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Discussion Starter #1
We kinda need this thread no ? Any tips would be nice

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Soop for the Soul
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It really depends on the person, but as a general rule, calculate your basal metabolic rate, and then figure out how much exercise you do. This will give you how many calories you burn per day. To gain weight you need to be in a caloric surplus, so add 150-500 calories, give it two months, see what happens, if you are gaining weight too fast drop the calories a little, if you are not gaining weight fast enough up the calories. It is crucial to give it time though. In addition most people want to gain weight, but having too high of body fat is not good, so try lifting weights or doing bodyweight bearing exercises at least 3 times a week. Protein is not as crucial for gaining weight as it is for cutting weight, as long as you are getting enough 1 gram per lb of lean body mass (your weight-your bodyfat weight) you should be fine. What is crucial is to get enough carbs, so that you have energy to do the weight-baring exercises you need to do to gain muscle. You should also expect to gain some fat, this is fine and to be expected, as long as its not mostly fat, you are fine.
 

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It's been theorized that people can have trouble gaining or losing weight because basal metabolic rate will adjust itself to maintain an arbitrarily designated "set point," which is why people can cut calories or increase calories and not experience any significant weight change. If such is the case you'll have to drastically increase your calorie input, which isn't exactly a "healthy" thing to do if your body intrinsically wants to maintain its current weight. Though if it's a matter of "feeling full and not wanting to eat" I'd recommend a focus on liquid calories with dry milk and/or protein supplements, in conjunction with whatever it is you normally prefer to eat the most. In addition it also helps to eat multiple meals a day with light snacks in between. You also might want to get a scale and count your calories as it's all too easy to overestimate how much you're actually eating.
 

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Soop for the Soul
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It's been theorized that people can have trouble gaining or losing weight because basal metabolic rate will adjust itself to maintain an arbitrarily designated "set point," which is why people can cut calories or increase calories and not experience any significant weight change. If such is the case you'll have to drastically increase your calorie input, which isn't exactly a "healthy" thing to do if your body intrinsically wants to maintain its current weight. Though if it's a matter of "feeling full and not wanting to eat" I'd recommend a focus on liquid calories with dry milk and/or protein supplements, in conjunction with whatever it is you normally prefer to eat the most. In addition it also helps to eat multiple meals a day with light snacks in between. You also might want to get a scale and count your calories as it's all too easy to overestimate how much you're actually eating.
It's true but it takes time to adapt, which is why bodybuilders cutting for shows throw in refeed days. It's usually fine if you gradually increase or decrease your calories and have cheat days occasionally.
 

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Swimming.
 
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It's true but it takes time to adapt which is why bodybuilders cutting for shows throw in refeed days. It's usually fine if you gradually increase or decrease your calories and have cheat days occasionally.
Taking "time to adapt" isn't really necessary to gain or lose weight, which is why if an overweight individual replicated the diet and exercise regimes used by contestants on The biggest loser they'd almost certainly lose weight. In terms of maintaining the ideal weight long term then the regimes incorporated by the contestants on the show were absolutely horrendous, as overnight they jumped into an extreme diet and exercise program that was virtually impossible for them to maintain, which is why almost all of the contestants would later regain the weight they previously lost, in part because their basal metabolic rates never adjusted to a typical person of their weight.

The OP didn't exactly specify one way or the other about a time frame or if the weight gain would be temporary or permenant; all they asked was for tips on how to gain weight. If it's a permanent alteration they're looking for then I absolutely agree that time is needed to adapt, because the focus then shifts from simply "eating more" to actually altering everyday habits through the utilization of behavior modification techniques.
 

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Mantaining certain proportions of micronutrients and lifting. 1.5 grams of protein per body weight for gains and 1.25 for maintence.
 
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Taking "time to adapt" isn't really necessary to gain or lose weight, which is why if an overweight individual replicated the diet and exercise regimes used by contestants on The biggest loser they'd almost certainly lose weight. In terms of maintaining the ideal weight long term then the regimes incorporated by the contestants on the show were absolutely horrendous, as overnight they jumped into an extreme diet and exercise program that was virtually impossible for them to maintain, which is why almost all of the contestants would later regain the weight they previously lost, in part because their basal metabolic rates never adjusted to a typical person of their weight.

The OP didn't exactly specify one way or the other about a time frame or if the weight gain would be temporary or permenant; all they asked was for tips on how to gain weight. If it's a permanent alteration they're looking for then I absolutely agree that time is needed to adapt, because the focus then shifts from simply "eating more" to actually altering everyday habits through the utilization of behavior modification techniques.
You misread
 

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I think that the best advice would come from a medical professional, but generally...

Don't consume too many extra calories. I'd say 500 is the max for most people. I like 250 (.5 lb/week).

You can technically eat whatever you want as long as your CI>CO, but you'll feel better if those calories are mostly from stuff that's good for you/unprocessed. However, there's nothing wrong with a cookie here and there.

I'm not sure the exact number, but I think that having an adequate amount of protein is good for muscle maintenance/growth. And I don't think that anyone really benefits from more than .9 g/lb body weight in any situation. Put the rest into carbs and fats.

For muscle growth, lifting is important.

Weigh yourself often and log calories into an app. If you have a food scale, use it always. However, if you think you may have an eating disorder, see your doctor. I think that how often you weigh yourself/religiously track calories is different depending on your current relationship with food.
 

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For many people increasing meal size can help. I've noticed that many people that have trouble gaining weight continuously eat tiny amounts during the day. This means that your digestive system is always busy and things get spread around.

If you stick to three meals a day and make sure you increase portion size to compensate for the amount of food you should eat for your ideal weight it should be easier.
As to how to force yourself to eat larger amounts at a time, that's mostly practice I guess? You've probably trained your stomach to expect a certain amount of food at a time, so that's when it tells you it's full. In the end, you're the boss of it. (just remember to treat it well)

Finally: If you suffer from an eating disorder: trust the math. Find your assigned weight in a table and follow it religiously. I think most people with eating disorders won't just follow advice like this on a forum though, so I'm mostly addit this for completion's sake
 

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Discussion Starter #13
For many people increasing meal size can help. I've noticed that many people that have trouble gaining weight continuously eat tiny amounts during the day. This means that your digestive system is always busy and things get spread around.

If you stick to three meals a day and make sure you increase portion size to compensate for the amount of food you should eat for your ideal weight it should be easier.
As to how to force yourself to eat larger amounts at a time, that's mostly practice I guess? You've probably trained your stomach to expect a certain amount of food at a time, so that's when it tells you it's full. In the end, you're the boss of it. (just remember to treat it well)

Finally: If you suffer from an eating disorder: trust the math. Find your assigned weight in a table and follow it religiously. I think most people with eating disorders won't just follow advice like this on a forum though, so I'm mostly addit this for completion's sake
My husband is 5'10 130lbs - he has problem gaining weight . What do you mean by eating disorder ? As in not able to eat consistently ?
It's extremely difficult for him to eat more than 2400 calories a day - and he works 12 hours shift .
He quitted smoking 5 years ago ( he used to be 126) so I guess that's the only thing that kinda worked-

Hmm he's very lazy to eat and those protein shakes makes him thinner for after drinking it he gets full

He does lift weigh and workout every other day





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Discussion Starter #14

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My husband is 5'10 130lbs - he has problem gaining weight . What do you mean by eating disorder ? As in not able to eat consistently ?
It's extremely difficult for him to eat more than 2400 calories a day - and he works 12 hours shift .
He quitted smoking 5 years ago ( he used to be 126) so I guess that's the only thing that kinda worked-

Hmm he's very lazy to eat and those protein shakes makes him thinner for after drinking it he gets full

He does lift weigh and workout every other day





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If he gets enough protein just from eating, he should try drinking a bunch of drinks that don't contain it. Stuff like juice doesn't fill people up as much because it's mostly sugar. However, too much sugar can be bad so I'd clear that with a doctor first.
 

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Oh god it's for my husband hahahaha
Thanks! Btw :)

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Does this low weight result in any measurable problems in his life, like "real" problems?

When I was 18 I was 6'-4" and weighed 125#, but I was healthy and didn't have any underlying problems. when I was 20 I was working a semi physical job, one that required frequent mild effort. It boosted my appetite and I gained some weight, but it was all muscle. I got up to about 135. I was able to do a 1 arm pull-up, and I could pickup and carry twice my own weight. It's not like I was weak, just thin. I maintained this +/- 10 pounds for all of my 20's. I got a less physical job at 35, but still stayed active in my free time. I put on another 10 pounds to 140-145, and it was all fat. Now I'm 44 and I have a desk job and not many physical activities in my free time, I average 145 now. I still have twice as much energy than my wife, and she is 6 years younger than me.

I've never been sickly, I've always has more stamina and strength (by weight) than any one I know, and I can eat what I want whenever I want without concern. I do watch my salt and sugar though for other health reasons (family predispositions).

It's hard to find clothing that fits me and I get cold easily in the winter, but other than that being thin isn't a "problem" that needs fixed.

When I've tried to gain weight earlier in life, all it did was suppress my appetite, and made me shit more.
 

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What do you mean by eating disorder ?
An eating disorder is a psychiatric condition where people use unhealthy eating patterns to try to have a sense of control in their lives. It's a common side-effect of a traumatic past, but can also happen in response to societal standards. You may know the form of anorexia nervosa, a common phenomenon where people starve themselves to try and get that 'perfect' body. It can get so bad for some people that they die from it.

As I said, I don't think it's likely to be relevant to your situation but I wanted to name it, just in case.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Does this low weight result in any measurable problems in his life, like "real" problems?

When I was 18 I was 6'-4" and weighed 125#, but I was healthy and didn't have any underlying problems. when I was 20 I was working a semi physical job, one that required frequent mild effort. It boosted my appetite and I gained some weight, but it was all muscle. I got up to about 135. I was able to do a 1 arm pull-up, and I could pickup and carry twice my own weight. It's not like I was weak, just thin. I maintained this +/- 10 pounds for all of my 20's. I got a less physical job at 35, but still stayed active in my free time. I put on another 10 pounds to 140-145, and it was all fat. Now I'm 44 and I have a desk job and not many physical activities in my free time, I average 145 now. I still have twice as much energy than my wife, and she is 6 years younger than me.

I've never been sickly, I've always has more stamina and strength (by weight) than any one I know, and I can eat what I want whenever I want without concern. I do watch my salt and sugar though for other health reasons (family predispositions).

It's hard to find clothing that fits me and I get cold easily in the winter, but other than that being thin isn't a "problem" that needs fixed.

When I've tried to gain weight earlier in life, all it did was suppress my appetite, and made me shit more.
He's been very thin his entire life- he's very energetic and athletic . He gained 10lbs throughout the 12 years that we have been together. He's never been sick and I think he looks fine. Even our family doctor say he's healthy. But he's been very depress about his weight and complains about it often . People had accused him of being a drug addict ( well they joked around that he looked like one and it offends him deeply) .

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Other than the toll this is taking on his mind, there is nothing wrong with him. Trying to fix it is a total waste of time, $$, and mental energy.

Ask him how many really old "fat" people he knows, and how many really old "thin" ones. Just look at the quality of life of the thin ones compared to the fat ones. I come from a long line of very long lived thin family, my great uncle lived to 107!

His body is a source of frustration and sadness, but it is a gift.

Tell him if he watches his diet and takes care of it, whatever it wants to be, it will served him very well for a very long time. Quit messing with it....
 
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