a rich inner world devoid of the superficiality that permeates the outside, and the amplifier of positive emotions to outweigh the negative - I wouldn't pick any other function to be my main one.
 

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Well, every single day of my life I am feeling some kind of a chest pain in the area of my heart and its intensity is somehow linked to my feelings, which are linked to my emotions, so its intensity can change uncontrollably.

However, if I just let [emotions -> feelings -> chest pain] do their own business, or simply said: "let them be", it doesn't affect my already hard normal functioning and chest pain is not a problem anymore.

P.S.: Difference between emotions and feelings.
 

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How old are you? I remember having a tough time as a teenager; hormones and mental illness and being HSP were a killer combination.

Things tend to die down a bit in adulthood though, and not only from the teenager craziness subsiding. A more developed Ne gives you a broader perspective; you're no longer a slave to your Fi screaming, "but why would they do that?! I would never do that!!" Sure you're still got the sensitivity and the idealistic streak, but you've also got a better understanding of how the world works, and some ideas on how to cope with it, and (hopefully) slightly better self-esteem.

I'm frequently disillusioned by other people and the horrors they create. But the people closest to me appreciate my sensitive, artistic nature and my integrity. It's rare, and we need more of it. I wouldn't change it for the world.
 

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I realized a few years ago that I was feeling so consistently stressed that I was starting to feel chest pain a lot. My instinct were telling me I couldn't live a very long life if it was going to be this way.

So I made changes. I deliberately chose to stop caring about other people's opinions so much. I visualized myself gathering them like cobwebs around my head and pulling them off, until it became automatic to not let them collect in the first place.

I accepted the fact that I function better when I have more down time than a 40-hour work week (combined with parenthood especially) will allow. I haven't had a conventional full-time job in years. Right now I have the tremendous blessing of a job that gives full-time benefits for five hours of work a day, split into two shifts. I spend the four hours in between online, watching TV. Listening to music I love, playing games, pursuing projects no one else will ever care about, thinking my thoughts... And occasionally I run an errand or do a house chore. I.e., during those hours alone I DO EXACTLY WHAT I WANT TO AT ANY GIVEN TIME.

So "selfish." And yet it's like I'm a new person. Happy, optimistic, able to be present for people who need me, and most importantly I no longer have that pain in my chest that makes me feel like I can never breathe in deep.

We need time to follow our Fi-Ne down the rabbit trails and into the Good. If not every day, then most days.

Take it.
 

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How old are you? I remember having a tough time as a teenager; hormones and mental illness and being HSP were a killer combination.

Things tend to die down a bit in adulthood though, and not only from the teenager craziness subsiding. A more developed Ne gives you a broader perspective; you're no longer a slave to your Fi screaming, "but why would they do that?! I would never do that!!" Sure you're still got the sensitivity and the idealistic streak, but you've also got a better understanding of how the world works, and some ideas on how to cope with it, and (hopefully) slightly better self-esteem.

I'm frequently disillusioned by other people and the horrors they create. But the people closest to me appreciate my sensitive, artistic nature and my integrity. It's rare, and we need more of it. I wouldn't change it for the world.
This!

Age and experience brings perspective. Perspective puts things in context. Context allows you to understand (not agree with, but understand) a lot of what horrifies you. Understanding brings you a level of peace. I think adolescence and even most of your 20s is rough for INFPs. Fi that isn't augmented by your other functions yet can give you an unhealthy view of the world around you. But with age and experience your other functions strengthen and give you the tools to not only cope, but to take action on those ideals. You may hate your Fi now, but the sooner you accept it and recognize its real utility, the quicker peace will come.

I went through quite a few bouts of severe depression in my late teens and early 20s. In the middle of one episode I read an article that talked about outlook, and how happiness is by and large dependent on your outlook of life. In many ways I see this as a little too simplistic, but it made me become aware of how much of my Fi was focused on the negative things in life. I was upset with how much bad I saw in the world, in others, in myself. I made a conscience effort to identify the good in the world, the good in others, and the good in myself. There is good occurring all around you. Recognize it and acknowledge its existence. Fi, when focused on virtuous and moral ideas, is the most powerful force in the world.
 
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I realized a few years ago that I was feeling so consistently stressed that I was starting to feel chest pain a lot. My instinct were telling me I couldn't live a very long life if it was going to be this way.

So I made changes. I deliberately chose to stop caring about other people's opinions so much. I visualized myself gathering them like cobwebs around my head and pulling them off, until it became automatic to not let them collect in the first place.

I accepted the fact that I function better when I have more down time than a 40-hour work week (combined with parenthood especially) will allow. I haven't had a conventional full-time job in years. Right now I have the tremendous blessing of a job that gives full-time benefits for five hours of work a day, split into two shifts. I spend the four hours in between online, watching TV. Listening to music I love, playing games, pursuing projects no one else will ever care about, thinking my thoughts... And occasionally I run an errand or do a house chore. I.e., during those hours alone I DO EXACTLY WHAT I WANT TO AT ANY GIVEN TIME.

So "selfish." And yet it's like I'm a new person. Happy, optimistic, able to be present for people who need me, and most importantly I no longer have that pain in my chest that makes me feel like I can never breathe in deep.
Yeah, 40 hour week is a poison to me too.

Too bad there are no half-time jobs.
 

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While this is true, i also think INFPs can be the happiest MBTI type. It just boils down to how much attention we give our thoughts. Our playful minds produce a lot of background noise, we can not help listening but take it with a grain of salt. The moment we accept thoughts seriously they become heavy and blow out of proportion. Reserve this for the positive thoughts! ;)
 

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While this is true, i also think INFPs can be the happiest MBTI type. It just boils down to how much attention we give our thoughts. Our playful minds produce a lot of background noise, we can not help listening but take it with a grain of salt. The moment we accept thoughts seriously they become heavy and blow out of proportion. Reserve this for the positive thoughts! ;)
That is good, but then you still have to maintain where your attention goes and that requires energy.

Well, if you truly want to be happy, all you need to do is to entirely embrace entity you call "I" and you will feel like this.

In addition to previous sentence, every fantasy has its equivalent in reality, you just have to find it.
 

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That is good, but then you still have to maintain where your attention goes and that requires energy.
The act of maintaining your attention is more costly to your energy than just letting it go free, but what is key is that you are the observer of this letting go. By doing this you distinguish between you and your thoughts. This is what it means to be mindful.

Well, if you truly want to be happy, all you need to do is to entirely embrace entity you call "I" and you will feel like this.
I can see why you would say this but by doing this you will only indulge in a false happiness. "I" never stops wanting, and so you will keep chasing things to fill the hole. Like numbers your want will have no end.

In addition to previous sentence, every fantasy has its equivalent in reality, you just have to find it.
Nicely said, i agree :tongue:.
 

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The act of maintaining your attention is more costly to your energy than just letting it go free, but what is key is that you are the observer of this letting go. By doing this you distinguish between you and your thoughts. This is what it means to be mindful.

I can see why you would say this but by doing this you will only indulge in a false happiness. "I" never stops wanting, and so you will keep chasing things to fill the hole. Like numbers your want will have no end.
I haven't realized you were talking about mindfullnees. Also, you have just helped me realize something.

Although I thought that I have replaced [mindfullness] with [embracing yourself] in my life, I actually still heavily rely on mindfullness, but through my system for life; more precisly: through "becoming aware of entity X" part of it.
 
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Have you looked into job-sharing? Some employers will allow two workers to split the hours for the same position. You never know until you ask :)
No, I can't get any job anyway.
 

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I agree with what you are saying. My feelings have led me down wrong paths when it comes to relationships even when the rational part of my mind was screaming that it was a mistake I didn't' not listen. Even when choosing a career i followed my feelings and well I spent ten years chasing a dream that was never going to happen. But you do have to follow your heart sometimes.
 

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Man I feel this too. Though lately i've been able to separate my feelings as if they were another person inside of me. Don't think me crazy but its a little bit like Yugioh where yugi has the pharaoh spirit inside of him. I've hit my midlife and after doing a lot of research on midlife and Carl Jung with the anima projections and all it says that in midlife a person needs to develop their inferior function and that's been coming out a lot more lately. My extraverted thinking has been yelling at my introverted feeling to stop lying to me about stuff because my feeling only want to live in a fairy tale. I actually told my boss that I would work for free. Not very realistic but I do love my job so much that I idealize it and I lose sight of the fact that in reality there are bills to pay and food to buy and all that real life stuff.
 
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