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I've always found myself disliking stories where the heroes and the villains are clearly defined. I always feel like the writer tries to stuff his idea of "morality" down my throat.
Hence, I always prefer stories where instead of heroes and villains, you simply have people, each with a strong personal conviction in his duty/purpose/righteousness, and so the moral conflict between them is more like a battle arena between two subjective "rights" as opposed to between an objective "right" and "wrong".
Stories where the "right" and the "wrong" are clearly defined usually tend to give the "wrongdoer" some weaknesses (like impulsiveness, paranoia, etc) that ultimately lead to his demise. But that's not how the real world works, and just appears like some cheap trick on behalf of the writer to let the "right-doer" win. And whenever I see the audience cheer the stereotypical "hero" I become disgusted thinking "you guys are so easy to manipulate".

Additionally, I do often enjoy stories where a character, who firstly appears as a stereotypical "hero", after some personal growth through the story, transforms into a "villain" and ends up successfully dominating the scene and defeating the remaining "heroes".

Or, alternatively, I also enjoy it when a story portrays several characters as the stereotypical "heroes", but then as the story unfolds, we find out that they actually abide by very controversial and atypical moral principles, and thus we are forced to reassess whether we still empathize with them or not.

Is all of the above common for INTJ's, or can other types also relate?
 

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(At first I thought you were to complain about how INTJs are often the villain before I opened this up.)

I'm the guy with superheroes as my avatars so you can safely assume things about how much enjoyment I can get out of stories with black and white, good vs evil.

I love stories with a compelling villain, one who I can even see myself becoming. I honestly need more stories with more ambiguous lines, I find those the most fascinating stories.

There are actually plenty of stories which we can flip on its head with a different perspective to turn a hero into a villain if we just ignore all the obvious biasness to the narrative which paints the hero in a positive light. I can get a little frustrated with those.
 

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I must confess, I am a villains person. Well-written villains make me very happy. As far as the black and white good vs. evil, I have no problem with that as long as 1. it is reasonable that the villain ended up on the path they have chosen, 2. they are reasonable and use their brains, or 3. the villain is just plain psychotic and is just ruining everyone's lives for giggles.

I have a bit of a love-hate relationship with anti-heroes. They tend to be funny, capable, and usually more practical than your typical heroes (for example, if you've been bitten by a zombie, they will not hesitate for a second to cut off the infected area to save your life, which IMO is highly logical).

Example of an anti-hero I like/dislike: Yondu from The Guardians of the Galaxy. He's horrible and dysfunctional, but he's also funny and practical. The biggest complaint I have with his character is pretty common of anti-heroes: a disregard for the value of life. If you've seen GotG2, you remember the ship slaughter scene. Something about that scene did not sit right with me at all (and the people I saw it with). Maybe it was how much attention and focus was paid to the scene, but it didn't feel right. If Yondu were primarily a villain that would have been one thing, but he isn't portrayed as a villain in the movie (which is semi-aimed at kids, I will add). What he did is sort of pushed as "cool," and he's one of the "good guys" (sort of).

As far as heroes go, I do want a character I can morally agree with. As a result, my favorite heroes tend to be gritty old men who practice tough love without being cruel or spiteful. Naive heroes, stereotypical heroes, or heroes who are only heroes because of the writer's point of view can be truly nauseating. One reason I may favor villains could be simply because it's so hard to write a good hero.

In fact, there's only one show I can think of where I'm deeply divided over whether I like the hero or the villain more. It's rare that you come across a story where both are equally compelling.

With a true villain, there is no confusion about whether what the villain is doing is right or wrong or pushing of questionable morals. The villain's thinking is convoluted (or in some cases, psychotic) and goes beyond mere point of view, but it's also not so convoluted it's unbelievable - just enough that the ends do not justify the means, even if the villain thinks they do. A real-life example of this type of villainy would be Nazism. If you genuinely believe (however convolutedly) that you are of a superior race and that inferior races are threatening the future of humanity, then the obvious horrible conclusion you would reach is that you need to get rid of the other races somehow. Few people take the time to make their villains real characters though, and it's sad. Well-written villains make the story so much more rich.
 

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Yeah a more compelling story line likely is between: Chaotic Good vs Chaotic Evil

As opposed to the cliche hero and villain trope of alignments which is often:
Chaotic Good vs Lawful Evil (Robin Hood vs Sherrif of Nottingham)
Or
Lawful Good vs Chaotic Evil (almost any super hero trope against the villain)

More realistic (thinking of those really dry slow moving monotone color and voice depictions with a square who just is there surrounded by chaos). So there are obscure depictions. (Personally I am not usually a fan of this specific opaque portrayal and characterization but it's got some accurate touch to it). This characterization I think is often most common which is lawful neutral. Think of a hum dry male character who just goes thru a story line and all hell breaks loose every where. Most of what they face are flamboyant support characters of Chaotic Good and Chaotic Evil. It's not usually cliche in characters the problem is in order for people to have any interest to watch such a boring lead the storylines are what are always so far fetched and cliche even tho usually the character depictions are truer to real to life the story line is often so obscene. Usually you get running with scissors or the hangover out of this scenario.
 

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donald trump is us president, that's your reality.

reality is overrated.

a religion like islam is alive and growing bigger, that's your reality. people crash planes in skyscrapers killing themselves in the process.

people getting more and more polarized, that's your reality. and there are no aliens or omega level mutants around and it still happens.

if this polarization was between good and evil that would be very reasonable. but it's for much, much less. people do not even care what's good for them. like, most right wingers are workers, minimum wage people but for some reason they are the ones who hate socialism. makes no sense whatsoever. somehow their memories altered by a mutant maybe. this mutant go back in time and associated free health care, climate change, free education like ideas with faggotry or something so when they hear free health care they go nooooooooooooooo! i want a waaaaaaaaalllll !!!! build a wall around me and keep my asshole safe.
 

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donald trump is us president, that's your reality.

reality is overrated.

a religion like islam is alive and growing bigger, that's your reality. people crash planes in skyscrapers killing themselves in the process.

people getting more and more polarized, that's your reality. and there are no aliens or omega level mutants around and it still happens.

if this polarization was between good and evil that would be very reasonable. but it's for much, much less. people do not even care what's good for them. like, most right wingers are workers, minimum wage people but for some reason they are the ones who hate socialism. makes no sense whatsoever. somehow their memories altered by a mutant maybe. this mutant go back in time and associated free health care, climate change, free education like ideas with faggotry or something so when they hear free health care they go nooooooooooooooo! i want a waaaaaaaaalllll !!!! build a wall around me and keep my asshole safe.
What the hell are you on ?
 

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I've always found myself disliking stories where the heroes and the villains are clearly defined. I always feel like the writer tries to stuff his idea of "morality" down my throat.
Hence, I always prefer stories where instead of heroes and villains, you simply have people, each with a strong personal conviction in his duty/purpose/righteousness, and so the moral conflict between them is more like a battle arena between two subjective "rights" as opposed to between an objective "right" and "wrong".
Stories where the "right" and the "wrong" are clearly defined usually tend to give the "wrongdoer" some weaknesses (like impulsiveness, paranoia, etc) that ultimately lead to his demise. But that's not how the real world works, and just appears like some cheap trick on behalf of the writer to let the "right-doer" win. And whenever I see the audience cheer the stereotypical "hero" I become disgusted thinking "you guys are so easy to manipulate".

Additionally, I do often enjoy stories where a character, who firstly appears as a stereotypical "hero", after some personal growth through the story, transforms into a "villain" and ends up successfully dominating the scene and defeating the remaining "heroes".

Or, alternatively, I also enjoy it when a story portrays several characters as the stereotypical "heroes", but then as the story unfolds, we find out that they actually abide by very controversial and atypical moral principles, and thus we are forced to reassess whether we still empathize with them or not.

Is all of the above common for INTJ's, or can other types also relate?
I can be a sucker for hero-archetypes(Dragon Ball, DC Comics?...) but I will be more invested when two characters are more ambiguous in those traits. Honestly it just comes down to writing. You can have a story with two very archetypal characters who is well written in its simplicity, like you can also have pretentious trash when the writer messed up with inconsistent characters.
 

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I like clear heroes and villains, but that doesn't mean I don't like depth and complexity to the characters. However I can also enjoy stories where there's less of a 'good vs. bad' element.
 
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