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how many of you INFPs wish to have this kind of 'freedom' lifestyle??

  • Me, definitely!!!

    Votes: 79 83.2%
  • hmm, well...it depends (pls explain below)

    Votes: 14 14.7%
  • Um...no, I like to settle-down kind of lifestyle :)

    Votes: 2 2.1%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
INFPs,
I'm really wondering, if is it just me, or actually many of you also really damn wish (& trembling!) to NOT stay stuck at one place on Earth, and instead just go travel around the world, and basically be FREE, to live, stay, work, and play whenever you are, while always cherishing new experiences, making new friends, and basically, experiencing VARIETY of life ???

At least tell me that I'm not crazy that recently, as I get older (I'm now 28), this thought even bombarded me much and much louder than the conventional 'settle-down' idea (ie: have a STABLE job, get married quick, have kids, raise 'em, work THERE till u get old, basically the 'normal' expectations of parents & society) !

If you do, and especially for those of you who actually ARE doing it right now, my urgent questions now are:

1. HOW did you able to do it? or what to DO (or prepare) basically to have that sort of always-fun and exciting life?
is there a very general step-by-step things to do/prepare??

2. It doesn't necessarily have to do/deal with working or getting transferred in "normal REAL corporate" high-paid 9-to-5 jobs, right?.. and also, it doesn't necessarily always require you to have LOTS of money in your bank right, to be able to DO this thing/sort of "moving-around" mobile lifestyle?...
I mean, from what I gather, it could be as simple as teaching English, teaching music/piano (this is a very preferable path for me also, IF it's any possible!! :happy: ), or teach surfing, or heck, a Western friend of mine even said along this line: "don't worry about finding job. just hop in first (to the overseas country of ur choice), and THEN make friends/networking, and from there you will start finding info about jobs, even COOLEST jobs you might never imagine before!"

3. What about all the 'practicalities' that often are spouted by more-pragmatic kind of people to be "unrealistic to dream about it" , such as: where to stay/live, VISA and extension thingy, issue with government/law there with foreigners, etc etc ?? how did/do you work around those seemingly 'hindering block' practical issues??


Well, I guess that's it for now, I'll add more along the way!
in the mean time, really hope to hear about your opinions (or advices) on this topic, guys! :happy:
really wish this thread would go into longer-pages and interesting discussions!
Basically, just treat this particular thread as "all-about-traveling-and-living-FREELY-around-the-world" idealistic conversations and discussions! :laughing:
 

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Yes, when I get out of school, I plan to go around the world taking different kinds of jobs wherever I go, on a trip of wonder, self-discovery, and interesting resume-building. Ha.
 

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Oh yes indeed. But I'm lazy and am still sitting here after four years after deciding the idea. All this time I've kept my life so I can more or less cut myself loose on a whim, except a whim to leave is usually flooded with fear or doubt as well. For me though, the journey isn't just a vacation journey but hopefully a journey into a new beginning or a new path I never considered. My previous lack of interest for particular countries was down to an attempt from the traveller websites to appeal to the Se in me which is almost negligible.

As I'm still here I don't know if my answers would be much good outside of the usual self-help advice but I'll try my best. My favourite websites are lonelyplanet.com and gapyear.com (though its British orientated it is very useful. Probably one of the best websites for travellers in existence today perhaps.)

1) In my experience of planning, one of the biggest factors I have found from travellers is to plan less, not more. Fear wants you to plan more and remove all doubt, but we are P's after all, being spontaneous and going to the flow is important. Many online guides say you must single out what you don't need rather than what you do. A traveller I spoke to online said to me that all you need to take with youis what you can fit into your own head and what you can fit into your backpack. The first 48 hours in a new country are the make-or-break stage, survive them and you should be fine. After travelling for a little while its said to become a piece of cake, just remember when your visa intends to expire so you can move to another country. Decide the fun as you go, you are free after all. For example in the movie "The Beach" the main character meets two other strangers and goes on a long journey with them with no prior planning. I would suggest bringing a picture or image book as well e.g of a bed, meal, drink etc. Saves a lot of problems with language difficulty. If you will plan beforehand though, just do a bit of finance checking (if its your forte) and maybe ask online to travellers how far it could take you and plan around that. I did mine and I'm completely useless with money!

2. Apparently it's quite easy to find jobs, I've been told its possible to teach English in China without a degree for instance. Some people suggest keeping an internet connection the whole time so you can maintain social connections. You may find opportunity entirely from word or mouth or just stumble across them.

3. This falls under point 1, it's gotta be the hardest thing not to plan too much but you can find a list of traveller's hostels on most internet websites, or e-mail the embassy and they should help too. As for Visas, if I'm not mistaken they are easy to get hold of in the form of a tourist Visas, especially SE Asia. They love the tourist economy really and they want tourists to keep coming and keep spending so its usually easy on the tourist trails. I believe you can apply for Visas in neighbouring countries at ease due to the above principle. The only practical issue is money but that can be generated by finding money through working tourist visas. Most LEDC countries are relatively cheaper in terms of living costs so your money will go further. Australia, Europe or North America are more difficult for obvious reasons and Japan can be a bit tricky too so if you are going to plan, put aside a fair amount of your budget if you want to spend a lot of time in these places.

Aww, if you do plan to go then enjoy yourself! People travel into their 40s or 50s as well, you're not too old at all. :)
 

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hmm, well...it depends (pls explain below)
I like to have somewhere to come back to.
 

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Oh man I've always wanted to do this. In high school, my friend and I said we would become nomads together after college and travel the world. But now he's going to school for like 10 years to become a doctor and then has to serve 4 years in the military after that. So yeah, thats not happening for a while now, if at all. :sad:
 

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I want to see the world, I would like to be traveler for a living, I would never be bored. This planted is so beautiful and there are so many wonders to see in this world but one lifetime seams to be too short to explore or see it all and it makes me sad.
 

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chrisguillebeau.com/

k thx bai
 

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Yes...this was always my dream, since I was a teenager.....to lead a sort of bohemian nomadic lifestyle. I've always had a sense of never belonging where I am, and I'm not sure if any place could cure that restlessness, but I'd like to find out...

I admit I've let "what-if" fears, family pressure, and other responsibilities hold me back. I have little interest in "career" now as I took a stab at that & business leaves me cold. I don't want children or a cozy life in the suburbs. I would like to marry, but more to have someone to be close to, to share life & thoughts with. I think I would have more courage to do this if not entirely alone. I'm normally very independent & do a lot alone, but I have yet to get the mindset to do this alone. I think it's because I really would like to share it with someone.
 

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YES! This is my dream...one I still hope will come true. I am so fascinated by Europe and all that is has to offer. I've been fortunate to do some traveling, enough to get the bug and want more, more, more!!! If I had it my way I'd pack the necessities of life into a backpack, hop on the train and travel across all of Europe, talking amongst the locals, avoiding all things touristy and just immersing myself in the different cultures.
 

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I'm actually already getting ready to leave next year to a long-term trip throughout South America. It's really not that difficult. You just need the why, where, who and how before deciding if it's something for you.

The WHY: Why do you want to travel? Is it too escape from reality, society, family pressure? Or is it because you're passionate about traveling? Do you get goosebumps from just thinking about it, and impatient of getting on the road despite the obvious disadvantages of this type of life-style?

The WHERE: Once you ponder of why you want to undertake such expedition and the ulterior motive behind the decision, you need to figure out where to go. I would recommend by starting little by little(such as backpacking around the vicinity of your location and figuring out if it's something you would enjoy.) After a bit of a practice, you can plan a bigger journey to a place that you want, taking into consideration the cultural, political, and economical situations of where you're planning to go.

The WHO: It is important to determine if you're going to go solo or with a companion. There are obvious advantages and disadvantages of doing both. Basically, going by yourself entails that you are in charge of your itinerary and are free to roam where ever your heart desires. You can stay for a short or long period on a place without worrying that your partner doesn't agree with the idea. You make your own decisions, but also you are at the mercy of your own common-sense. The disadvantages mount to feelings of loneliness and despair and this might ruin your trip making you want to return to the safeties of your home. Also, with a companion it is possible that the other will give you a different perspective as to what direction to take and this may make a difference in the quality of your trip.

The HOW: Now, the practical question as to how you're going to make this into a reality surfaces into the equation. How exactly are we going to pay for this trip? What should I pack in my bag? Do I need visas to the countries I'm planning to visit? What security precautions do I need to take while on the road? What sacrifices do I need to make in order to make this into a reality? In my opinion, the hardest thing to achieve is getting the money to go, since this means rearranging the way you manage your expenses.

For further information, I've found this forum very helpful for these kinds of questions. I hope you get to go, and hopefully I'll see some of you on a cavern drinking beer and sharing our wild traveling stories:tongue:

Good luck
 
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This has always been my dream too! Since I was about 18 I remember thinking I couldn't think of anything more boring than settling down, buying a house, having kids etc. I think I essentially have a gypsy soul and have always wanted to live overseas and travel.

I did live my dream to some extent a few years ago when I took the plunge and went on a working holiday in the UK.... It was terrifying going alone, but I was determined to make it work and ended up finding a job in London. It was like a revelation. For the first time in my life, I felt truly alive, that I was completely free to be myself and finally living the life I had imagined. It was brilliant and wonderful, but.... yes, here's the but... I was only able to stay for two years and wasn't able to extend my visa. The reality of being 'forced' to return home and leave behind a life and people I loved hit me very hard.

Having said that, I still believe in dreams and am holding onto the hope that I can one day return to the UK or have the opportunity to work in another country. I am forever and always keeping my options open! :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
practicality, practicality, and practicality

This has always been my dream too! Since I was about 18 I remember thinking I couldn't think of anything more boring than settling down, buying a house, having kids etc. I think I essentially have a gypsy soul and have always wanted to live overseas and travel.
just wondering,
did the gypsies back then also like to to travel around the world? (but NOT with lots of cash,.right?)
because if they did, then I just knew that damn, I AM a modern gypsy! lol :D

I did live my dream to some extent a few years ago when I took the plunge and went on a working holiday in the UK.... It was terrifying going alone, but I was determined to make it work and ended up finding a job in London. It was like a revelation. For the first time in my life, I felt truly alive, that I was completely free to be myself and finally living the life I had imagined. It was brilliant and wonderful, but.... yes, here's the but... I was only able to stay for two years and wasn't able to extend my visa. The reality of being 'forced' to return home and leave behind a life and people I loved hit me very hard.

Having said that, I still believe in dreams and am holding onto the hope that I can one day return to the UK or have the opportunity to work in another country. I am forever and always keeping my options open! :laughing:
see the bolded words:

1. How did you end up finding a job in London?
was it through friends/networking? or some job-search at home?
and also, was it BEFORE you got there, or AFTER you put ur feet there first?
this job-to-fund-the-cost-of-living thing is what I'm still confused on how to solve it..because I feel that once I know how to do this, or with the right mindset already, then there's probably *nothing* going to stop me from attaining this kind of lifestyle!

2. What happened with the visa thing? if you're already found a job and able to work there, then why you just can't stay longer? what's the main reason?
is it because of the VISA thing?
or government's law or regulation in that country about foreigners working? or...?

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And another very important question to all of you is about the Money thing.
Tell me, that though it definitely requires some sort of savings-money to be able to afford this kind 'nomadic-travel-around' lifestyle, but it doesn't necessarily have to be with a LOT of cash in our savings right?

I mean, I'm sure you know what I mean, and have heard many typical 'normal' people saying things like:
"well, to travel around, you do NEED a lot of money! there's no way out! so that's WHY you need to take those REAL high-paying corporate jobs, so you can afford to go traveling ONCE A YEAR, during ur VACATION company time!"

But,..I somehow always feel that these people are missing the point!
'cuz for me personally, I don't want THAT kind of lifestyle: ie: slaving myself to typical "real high-paid 9-to-5 corporate jobs" while sucking my soul away, and THEN having like perhaps only one or two-weeks of vacation to go YIPEEEE traveling,..only to then goes back to the dreadedness of "normal life" again!
umm....No way! :confused:

What I really want is the EVERYDAY-ADVENTURE kind of lifestyle, traveling to one place (at low-cost!), then work there, and then after say like 3-4 months, go to another city/country, find work again, meet new friends & interesting cultures and places, stay for say 5-6 months, then go to another city/country again, and so on!

Now my question is: is this feasible?
again, how much money is usually required to be able to start doing the latter thing?

Would love to see discussion on this!
 
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I would if I could have a companion. Don't get me wrong travelling the world has always been a huge fantasy, I'm just to shy and hesitant to do anything on my own. Frankly once I got there I wouldn't know what to do with myself.
 

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I've lived in Brazil and Spain, one for school and the other teaching English. I think teaching is a great way to go. If I were to travel again I would go to Costa Rica. But being as sensitive as I am, I can't get past the fact that people treat me differently when they know I am not from there, and it is harder to get to know people.
 

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hi niki,

to answer your questions...

1. I had a hard time finding a job in London initially. I planned to work as an occupational therapist and had gone through lots of planning before leaving (spent a year before planning it all and signing up with agencies etc), but when I arrived there were no OT jobs at the time! So, I just tried to be really resourceful and started applying for Heaps of retail jobs (only other thing I had a bit of experience in) and randomly ended up getting a job that way. So basically just lots of internet searches, job websites etc etc and also literally just going into shops to give them my CV. Partially luck, partially sheer perseverance!
Like you, I'm also trying to work out what the best job is for funding the whole travelling gypsy thing... I don't think OT is it haha.


2. I only had a working holiday visa, which was for 2 years but I could only work for one of those years. When my visa's expiry date was looming I tried desperately to get a work permit (where you have to get a permanent job and your employer is wiling to sponsor you) but they've cracked down so much on immigration in the UK you have to have seriously impressive professional skills and experience to get one. I also looked into other visas but just couldn't meet the criteria due to age / finances etc etc. Every country is different though I guess. But yeah, this is the very frustrating part as even if you want to live somewhere the ol' red tape can be a huge hinderance.

3. In terms of the money thing... I did save up quite a lot before leaving. It definitely comes in handy to have a healthy bank balance as before I found a job I had to rely on those savings. But a huge amount isn't necessary - just as long as you have Something to fall back on. For working holiday visas (which you can get if you're under 30) you generally need about $5000 or so.

I agree that the idea of slaving away 9-5 and just having a few weeks holidays a year sounds dreadful. I think life can be better than that... but maybe it just takes a while to figure out the best way to do it!?? I'll warn you that it's also harder to achieve the travelling lifestyle when you are over 30 because then you can't even get a working holiday visa.. really sucks and I think is rather ageist!
 
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