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"If there’s one thing Friedrich Nietzsche did well, it’s obliterate feel-good beliefs people have about themselves. He has been criticized for being a misanthrope, a subvert, a cynic and a pessimist, but I think these assessments are off the mark. I believe he only wanted human beings to be more honest with themselves.

He did have a remarkable gift for aphorism — he once declared, “It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book.” A hundred years after his death, Nietzsche retains his disturbing talent for turning a person’s worldview upside-down with one jarring remark.

Even today his words remain controversial. They hit nerves. Most of his views are completely at odds with the status quo.

Here are 40 unsympathetic statements from the man himself. Many you’ll agree with. Others you will resist, but these are the ones to pay the most attention to — your beliefs are being challenged. It’s either an opportunity to grow, or to insist that you already know better. If any of them hit a nerve in you, ask yourself why."

***

1. People who have given us their complete confidence believe that they have a right to ours. The inference is false, a gift confers no rights.

2. He that humbleth himself wishes to be exalted.

3. The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently.

4. There are no facts, only interpretations.

5. Morality is but the herd-instinct in the individual.

6. No one talks more passionately about his rights than he who in the depths of his soul doubts whether he has any.

7. Without music, life would be a mistake.

8. Anyone who has declared someone else to be an idiot, a bad apple, is annoyed when it turns out in the end that he isn’t.

9. In large states public education will always be mediocre, for the same reason that in large kitchens the cooking is usually bad.

10. The man of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies but also to hate his friends.

11. A casual stroll through the lunatic asylum shows that faith does not prove anything.

12. We often refuse to accept an idea merely because the way in which it has been expressed is unsympathetic to us.

13. No victor believes in chance.

14. Convictions are more dangerous foes of truth than lies.

15. Talking much about oneself can also be a means to conceal oneself.

16. It is not a lack of love, but a lack of friendship that makes unhappy marriages.

17. The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude.

18. The future influences the present just as much as the past.

19. The most common lie is that which one tells himself; lying to others is relatively an exception.

20. I counsel you, my friends: Distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful.

21. Rejoicing in our joy, not suffering over our suffering, is what makes someone a friend.

22. God is a thought who makes crooked all that is straight.

23. Success has always been a great liar.

24. Nothing on earth consumes a man more quickly than the passion of resentment.

25. What do you regard as most humane? To spare someone shame.

26. Whatever is done for love always occurs beyond good and evil.

27. When a hundred men stand together, each of them loses his mind and gets another one.

28. When one has a great deal to put into it, a day has a hundred pockets.

29. Whoever despises himself nonetheless respects himself as one who despises.

30. All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.

31. What is good? All that heightens the feeling of power, the will to power, power itself. What is bad? All that is born of weakness. What is happiness? The feeling that power is growing, that resistance is overcome.

32. Fear is the mother of morality.

33. A politician divides mankind into two classes: tools and enemies.

34. Everyone who has ever built anywhere a new heaven first found the power thereto in his own hell.

35. There is more wisdom in your body than in your deepest philosophy.

36. The mother of excess is not joy but joylessness.

37. The Kingdom of Heaven is a condition of the heart — not something that comes upon the earth or after death.

38. What is the mark of liberation? No longer being ashamed in front of oneself.

39. Glance into the world just as though time were gone: and everything crooked will become straight to you.

40. We should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once.

Source: 40 Belief-Shaking Remarks From a Ruthless Nonconformist | Raptitude.com






I've read and studied a lot of Nietschze, but I never got a good idea of WHAT kind of fellow he was in everyday life until I read this.

And now, I only wish he was still alive, my age, and liked boys.

EDIT: I underlined the part I thought were especially important, btw.
 

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Thanks for this awesome post. I haven't read any Nietschze but I'm planning on reading some of his work very soon.

I love quotes such as these that force people to be honest with themselves and examine their life. Today numbers 3/9 stood out for me, but I assure you a different one will stand out depending on what kind of day I had. I have to endure being surrounded by close-minded people in school everyday, but today was really ignorant. It seems like everyone hates anyone who is different. I certainly don't think that that's all the quote meant either. I'm surrounded by people who will only accept the orthodox and will only reject new ideas. You can't reject new ideas without first finding flaws or ways to refute it. You can't simply dismiss it because you stand so firm in your own belief.

P.S. Shouldn't this be in the philosophy forum?
 

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MOTM Nov 2010
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"If there’s one thing Friedrich Nietzsche did well, it’s obliterate feel-good beliefs people have about themselves. He has been criticized for being a misanthrope, a subvert, a cynic and a pessimist, but I think these assessments are off the mark. I believe he only wanted human beings to be more honest with themselves.

He did have a remarkable gift for aphorism — he once declared, “It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book.” A hundred years after his death, Nietzsche retains his disturbing talent for turning a person’s worldview upside-down with one jarring remark.

Even today his words remain controversial. They hit nerves. Most of his views are completely at odds with the status quo.

Here are 40 unsympathetic statements from the man himself. Many you’ll agree with. Others you will resist, but these are the ones to pay the most attention to — your beliefs are being challenged. It’s either an opportunity to grow, or to insist that you already know better. If any of them hit a nerve in you, ask yourself why."

***

1. People who have given us their complete confidence believe that they have a right to ours. The inference is false, a gift confers no rights.

2. He that humbleth himself wishes to be exalted.

3. The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently.

4. There are no facts, only interpretations.

5. Morality is but the herd-instinct in the individual.

6. No one talks more passionately about his rights than he who in the depths of his soul doubts whether he has any.

7. Without music, life would be a mistake.

8. Anyone who has declared someone else to be an idiot, a bad apple, is annoyed when it turns out in the end that he isn’t.

9. In large states public education will always be mediocre, for the same reason that in large kitchens the cooking is usually bad.

10. The man of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies but also to hate his friends.

11. A casual stroll through the lunatic asylum shows that faith does not prove anything.

12. We often refuse to accept an idea merely because the way in which it has been expressed is unsympathetic to us.

13. No victor believes in chance.

14. Convictions are more dangerous foes of truth than lies.

15. Talking much about oneself can also be a means to conceal oneself.

16. It is not a lack of love, but a lack of friendship that makes unhappy marriages.

17. The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude.

18. The future influences the present just as much as the past.

19. The most common lie is that which one tells himself; lying to others is relatively an exception.

20. I counsel you, my friends: Distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful.

21. Rejoicing in our joy, not suffering over our suffering, is what makes someone a friend.

22. God is a thought who makes crooked all that is straight.

23. Success has always been a great liar.

24. Nothing on earth consumes a man more quickly than the passion of resentment.

25. What do you regard as most humane? To spare someone shame.

26. Whatever is done for love always occurs beyond good and evil.

27. When a hundred men stand together, each of them loses his mind and gets another one.

28. When one has a great deal to put into it, a day has a hundred pockets.

29. Whoever despises himself nonetheless respects himself as one who despises.

30. All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.

31. What is good? All that heightens the feeling of power, the will to power, power itself. What is bad? All that is born of weakness. What is happiness? The feeling that power is growing, that resistance is overcome.

32. Fear is the mother of morality.

33. A politician divides mankind into two classes: tools and enemies.

34. Everyone who has ever built anywhere a new heaven first found the power thereto in his own hell.

35. There is more wisdom in your body than in your deepest philosophy.

36. The mother of excess is not joy but joylessness.

37. The Kingdom of Heaven is a condition of the heart — not something that comes upon the earth or after death.

38. What is the mark of liberation? No longer being ashamed in front of oneself.

39. Glance into the world just as though time were gone: and everything crooked will become straight to you.

40. We should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once.

Source: 40 Belief-Shaking Remarks From a Ruthless Nonconformist | Raptitude.com






I've read and studied a lot of Nietschze, but I never got a good idea of WHAT kind of fellow he was in everyday life until I read this.

And now, I only wish he was still alive, my age, and liked boys.

EDIT: I underlined the part I thought were especially important, btw.
I find that studying Nietzsche in a historical context provides much better understanding about his philosophies and why he is important.

However, my problem with Nietzsche is that his writing style lends itself to being grossly misinterpreted. Also, he often speaks of "morality", yet lacks an emphasis on consensus.

I feel that Sartre built upon and corrected the damage that Nietzsche philosophies bled into society. This was important as many people looked the other way during the 2nd World War and the genocide of 6 million Jews. Sure I know Nietzsche's words just got into the hands of a crazy man. But that is exactly my point. I don't like this when people start wars because of the bible either.

The world needed healing or at least an elaboration on "will to power". With Sartre God is still "dead", yet that only makes us more responsible to one another:

"We reach consensus by taking responsibility to construct our individual lives and values in a way that is responsible to the reality of the existence of others, and we decide/act as we would want others to as they take responsibility for my existence."
-Jean Paul Sartre
 

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Excellent post. Just great.

I must agree with you, I wish he were alive today.

"What is the mark of liberation? No longer being ashamed in front of oneself."
"The most common lie is that which one tells himself; lying to others is relatively an exception."

If people only knew what it means being objective to oneself, and then through such clarity the world would appear much more different, realizing the senselessness of egoistic strivings that have been glorified for centuries.

As Ouspensky said in "The Fourth Way":

"The most serious lying is when we know perfectly well that we do not and cannot know the truth about things and yet never act accordingly. We always think and act as though we knew the truth."
 

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I've never liked aphorisms. I heard them once described as cotton-candy philosophy: tastes good, but has no substance.

I used to be a fan of Neitzsche when I was in high school.
 

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I find that studying Nietzsche in a historical context provides much better understanding about his philosophies and why he is important.

However, my problem with Nietzsche is that his writing style lends itself to being grossly misinterpreted. Also, he often speaks of "morality", yet lacks an emphasis on consensus.

I feel that Sartre built upon and corrected the damage that Nietzsche philosophies bled into society. This was important as many people looked the other way during the 2nd World War and the genocide of 6 million Jews. Sure I know Nietzsche's words just got into the hands of a crazy man. But that is exactly my point. I don't like this when people start wars because of the bible either.

The world needed healing or at least an elaboration on "will to power". With Sartre God is still "dead", yet that only makes us more responsible to one another:

"We reach consensus by taking responsibility to construct our individual lives and values in a way that is responsible to the reality of the existence of others, and we decide/act as we would want others to as they take responsibility for my existence."
-Jean Paul Sartre
Sartre has been my favorite philosopher for years... I was introduced to both Sartre and Nietzsche during a course on "The Psychology of Self-Estrangement"... was my favorite of all of my post secondary courses...

Nietzsche is a close second for me though, I think he has A LOT to offer, although I agree that Sartre took alot of his work and improved on it greatly.

anyway... as for the 40, there were 3 that spoke to me...:
5. Morality is but the herd-instinct in the individual.
I have to suggest that in general yes, morality in general is very much "herd-instinct" however I think this is mainly due to the fact that most of western society's morals are based on a book and an outdated belief system.
I have an issue with blind faith, although if someone examines what their morals on, and make a decision that it is something worth up holding, then its not so much a herd instinct, but a true moral belief.
For example... when of the things that I am a strong advocate for in integrity, in the sense of what a person does when there is no chance of getting caught.
for example... I noticed today that I was paid an extra 2 hours on my paycheck... I will be contacting my supervisor and raising their attention to it... sure, 2 hours won't do serious damage to the company... and I could use the money, a lot... and it would never be noticed by anyone... but, it does show that I am trustworthy.

12. We often refuse to accept an idea merely because the way in which it has been expressed is unsympathetic to us.
30. All things are subject to interpretation. Whichever interpretation prevails at a given time is a function of power and not truth.

These 2 I added just because they stood out to me in the sense of how true I believe they are... I spend most of my time working with people dealing with perceptions and communication and how communication goes awry when both/all parties are not actively making an effort...

Anyway... thats it for me for now
 

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I like his writings on what he called "Master Morality" and "Slave Morality", but unlike him I consider what he denigrates as "Slave Morality" to be a good thing, a social advance to a more compassionate, just society.
 

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MOTM Feb 2010
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Adler picked up on N's will to power and made that the central focus of his psychology. Freud used a broad, social world view based on emotional energies. A brilliant man then recognized that these two disparate psychologies were actually two halves of a whole and generated an infinitely superior psychological system.

My point is, Nietzsche writes from a flagrantly imbalanced perspective that is utterly divorced from society. He poo-poo's society, morality and human interaction, he neglects to mention how much he is benefiting from these very things! Without the heard mentality, he'd be fighting for his life each day, instead of having the socially generated leisure of philosophy.

That being said, reading Nietzsche gives me shivers. I -love- his work.
 

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My point is, Nietzsche writes from a flagrantly imbalanced perspective that is utterly divorced from society. He poo-poo's society, morality and human interaction, he neglects to mention how much he is benefiting from these very things! Without the heard mentality, he'd be fighting for his life each day, instead of having the socially generated leisure of philosophy.
.
True xD
But that being said, I very much like Nietzsche.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Oh for sure you always gotta take peoples shit into account when reading things they say, but all in all I don't think he was all THAT pessimistic. I only mean this in the sense I don't think he was trying to be malicious or even say anything negative in regards about any of the topics he included in these quotes.... I think it was just a more innocent "this is what I've seen, and people have written books about it. Even though this is all it is. Think about it if you want."

I'm probably biased because he really does tug at my heart strings in terms of his outlook and things :p

I'm not even quite sure the exact thing I'm trying to describe, but I for sure like his work too so it doesn't matter much :p
 

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Originally, Neitzsche's philosophy was very attractive to me. It was around the high-school period of my life. As I got older, I realized that the will to power doesn't actually liberate people, it just puts more chains on them. Interestingly enough, the circumstances which power brings ultimately brings about a downfall. Stalin strove for power all his life and all it got him was an assassination. Hitler, for all the millions of people that praised his name, ended up blowing his brains out in a bunker. They once commanded huge armies but now the only people that honor their names are small, scattered groups of criminals. This proved to me one thing: you can strive for power all you want, but it's illusory. Power can be granted and taken away just like money. People can be made millionaires overnight or made paupers in the same timespan. I choose to put my faith in peace, which is at direct odds with power. The "will to power" is conquered by peace time and time again. The power of people like Stalin, Hitler, and Caesar fade fast when the charismatic leader dies. But the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Prince of Peace, has persisted for thousands of years. That's my two cents on the deal. Where does real power lie?

Although some of these are quite obvious and therefore quite agreeable.
 

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Most of these are obvious and some just have to be taken in the right context to understand them. This is coming from a guy who got a first on an essay about Nietzsche, so don't F with me fellas lol...

It's also funny number forty, and what I wrote in the NF guide to life thread. DANCE MORE OFTEN.
 

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Kevinaswell~ "If there’s one thing Friedrich Nietzsche did well, it’s obliterate feel-good beliefs people have about themselves. He has been criticized for being a misanthrope, a subvert, a cynic and a pessimist, but I think these assessments are off the mark. I believe he only wanted human beings to be more honest with themselves.

He did have a remarkable gift for aphorism — he once declared, “It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book.” A hundred years after his death, Nietzsche retains his disturbing talent for turning a person’s worldview upside-down with one jarring remark.

Even today his words remain controversial. They hit nerves. Most of his views are completely at odds with the status quo.

Here are 40 unsympathetic statements from the man himself. Many you’ll agree with. Others you will resist, but these are the ones to pay the most attention to — your beliefs are being challenged. It’s either an opportunity to grow, or to insist that you already know better. If any of them hit a nerve in you, ask yourself why." What I'm wonderin' is who wrote this?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Kevinaswell~ "If there’s one thing Friedrich Nietzsche did well, it’s obliterate feel-good beliefs people have about themselves. He has been criticized for being a misanthrope, a subvert, a cynic and a pessimist, but I think these assessments are off the mark. I believe he only wanted human beings to be more honest with themselves.

He did have a remarkable gift for aphorism — he once declared, “It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what others say in a whole book.” A hundred years after his death, Nietzsche retains his disturbing talent for turning a person’s worldview upside-down with one jarring remark.

Even today his words remain controversial. They hit nerves. Most of his views are completely at odds with the status quo.

Here are 40 unsympathetic statements from the man himself. Many you’ll agree with. Others you will resist, but these are the ones to pay the most attention to — your beliefs are being challenged. It’s either an opportunity to grow, or to insist that you already know better. If any of them hit a nerve in you, ask yourself why." What I'm wonderin' is who wrote this?
I included the source near the bottom of my OP, but apparently it was some fuck named David.

It was in an article for raptitude.com or something. Apparently it's a site to help people 'get better at being human', a pretty noble cause :p
 
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