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One thing I really love about being ISTP is that I'm always the last to panic in any crisis (except in the case where there is another ISTP around, then we'll go for a hot cuppa and forget about the whole crisis altogether). For me, there's no problem so big it can't be solved. And if there is, then what's the point of panicking anyway? I've never felt the inclination to 'be prepared' for anything in life. Come what may, ISTPs will 'wing it' when it happens.

I suspect big names like Nike and Adidas are really trying to appeal and sell to ISTPs with their 'Just Do It' and 'Impossible is Nothing' slogans! LOL

Do other ISTPs agree on this one?
 

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Not sure about Nike and Adidas and their marketing campaign / target market, but:

I can definitely identify with the lack of panic button thing. Dumb example from yesterday: took my kid to this play facility with those inflatable jump/slide things - it's a huge warehouse with compressors and screaming kids and big plastic slides and crap - miserable Lord of the Flies training facility. Anyway, I'm sitting near one of the bouncey houses, and the thing starts to collapse with all these kids in it.

Now. It's an inflatable bouncey house. Other than the kids falling on each other, no one's gonna get hurt.

Every parent around me screams - and I mean every last one. I might have lifted an eyebrow, but the rest of the moms were in a chicken-head-cut-off state, all hysterics. For a second I wondered, "is there something wrong with me, that I didn't freak out when kids were possibly in danger?" To which I immediately answered, "no one was in fucking danger, and even if they were, screaming and being an asshole about it wouldn't do shit."

Sometimes things startle me, like a nearby car accident or whatever. I still don't panic; the reality of the event goes through my head in some logical fashion, and I determine what my next move should be. Often, my next move is to raise an eyebrow and observe, or just walk away. I've never been one to push my way to the front of the crowd to watch a street fight, or stand in the middle of the road screaming because someone got their purse snatched.

Don't know if that's inherently ISTP (I'm not sure of my type), but I do identify with the calmness in the middle of irrational panic. Or, really, any big display of emotion - I'm pretty neutral most of the time. If most humans react to situations on a scale of -100 to +100, I react somewhere around -10 to +20, I'd say.
 

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I understand.

But I also find that something switches on in my mind when a dangerous/panic causing situation arises. My mind quickly recognises that everyone else is 'doing their nut in' and probably unable to sort out the problem. So I usually step up and take the necessary practical steps to sort it out.

For example: I was in a recent taxi accident here in China. Our taxi driver crashed into the back of another car, and he got out of his vehichle to argue with the other driver who he'd hit. A friend sitting next to me said 'i'm afraid' and was feeling trapped, very much looking like he wanted to get out of the taxi in the middle of a number of other busy lanes with traffic running past either side of the vehicle very quickly. I told him to calm down, and wait 2 or 3 minutes next to me as it seemed logical that the driver would soon return and move on. My friend waited, the driver soon returned, and the crisis passed. :)

...however, he did then race after the other driver yelling something in Chinese that I couldn't decipher! Fun times.
 

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Aha, another one without the button here. :D Here, if anyone wants it:

Anyway, already very young I was influenced by two things: Napoleon's (I think) motto that you should in tense situations always count to ten and then react. And that (I'm not sure if this saying is in every language) "morning is smarter than the evening"; meaning - let it rest for a while. Both made me reeeeeaaaally phlegmatic, because every time something out-of-plan happens, all the others start running around in panic and hysteria, what to do, what now ... and I just halfly-asleep growl at them to shut up because everything will solve itself. And it always does, it actually still surprises me. This happened a lot during my summer in Asia (Asia is a pretty big challenge for people with huge panic buttons I see :D) - we missed a bus, we lost plane tickets, we stayed without money, my mates were about to leave every second day but before the next day everything was fine again. Until now, it never failed so I have no intentions of getting a button for myself.
 

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Hmmm...I think I have a so-called panic button, but it operates a little differently than for most people. Instead of becoming hysterical and irrational, when the button is pushed I become more locked-in and focused on what really matters. When confronted by others, I often express to them that I "feel panicked" as to allow them to recognize that I am in a different mode of thinking even though it may not be expressed with my body language.
 

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Hmmmmm... well... i dont know.
I think i might have panicked when i flunked out of college the first time. During the Electomagnetism class i got a flashback of my ex and started failing miserably (her last name was Volt) in every subject. From A/B-s to F-s and E-s in one semester. The only thing i could attribute it was "panic attack" that paralyzed my will to study completely, coupled with some other other traumatic events earlier made short work of my first attempt in college.

However... when i was messing about with some pipebombs, i had accidentally made the fuse too fast so it was going at a way faster rate than it should and wouldnt have cleared us before it blew up. The mates i was with just simply froze and didnt do anything while i just pulled out the fuse. Was it just luck? I dont know.
 

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Not sure about Nike and Adidas and their marketing campaign / target market, but:

I can definitely identify with the lack of panic button thing. Dumb example from yesterday: took my kid to this play facility with those inflatable jump/slide things - it's a huge warehouse with compressors and screaming kids and big plastic slides and crap - miserable Lord of the Flies training facility. Anyway, I'm sitting near one of the bouncey houses, and the thing starts to collapse with all these kids in it.

Now. It's an inflatable bouncey house. Other than the kids falling on each other, no one's gonna get hurt.

Every parent around me screams - and I mean every last one. I might have lifted an eyebrow, but the rest of the moms were in a chicken-head-cut-off state, all hysterics. For a second I wondered, "is there something wrong with me, that I didn't freak out when kids were possibly in danger?" To which I immediately answered, "no one was in fucking danger, and even if they were, screaming and being an asshole about it wouldn't do shit."

Sometimes things startle me, like a nearby car accident or whatever. I still don't panic; the reality of the event goes through my head in some logical fashion, and I determine what my next move should be. Often, my next move is to raise an eyebrow and observe, or just walk away. I've never been one to push my way to the front of the crowd to watch a street fight, or stand in the middle of the road screaming because someone got their purse snatched.

Don't know if that's inherently ISTP (I'm not sure of my type), but I do identify with the calmness in the middle of irrational panic. Or, really, any big display of emotion - I'm pretty neutral most of the time. If most humans react to situations on a scale of -100 to +100, I react somewhere around -10 to +20, I'd say.
LOL

If I were there I would have started screaming with all the women
 

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when i was messing about with some pipebombs
I wouldn't go around telling people something like that, especially on a public forum. You never know you might end up with someone from the FBI or Homeland Security knocking at your door.
 

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Hmmm...becoming hysterical and irrational
It is a minor point, but technically only women can get hysterical.

Word Origin & History
hysterical
1610s, from L. hystericus "of the womb," from Gk. hysterikos "of the womb, suffering in the womb," from hystera "womb" (see uterus). Originally defined as a neurotic condition peculiar to women and thought to be caused by a dysfunction of the uterus. Meaning "very funny" (by 1939) is from the notion of uncontrollable fits of laughter.
 

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One thing I really love about being ISTP is that I'm always the last to panic in any crisis (except in the case where there is another ISTP around, then we'll go for a hot cuppa and forget about the whole crisis altogether). For me, there's no problem so big it can't be solved. And if there is, then what's the point of panicking anyway? I've never felt the inclination to 'be prepared' for anything in life. Come what may, ISTPs will 'wing it' when it happens.

I suspect big names like Nike and Adidas are really trying to appeal and sell to ISTPs with their 'Just Do It' and 'Impossible is Nothing' slogans! LOL

Do other ISTPs agree on this one?
Nothing wrong with being prepared. That is where discipline takes charge.
 

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:crazy: I actually clicked on that. I just had to.

I've travelled all over, to countries where buses come "whenever", to places where people are trying to swindle you at every corner, I've been bombarded by child begging gangs before (which is a distraction trick so that someone else can pickpocket you while you're being mobbed). I've worked at Barnes & Noble during Christmas season when I was the only one at the cash register with irate customers in front of a line wrapping around the other end of the store. At 16, I've had to google and perform CPR on the spot for my choking dog whilst on the phone with an emergency vet at the same time. (My ESFJ mother was no help, she was standing there gasping and crying about "her baby dying") etc etc, on and on.

I don't know why people panic. It's a waste of valuable energy and time. My heart skips a beat, but I never scream cry or pull out my hair.

Though if everyone else is, I feel compelled to do the same. Like I SHOULD be freaking out (instead of taking practical action) and there's something wrong with me. Does anyone else get this weird instinct to just do what everyone else is doing?
 

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I gotta say that I'm very surprised about the way ISTPs react to things. It really appears the panic buttom doesn't exist whithin them.
Actually, it seems they do not react very much in any way to anything. haha

So different from me. I'm used to reacting extremely and dramatically. It's not that I panic and lose control of myself, but I feel things in a really intense way.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Nothing wrong with being prepared. That is where discipline takes charge.
Nope. Nothing wrong at all. But I've always been totally ill-disciplined with things that are not important to me. On the other hand, when something matters to me, nothing will shift my focus. I used to be a long-distance runner and training was my life. Whenever there was a race coming, I'd prepare way in advance, just thinking about what I need to take with me on race day. And I would not miss a single morning of training with or without the coach. In winter, I'd still wake up at 4.20 am to make it for training even when all I wanted to do was hide under the warm covers. But apart from that, there is no discipline in any other areas of my life LOL....
 

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Hmmm...I think I have a so-called panic button, but it operates a little differently than for most people. Instead of becoming hysterical and irrational, when the button is pushed I become more locked-in and focused on what really matters. When confronted by others, I often express to them that I "feel panicked" as to allow them to recognize that I am in a different mode of thinking even though it may not be expressed with my body language.
Hey! I can identify with this. It's an awesome sort of feeling.
 

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I totally have a panic button, but i doesn't get pressed in situations that other people call emergencies, because to me they are not - just cause for clear thinking and action. When I am backed into a corner, in a job I hate, paying a mortgage on a house I don't want, to maintain a relationship that I couldn't care for... then you'll see me PAAANNNNNNIIIIIICCCC.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
When I am backed into a corner, in a job I hate, paying a mortgage on a house I don't want, to maintain a relationship that I couldn't care for... then you'll see me PAAANNNNNNIIIIIICCCC.
Geez - I think I just found my panic button from reading that!!! LOL
 

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I have panic disorder. My panic button is, um... defective. I don't panic about things people usually panic about though. My whole family is unemployed, we may lose our house soon, but that doesn't put me on edge at all. Touch me though, or ask me to fill out some paperwork/make a phone call, and my ability to function like a normal person dies... though I suppose if I can't be touched/fill out paperwork/make phone calls I'm not functioning like a normal person to begin with. :mellow:
 

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Instead of becoming hysterical and irrational, when the button is pushed I become more locked-in and focused on what really matters.
Yes.

I remember I was in the ocean with my friend. We were about 15. We both got caught in a strong undertow and it pulled us very far out while waves crashed over our heads pushing us under and back out every time we gained.

Anyway. I felt no fear and swam parallel to shore. I kept telling my friend not too quit and that we'd make it. We swan hard in the same spot for 30 minutes battling those waves. My friend said she couldn't move anymore and she stopped swimming. I told her to keep moving. She stopped and drifted out further. I realized that I could go to her which wasn't an option because she would hold onto me and pull me under or I could kick into another gear and get to shore to get help to save her. I don't know how I made it to shore but I did, told an adult that my friend was still out there. The lifeguards - I found out later they thought we were "kidding" - fucking idiots. They found my friend and carried her out. She was going to be okay.

I was exhilarated and wanted to go back in the water. I never felt more alive. That's the difference. ISTP's initial decision making processes are pretty right on and emergency situations allow that to free flow into existence without hesitation and when things work out to our advantage....it's a high.

It can also get us into some risky situations because we don't have that fear that a lot of other people have. For instance, I was involved in a hit and run accident. I chased the truck down and on a one way street pulled in front of them blocked 3/4ths of the roadway. I exited my vehicle and stood in the other 1/4 th of the road. (The reason I didn't want to block them totally was because I thought the truck would broadside my car to get out of the street and I could move much faster than my car. Hey. I like my car!). The truck tried to run me over and I had to jump out of the way but I was pissed so I grabbed onto their passenger side door (window was rolled all the way down). I cursed at the driver, got dragged about 20 feet and when I let go I landed on my chin and got some road rash. So...not so smart but it was instinctual. If I was scared I wouldn't have done any of that in the first place. Sometimes that lack of fear can be a detriment but hey it helps me out more than hurts me.
When confronted by others, I often express to them that I "feel panicked" as to allow them to recognize that I am in a different mode of thinking even though it may not be expressed with my body language.

I always say "I'm a little overwhelmed". lol.
 
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