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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If there is already a thread on this then please let me know.

I've been reading Eckhart Tolle's 'The Power of Now', which talks about being in the present moment and letting go of the past and the future.

I was wondering if certain personality types would find staying present and not getting caught up in thought easier than other types?

From what I've read and understood (which is very limited), Sensing is about being in the moment and seeing detail and Intuition is about ideas and seeing the bigger picture (is my understand right?). Which makes me conclude that someone with Se and Si dominant funcations would have an easier time staying present, not over-thinking things, taking life one step at a time.

Or...is over-thinking not related to type, but just the human condition?

All thoughts and opinions are welcome.
 

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Staying present isn't to do with functions, but it can make one appear to be more of a sensor. I say that as a dominant intuitive who is often typed as a dominant sensor since assuming a more spiritual life.

In general humans think too much and overcomplicate things, no matter type.

Staying present is really more to do with actively observing what is going on in your own mind, not getting caught up in the drama, remembering you're the actor, not the character.

That means the drama still exists, you just don't get stuck in a loop where you can't get out.

So this could also make one appear to be more extraverted, since introverted functions are more likely to have you in a loop.

Overall I wouldn't say the two things aren't directed related but do seem to show some correlation.
 

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I don't think I've ever been "in the moment", not once. Perhaps I might be if someone that I cared for was in danger, or if I were being threatened with something that legitimately frightened me -- I don't know. I suppose that I'll find out someday.
 

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In my experience, Sensors are better at living in the moment than Intuitives. I don't think I naturally live in the moment. I'm really, really daydreamy and have sort of adapted my lifestyle to that. Most of my life happens not in the moment. I'm an out-of-the-moment person. I personally don't actually see how living more in the moment could benefit me, as an individual.
 

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It depends what kind of 'in the moment' you mean, as well as whether you mean being 'in the moment' by default, or choosing to be 'in the moment'...For me, being in the moment can either be being totally attuned to what's going on around me, or being totally attuned to what's going on in my head, or both at once. Being introverted & intuitive I process in my head and live in my head sometimes, but this could count as 'being in the moment', being self-aware, watching one's own reactions to things etc.

I do take life one step at a time mostly - or I try to plan and fail miserably, usually by missing the deadline for having decided what to do, and end up just figuring out what to do 'in the moment'.

I think naturally I am quite 'in the moment', but that 'moment' is partly what's going on around me, and partly what's going on internally. I've had to learn to be strict about planning to make time to do some things, e.g. to make dinner, because otherwise dinner will happen at midnight, because I have been toddling on 'in my moment' all evening!

Which makes it seem like being in the moment could be partly tied up with the spontaneity of perceivers? My J friends are not at all 'in the moment' most of the time; they are always planning the next thing or dissecting the last thing. Though a couple of them are very religious and therefore have very defined, scheduled times for 'being in the moment' spiritually. Whereas I will 'be in the moment' by default sometimes, and by conscious choice at other times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When I say 'in the moment' what I mean is what Tolle means when he says 'presence' a.k.a - 'mindfulness'. Not letting your mind be full of thoughts, of what's going to happen an hour, a day, a week, a month etc from now. Or what happened in the past. But just being present and focused purely on what is happening right now.
 

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Mind not full of thoughts of what was, what may be, what will be, what has been, and what's going on right now, all the time?

No idea what that's like.... How do you even DO that? I mean, and not be utterly bored and distracted?
 

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Mind not full of thoughts of what was, what may be, what will be, what has been, and what's going on right now, all the time?

No idea what that's like.... How do you even DO that? I mean, and not be utterly bored and distracted?
 

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It depends a lot on what you mean by "in the moment". And I don't think any cognitive function alone automatically makes someone more or less prone to being in the moment. There are so many other factors, like anxiety levels or temperament or culture and lifestyle.

--My mother is an ISFP and she is never really "in the moment",because she is always preoccupied with worries about the chores she has to take care of, etc. So she's thinking about CURRENT problems, but it is still distracting her from the world around.

--My father is an ISTJ and you could not get him OUT of the moment if you tried. He absolutely insists on staying focused on what's happening at all times. He does not dwell much on the past and rarely ever talks about the future. I believe this is how he feels secure, and he also doesn't want to delve into emotional stuff which he's terrible at coping with.

--My ESFJ friend has a strong tendency to lose herself in her head, worry about things, dwell on the past, get ahead of herself --- but she has gotten good at INTENTIONALLY living more in the moment and enjoying things as they happen. Sometimes she has to remind herself and ground herself again.

--My ISTP friend is very much in the moment, does not have a lot of worries about the future, nor tendency to dwell on the past. However, he does seem to focus on *specific* things in the moment, like he easily tunes out what isn't interesting to him and he does have a lot of hobbies and interests that he revisits often in conversation, but like... only as the topics happened to pop into his head again right then and there. I don't know why but he does happen to have very low levels of anxiety, so I'm sure that helps.

I'm an INFP and I am NEVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! in the moment. I am ALWAYS thinking about the past or the future or some... creative, weird, daydreamy type thing. I am oblivious to my surroundings, I've made a concentrated effort at times to actually just notice what is going on around me and I get so bored and antsy so quickly...

I'm trying to think of any N's I know who are "in the moment" and so far I can't but I'm sure they exist. I'm just surrounded by far more S's than N's.
 

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I'd say Se types are more grounded in the present than others. But that's based on personal observations and limited understanding of a cog function I don't use much of.
 

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I never read his book, but I would assume that what he means by "the power of now" is of doing things right now instead of tomorrow or the next day.

It's about taking advantage of this very moment that we have right this moment and ignoring the past and future since they don't exist?

And so if you want something, you don't say "okay, let me put that in my calendar," but rather you start doing it and working towards it from day one. Not: "Oh, yeah, one day I want to do that." but rather "let me start working on that right now so that that day will actually come."

Or?


But, again, I didn't read his book. I assume it doesn't have to do with Se, though. Because that would be silly.
 
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