Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I had a thought about gaming just recently and I wanted to expand on the idea and see if anybody has anything to say about it.

I'll use Starcraft as an example throughout the post, but really any complicated game would work in it's place. If you are unfamiliar with this game, just bear with the first paragraph or skip it, the main point comes after.

A video game like Starcraft is extremely complex. There is so much to learn in order to become even a mediocre player, partially because it is so competitive, and partially because the game operates like a fast paced chess game. You constantly need to out think your opponent using the rules and timings within the given system. And the rules are many. Different unit combinations counter others, you need to know when and how to expand, you need to constantly be making judgments about the current tempo and flow of the game in order to effectively beat your opponent.

These are just a few examples. Really scores of other things need to be considered. Pages have been written about different strategies and tactics employed in the game in an effort to achieve perfect play.

The name for such a line of reasoning with a game like this is called "theory crafting". Basically you logically analyze a game in order to gain an advantage and divine the best possible strategy in any given situation.

Now it seems to me as though such a game would attract a more intelligent and active mind, simply because becoming adept at that game is no mundane task.

So a game like Starcraft may attract a more intelligent person. It takes their mind in and makes the rest of the world less appealing. When you get right down to it, logical analysis of a video game is not all that much different than the logical analysis of a math or science problem. This area may be open for dispute, but I really think there are many connections between the two.

If a system like a video game becomes more appealing than say scientific research, or some other complex aspect of the real world, then a person may play more than focus on real world problems, but still maintain the same satisfaction that they are achieving something worthwhile, creating a sort of quagmire for motivation and drive to focus on what is real.

Perhaps this is little more than a convoluted analysis of gaming addiction, but it is my argument that this is an (unintended) evil of modern video games.
 

·
黐線 ~Chiseen~
Joined
·
5,241 Posts
@theorycraft, you are summoned!

doesn't need to be starcraft... tetrinet carries on the same dynamics. it's tetris + multiplayer + special utility bombs.... it all falls down to whoever has the fastest hands, makes the quickest tetris, horde special blocks and BAM! insta-win!

But yea... with so many variables to carry out and the player adds on the dynamic and level of 'control', the outcome depends on the factors of concentration and quick thinking for starcraft... Micro your Macro... and all is good!


the true evil of gaming.... besides attempting to learn so much of the game, it doesnt help much in the overall picture of 'life' in general... i.e. in the presence of impending doom, the skill of starcraft will not save anyone nor let them know how to 'survive'... unless you count burrowing as an acquired skill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,394 Posts
My cousin is currently addicted to this game called Maplestory, a popular MMORPG based in Korea that is similar to WoW, except with 2D characters that are actually pretty cute (lol).
What you described sounds very much like him. He's so obsessed with the game, he just thinks about it, theorizes about it, and researches it constantly. It's ridiculous.
I try to not get too involved with video games, because it seriously distracts me from everything else. OTL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,641 Posts
A video game like Starcraft is extremely complex. There is so much to learn in order to become even a mediocre player, partially because it is so competitive, and partially because the game operates like a fast paced chess game. You constantly need to out think your opponent using the rules and timings within the given system. And the rules are many. Different unit combinations counter others, you need to know when and how to expand, you need to constantly be making judgments about the current tempo and flow of the game in order to effectively beat your opponent.
Hehe, adorable.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DemonD

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,669 Posts
@theorycraft, you are summoned!

doesn't need to be starcraft... tetrinet carries on the same dynamics. it's tetris + multiplayer + special utility bombs.... it all falls down to whoever has the fastest hands, makes the quickest tetris, horde special blocks and BAM! insta-win!

But yea... with so many variables to carry out and the player adds on the dynamic and level of 'control', the outcome depends on the factors of concentration and quick thinking for starcraft... Micro your Macro... and all is good!


the true evil of gaming.... besides attempting to learn so much of the game, it doesnt help much in the overall picture of 'life' in general... i.e. in the presence of impending doom, the skill of starcraft will not save anyone nor let them know how to 'survive'... unless you count burrowing as an acquired skill.
It's a good thing I'd never heard about this until just now. Or I'd have failed school.
 

·
黐線 ~Chiseen~
Joined
·
5,241 Posts
It's a good thing I'd never heard about this until just now. Or I'd have failed school.
I failed school because of Starcraft 1. (._.) But may I interest you in some rounds of Tetrinet? It's a dated game, however, it still plays and works marvelously. =)


mmm... I take that back... may have to open ports.. I just can't remember what ports are needed to be forwarded to allow proper play. it calls on certain port numbers ... be they ancient or legacy, but still ancient.. may interfere with bittorrent ports as well...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,669 Posts
I failed school because of Starcraft 1. (._.) But may I interest you in some rounds of Tetrinet? It's a dated game, however, it still plays and works marvelously. =)


mmm... I take that back... may have to open ports.. I just can't remember what ports are needed to be forwarded to allow proper play. it calls on certain port numbers ... be they ancient or legacy, but still ancient.. may interfere with bittorrent ports as well...
Not opening my ports for anybody, game or no game!

But thanx for the offer :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
I think this addresses the opposite of the problem. Yes, video games often contain far more interesting systems than those of the average person's life, but this isn't the fault of video games. Rather, it is the fault of society for not allowing people to discover and influence the systems of real life. After all, the world is full of systems of incredible complexity, the problem is just that people aren't encouraged or sometimes allowed to explore them, and are hardly ever allowed to modify them.
 

·
Cafe Legend and MOTM Jan 2011
Joined
·
15,420 Posts
Yes, most entertainment is a distraction from practical problem-solving. The same could be said of creating art or playing an instrument. There are skills to master that give a person a feeling of accomplishment. My argument against the idea that intellectually stimulating forms of entertainment waste otherwise creative minds is that such activities are often emotionally beneficial. When I play my flute, I am not doing it because practicing for hours gets me closer to ending world hunger or finding a cure for cancer. It isn't the means to any such end, and I know that.. I do it because it improves my mood, which energizes me. Being satisfied has value because it makes all of one's interactions more positive, which increases the total amount of joy in the world. Being in a good mood, when entertained in moderation, without it becoming an addiction, can keep the mind sharp for other things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,504 Posts
Dota 2, it's like a strategic 5v5 skirmish RPG game, except you're playing 5v5 and need to coordinate as a team.

Individually it's not as complex as Starcraft but when teamwork is taken into consideration, it's completely different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
StarCraft is an awesome game. Yes, it detracts time away from real life problems, but doesn't really any other hobby? If it weren't for the fact that it can cause addiction, it would actually be a good thing. It teaches problem solving, and mastery at something if you can get to Master's or Grandmaster's leagues. It is indeed complex, and something like macroing can come easier later in life, and if you play Zerg, deciding when to drone up and when to build an army does teach consequences of actions etc etc etc.

Some studies were done, and they found it interesting that Ps are more likely to play Zerg than any other race, and the least-played race is Random for Percievers, then Protoss, then Terran.
If anyone knows what I'm talking about...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,798 Posts
@qingdom I'm here and I'm queer and I will not disappear, thank you.

To me, life is just one giant game, encompassed by many smaller games, and then smaller ones, and on and on. We are all players in the game of life. Life is filled with single player games (reading a book), multiplayer games (hey lets all meet here for dinner!), cooperative games (marriage), games that require balance (giving/receiving gifts), and exploitative games (salesmen), and mutually beneficial games (i think scientific search falls under this one). In my mind, there is no distinction between tic tac toe, chess, physics, and people. They are all just systems with varying degrees of complexity. A high level Starcraft player has the cognitive abilities to understand physics, and vice versa. Both fields are training and developing the same abilities, but the results are different.

The leveraging point in the problem OP addressed comes in the form of incentive. Why does a student choose to train the same cognitive abilities through the median of video games rather than studying a text book or doing experiments? The answer lies in the speed of reinforcement. The iteration of video games, board games, puzzles converge soooooooo much faster than a scientific experiment. This is why playing a 15 min starcraft game is so much more appealing than watering my plant for science fair. More reinforcement = more fun. And everyone likes to have fun. This also allows for more chances for observation and analysis, and more attempts for problem solving. It's like power lifting for the brain, rather than a running marathon. It takes me 5 seconds to play 1 hand of poker, 5 seconds to review it, and 50 seconds to analyze and solve it. I am reinforced whether my play was correct or incorrect at a rate of once per minute. Multiply by that playing 4x tables, and you are getting about 400 hands per hour. The implication of speed in reinforcement is monumental. It means that someone who spends all their time playing video games is experiencing cognitive growth so much faster and more efficient than someone who spend their time attempting to make a breakthrough in science. If the education system want students focusing more on school rather than play, then they need to adjust their speed of reinforcement, because right now its slow as shit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I think this addresses the opposite of the problem. Yes, video games often contain far more interesting systems than those of the average person's life, but this isn't the fault of video games. Rather, it is the fault of society for not allowing people to discover and influence the systems of real life. After all, the world is full of systems of incredible complexity, the problem is just that people aren't encouraged or sometimes allowed to explore them, and are hardly ever allowed to modify them.
You do bring up a good point. But let's say school is the real life system in question. It takes years to complete school and a proportionally long time to see the result of any specific action you take. Like how starting to study a few weeks before your midterm can influence your overall gpa. You are allowed to manipulate variables within the system under your own power, but the cause and effect is not immediately observed.

For video games the opposite can be true much more often. You act quickly, make a move and can see instantaneously if you should have done it or not. In that sense, even if you were allowed to discover and change systems in real life, they may not have the same appeal as something within a game because it can be much more gratifying to see how your actions change things quickly.
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top