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According to psychology researches, variety of choices and freedom actually make us more miserable.

Link: Barry Schwartz on the paradox of choice | Video on TED.com

I totally agree :D I think this relate back to synthesized happiness being the psychological immunity. When we are stuck in a situation, we learn to accept and adapt to it. When we are stuck with one choice C: we are spared the disappointments. Ahhh, one piece to the missing key of happiness. :D

What do you think?
 

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According to psychology researches, variety of choices and freedom actually make us more miserable.

Link: Barry Schwartz on the paradox of choice | Video on TED.com

I totally agree :D I think this relate back to synthesized happiness being the psychological immunity. When we are stuck in a situation, we learn to accept and adapt to it. When we are stuck with one choice C: we are spared the disappointments. Ahhh, one piece to the missing key of happiness. :D

What do you think?
Much of his speech is him deliberating on opportunity costs (which he just mentioned, I'm typing as I'm listening). I don't believe freedom of choice is limiting. In the market, simply, consumers will choose what they want and unwanted things will die off.

There are few cassette tapes, VHS, 8-tracks, and other competing items in existance because consumers preferred newer technology in most cases. Niche markets and throwback items do exist, there's been a recent resurgence in vinyl albums, but so far they don't threaten the dominant consumer product.

I don't believe depression has increased because there are more consumer options but because people cannot achieve REAL happiness through the pursuit of material goods. Materialism or consumerism is a dead end road to finding self-fulfillment, self-realization, or meaning. Buy an item, then item w/ spork comes out, buy that and then item w/ spork w/ camera comes out. Chasing that carrot will leave you wanting a different carrot, ad infinitum.

People need to break the shackles of consumerism, be happy with what they've got, and make RATIONAL decisions instead of EMOTIONAL decisions in purchasing material goods.

Which reminds me of this (although I don't agree with the all-singing, all-dancing part):

 

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Sounds interesting so far...

...hmmm embedded in the water...

...so then, because there's so many apparent opportunities the chance of actually finding one that is worthwhile is less likely?...

...what's so funny about the cell phones?...

...then the doc says, "Go fuck yourself." Hah hah!...

...Hah hah! Do it yourself commandments. I like it...

...Making sense, but what does simplifying things to get more people to play along have to do with the idea of more choices equals less happiness. To me it just means people aren't that interested...

...Oh wait, this about paralysis, but then he's just stating the obvious now...

...Nevermind I guess it is about happiness...

...Hah hah! That example of the guy looping from computers, to golf, to sex is hilarious...

...Hah hah! I wrote a whole book to try to explain this to myself...

...So the secret is low expectations. If this is true than I'm fucked...

...That fishbowl example was pretty good, kinda connects with his opening statement too. I think I'm going to try this. Thank you for posting this.

So yes, I agree. After changing my life for the better, I feel I've expanded my options so wide that nothing seems to satisfy me anymore. I'm constantly disappointed.
 

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absolutely, this goes with my whole why do people follow idea. People don't want to have make choices, I think the biggest thing is fear of making the wrong one. It's so much easier to know there is nothing else we can do because then there is no doubt or questions to be asked
 

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On the other hand, we have (I believe it was) Sartre (in his Myth of Sysiphus?) that said complete slavery was bliss, because every decision you had to make was made for you by your master. Having been in the service, I can testify to this. Knowing days in advance when you will eat, when you will sleep, when you will work, what you will wear and what you will do is actually quite soothing. Would anyone be truly happy with slavery though? It seems that on some fundamental level, we would reject this. I'm thinking of Agent Smith's discussion with Morpheus in the Matrix when he talked about alternative Utopian worlds that humanity rejected. I wonder if a world of slavery is one of them?


Edit: That's Camus, not Sartre.
 

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On the other hand, we have (I believe it was) Sartre (in his Myth of Sysiphus?) that said complete slavery was bliss, because every decision you had to make was made for you by your master. Having been in the service, I can testify to this. Knowing days in advance when you will eat, when you will sleep, when you will work, what you will wear and what you will do is actually quite soothing. Would anyone be truly happy with slavery though? It seems that on some fundamental level, we would reject this. I'm thinking of Agent Smith's discussion with Morpheus in the Matrix when he talked about alternative Utopian worlds that humanity rejected. I wonder if a world of slavery is one of them?
I believe if you were in such a position you would repress all desires because you know you could not obtain them. Basically, you'd rationalize what you have as being what you want. I'm sure there is some happiness but I believe it to simply be a masquerade. Also for the Agent Smith it should first be noted that it is a movie, but second it is important to note that people rejected the current Matrix as well. Agent Smith could easily have been exaggerating (or straight up lying) about how much previous systems were rejected in comparison to the current one. Either way considering the current one was rejected as well you must consider alternate possibilities for why it was rejected. My guess is simply because they know it is a lie on some level thus the questioning and eventual rejection.


As for the topic question I simply need only quote what fafyrd posted.
 

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Emile Durkheim identifies more of a golden mean kind of situation. He state that indeed life with an enormous amount of choices increases anomie, and this in extreme can lead to what he called anomic suicide. But that's not the whole story. If there is a lack of choice, that is depressing too, and that in three extreme may in turn lead to fatalistic suicide.

I'm going to stick to the theory that people want things, and they are happiest when they get those things, regardless of whether or not they were obatined with or without their free choice.
 

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I remember that video.

It requires more energy from us and it can be draining when expectations are high.

If we'd only have a limited choice we'd at least know where we're at.

But life's seemingly bigger now...

It's a tricky trap. I hope we can maintain a sense of realism. In every way. And I don't think there is one thing to blame for this. It's in our nature to be dreamers.
 
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