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I am wondering if any other 1s feel like they are frequently inhibited in areas of creativity and self-expression, and has anyone learned how to deal with this?

Yesterday I was glancing over some googlebooks and ran into a psychoanalytical study of a child whose problems were very strikingly similar that of type 1 and many of them resonated with my own childhood, particularly this piece:
It became apparent that Andy's urgent need to be "an oxymoron", that is, an original, also contributed to this disavowel of feelings, and further inhibited his capacity to name them and understand them; his ideal was his caricature of his father who was so remarkably unflappable. The same narcissistic pressure impeded verbalization and thought in other arenas. Its impact in regard to his academic performance was onerous, because he was unable to rest until he was sure that he was producing work that was extraordinary. His parents reported that anytime anything "special" was called for in school, even something as banal as an "interesting sentence" using a new spelling word, Andy would fall into an anxious and paralyzed state that extended the activity for hours. While he demanded his parent's presence, he could not use them to brainstorm, since any input from others immediately threatened his originality. The fragility of his ideas and his sense of ownership was so great that Andy could not use an adult's mind as scaffolding for his own invention.
entire write up
This struggle with creativity on the surface sounds 4-ish but the core issue is that of type 1: to produce an outstanding piece of work of your own authorship. Many times I've struggled with the same kind of paralysis, feeling that I have to come up with something original and outstanding, and in cases when I have been unable to do it just opting out of expressing myself completely and remaining mute. Similarly to Andy I've rejected outside input because I felt that if it wasn't coming from me, then it wasn't real, it wasn't an expression of who I am but instead a shallow mimicry of other people: if I incorporated their ideas then it felt like I was being fake, inauthentic. On the down side I feel that this constant "sticking to my guns" led to certain degree of intellectual impoverishment, since there is only so much you can experience and think up on your own without using input from the outside.

What do other 1s think of this? Do you feel like you often have creativity blocks even over the insignificant assignments? If so, how do you overcome this?
 

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I have noticed this when it comes to assignments, anything that was a forced task or something to present that produced any type of expectations then my creativity would be impeded. Yet, when it was not forced when it was due to inspiration whether in art, writing, photography, etc. then I was able to produce things that even I didn't think I am capable of. I think part of it is was the pressure of producing something "perfect" but "new" at the same time and the other part was the self-consciousness and the idea of being judged on it. Also maybe the idea of not accepting help has to do with integrity and producing one's own work.

I think this is overcome with not focusing on the expectations of oneself or others. One can take ideas externally but how they are put together can be new and shows off creativity.
 

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I cannot say that I've experienced anything similar in the way of a desire for creativity and upholding authenticity besides art. When I create art I stop taking pride in what others have forced me to modify. I think a large part of it is how much pride you have in your decision making, be it art or something else. The idealistic vision and desire for control in results of work to aligned with this I could see amplifying this protectiveness of work. Whenever I become incredibly critical of myself I am fiercely protective of decision making and I am reluctant to allow anyone to make decisions for me or try to persuade me away from decisions I know to be right.

The jury is still out on the tritype idea, but I'm yet to be given a theory that stands up to criticism without changing my knowledge on the core type's effect on an individual.

I would say that I only gain such feelings when I am doing something artistic, otherwise it never applies.
 

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I can relate to this a lot; however, instead of becoming paralyzed, I become determined and continue to strive until it feels right. Almost nothing is comparable to the satisfaction gained from that "right" feeling. It's pure expression.
 
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I have a strong desire to create, but it must absolutely be amazing and fresh and, dare I say, perfect.

Needless to say, I have not created much in the past 5 years. -_-
 

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I am wondering if any other 1s feel like they are frequently inhibited in areas of creativity and self-expression, and has anyone learned how to deal with this?

Yesterday I was glancing over some googlebooks and ran into a psychoanalytical study of a child whose problems were very strikingly similar that of type 1 and many of them resonated with my own childhood, particularly this piece:
It became apparent that Andy's urgent need to be "an oxymoron", that is, an original, also contributed to this disavowel of feelings, and further inhibited his capacity to name them and understand them; his ideal was his caricature of his father who was so remarkably unflappable. The same narcissistic pressure impeded verbalization and thought in other arenas. Its impact in regard to his academic performance was onerous, because he was unable to rest until he was sure that he was producing work that was extraordinary. His parents reported that anytime anything "special" was called for in school, even something as banal as an "interesting sentence" using a new spelling word, Andy would fall into an anxious and paralyzed state that extended the activity for hours. While he demanded his parent's presence, he could not use them to brainstorm, since any input from others immediately threatened his originality. The fragility of his ideas and his sense of ownership was so great that Andy could not use an adult's mind as scaffolding for his own invention.

This struggle with creativity on the surface sounds 4-ish but the core issue is that of type 1: to produce an outstanding piece of work of your own authorship. Many times I've struggled with the same kind of paralysis, feeling that I have to come up with something original and outstanding, and in cases when I have been unable to do it just opting out of expressing myself completely and remaining mute. Similarly to Andy I've rejected outside input because I felt that if it wasn't coming from me, then it wasn't real, it wasn't an expression of who I am but instead a shallow mimicry of other people: if I incorporated their ideas then it felt like I was being fake, inauthentic. On the down side I feel that this constant "sticking to my guns" led to certain degree of intellectual impoverishment, since there is only so much you can experience and think up on your own without using input from the outside.

What do other 1s think of this? Do you feel like you often have creativity blocks even over the insignificant assignments? If so, how do you overcome this?
1. I've never felt inhibited in the areas of creativity and self-expression, so it's not an issue I've had to deal with.

2. I can't say I've ever felt the "anxious and paralyzed" state described in Andy's case. Personally, I struggle more with the follow-through than the conceptualization. Coming up with unique and original ideas is usually easy for me. But imagining a 400 page novel and then sitting down to write it-- oh, boy!

As to outside input-- it depends. I tend to listen to other people's input because I find that although their specific idea in and of itself is worthless, the thought behind it has the ability to spark my imagination and let me create something even better. Other people become an unspoken soundboard for my thoughts.

For me, art has a certain-- "gut instinct" accompanying it, for lack of a better phrase. Things fit and things don't. Because of this, I am very self-assured when it comes to creative decisions. I know what to toss out and what to keep. It's funny, because I use the same "gut instinct" when writing. I can't tell you what an adverb is, or why a comma goes in one place and an apostrophe in another. I just know where they go. It's like breathing; it's purely instinctual and requires no thought or reason behind it. It feels right.

Much of my creative work follows this "gut instinct." I can't really explain it any better than that. If it helps any, I make a terrible tutor (because saying "the comma goes there because that's where the sentence needs to breathe" doesn't really jive with confused students) but an excellent editor (because I know what is excess and what is not).

3. Although I think Andy's story is interesting, it doesn't apply to me on a personal level.

4. I don't usually suffer "creative blocks" over small assignments.


Hmm... perhaps my answers are not as helpful as I originally thought.


EDIT: On another note, I do and don't struggle with a sense of perfectionism. When I am heavily invested in a project, I work hard to make sure every kink is ironed out before I step back and call it "finished." To that end, I can be a bit of a perfectionist. But I am never so perfectionistic that I become obsessed-- and lose sight of the end goal. I am comfortable stepping back from a project and saying "hey, it might not be perfect, but it's my personal best and I'm pleased with the results."
 

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I am not a 1, but it doesn't surprise me that you are experiancing this in yourself because 1s after all, are in the Instintive Triad, which means your underlying emotion is rage, and the way 1s deal with that is through repression. This may be significant to you because you may be so used to repressing that you have even been repressing other things besides your anger. Often times unconscious behaviors like that overflow from one place in your life to another without you even knowing it has happened. I think an important thing for you to do would be to begin working on however it is your are repressing yourself, not just in your creativity, but also in other areas or emotions of your life, because like I said, some health in one area will over flow and begin to spread itself to other areas of your life. Hope this makes sense. Sometimes I have great ideas, but am not soo good with my words.
 

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I can't say I've experienced anything in the OP. I've been into art since I was very young, and I still draw occasionally. It came easily to me. However, I did notice that my One-ness may be getting in the way when I'm being graded on a piece of art. If you put my graded work and my sketches side by side, it looks like they were drawn by two different people. My art teacher described my graded pieces as "tired." I was so concerned with straight lines and perfect form that they looked boring. My sketches, on the other hand, were full of life and interesting marks. When I have a time limit, I have to be unrestrained in how I draw. There isn't enough time to nit-pick. Left to my own devices, however, I'm so afraid I'll ruin the picture that I'm too controlled. I wonder if any other Ones experience this.

Marlowe said:
For me, art has a certain-- "gut instinct" accompanying it, for lack of a better phrase. Things fit and things don't. Because of this, I am very self-assured when it comes to creative decisions. I know what to toss out and what to keep. It's funny, because I use the same "gut instinct" when writing. I can't tell you what an adverb is, or why a comma goes in one place and an apostrophe in another. I just know where they go. It's like breathing; it's purely instinctual and requires no thought or reason behind it. It feels right.
That's how it is for me too. I'm not so sure that it's related to being a gut type, though. I think all people who do enough art eventually internalize these aspects of composition. You might be onto something about writing though, as it's a little bit different.
 

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That's how it is for me too. I'm not so sure that it's related to being a gut type, though. I think all people who do enough art eventually internalize these aspects of composition. You might be onto something about writing though, as it's a little bit different.
When I said "gut instinct," I wasn't referring to being a gut type. I was just explaining how I go about being creative-- instinctually. I can see how the mistake could be made, though.
 

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I have issues similar to Andy's. I want so badly for my work to be perfect, to flawlessly convey what I want to be conveyed that I just become paralyzed by this fear that what I may produce will not measure up. That I will fail myself. Or worse yet, that I will do badly in the eyes of others (that's worse because their expectations tend to be lower than mine). Then I fall into horrible procrastination and when or if I do complete it, even if it is good, I never feel that is good enough. That's almost worse than not having it completed.

I can only think of one or two times ever when I wasn't completely unsatisfied with my work (one was a poem, the other prose). I was forced to complete both because they were assignments. I wrote them when I was in a sort of frenzied and inspired or meditative and inspired state. During those times, I wasn't aware for anything outside of myself, just on the feelings, thoughts, where I was in my mind, and words. I did not think about food or drink and wouldn't eat or drink until I finished. Being in such states can be difficult, so I try to find a happy medium where I can write when in inspired states but still can go back to the daily necessities, even if the work has yet to be completed.
 
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