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I think it would be rather interesting for older, more experienced ENTPs to advise younger ENTPs on matters of academia. It's obvious that the quality of curriculum and style of teaching differs greatly from country to country, but even so we'll probably reach a consensus by generalizing a little bit.

For starters, four simple questions:

Where did you study?
What did you study?
What was the experience like and how did it effect you?
Was it ultimately worth it?

I'm sure we're all aware of the purely pragmatic benefits of having a degree, but I genuinely feel like those benefits wouldn't justify 5 years of boredom and dissatisfaction. My view of academia is rather negative and I associate nothing but boredom and platitudes with my education. I actually have some university experience, but I simply stopped going because I didn't feel like it anymore. I studied electrical engineering and classes were essentially mandatory (Had to be on 70% of all classes during the whole year). So my days back then consisted of spending 6 hours listening to some guy yammer on about really uninteresting stuff in the driest way possible.

I usually tuned out and started writing random things down in my notebook. After a month of classes university was just a place where I slept, listened to music and wrote my D&D scenarios. However, I truly want to be proficient at many things and develop many impressive skill sets in my life. I really don't think I'm lazy, and I think the word "undisciplined" just means "You're not doing things the way I am doing them so WAAAAAAAAAAAH". I'm currently thinking about going back to uni with a more positive attitude and trying to enjoy it, but it seems almost impossible. The whole thing places heavy emphasis on memorization and reproduction, and I feel like there's not a lot of room for thinking creatively or in some cases, thinking at all.
 

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Just a few thoughts

- I think a downside of overconfidence and an ability to hack anything is that you ultimately end up with a proficency for hacking and not much else
- The most valuable skill an ENTP can learn is a little grit and perseverance....even if its boring
- I would never want to hire an electrical engineer who thought creatively...unless he had first mastered the traditional way of doing things.

University is relative...want to be a doctor? get a degree...want to be an entrepreneur? there are better ways...Parts of university will always be boring but the secret to success for any ENTP is knowing when to trudge through some boring stuff to get to a bigger prize at the end. Just make sure you know what prize you are chasing.
 

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Older, mature (for an ENTP) ENTP female here. First, to answer your questions:

Where did you study? In the US at a public university located in a large city

What did you study? I got a Bachelors of Science in Geology and a minor in Anthropology

What was the experience like and how did it effect you? My experience was good. I lived in a dorm (single room within a cluster of rooms sharing one bathroom) first and then lived with a roommate in a nearby apartment my last year. I graduated in 4 years mainly because I wanted to get done with it and move on so I had very busy class loads (opposed to having lighter loads and taking longer-even now in my career, I am much better focused if I am almost to the point of being over-busy. I get lazy if I am not very busy). When I was choosing a college, I had no interest in going to university in the middle of no where (in the US we call them "college towns") so I purposely picked a place in a large city. I would definitely not change that. I have no interest in the sitting around in crappy places with nothing to do but drink but I loved that cool restaurants, bars, comedy clubs, museums, beaches, zoos, concerts were a subway ride away. It made me very independent because I learned that if people weren't around to go do stuff, I can do it alone. I did join a service group to meet people since universities in big cities tend not to have as much a social life within school because there are so many places to go to. I met my best friend through the group and ultimately met my husband through her after I graduated (they were in the same architecture program).

Was it ultimately worth it? Definitely.

So my 2 cents (American for "here's my advise whether you want it or not"), I definitely think that going to college/university is worth it for a multitude of reasons, most of which has nothing to do with the actual education you get. College is good transition experience between teen to adulthood. It is a way of getting out of your parent's house and away from the stability of friends who might be suppressing the real you. Believe it or not, even if you have great friends growing up, it is amazing once you are away from them how much you realize that they might hinder your growth. College is a stepping stone of independence when you are not quite fully on your own and responsible, but you get a taste of it. I cannot tell you how much I really got to know myself by the end of college. I think a Fe-user needs this more than an a Fi-user. We tend to absorb the people around us and often are not self-reflective enough to see how it affects us. I found too that the people I met in college were more diverse than my home friends but much more like minded with me.

Another reason I think university is a good idea is for your future. I have a couple friends and my own brother who did not get or finish their degree. They have been passed up for employment, got less pay, or could not advance at their companies just because they had no degree. In the case of my brother (who got very close to getting his degree but never finished) he worked his way up in sales (which as an ESFP he is fantastic at) and was one of the top seller but had a lower pay grade than his college graduate peers and got passed up for several promotions because they required the position to have a degree. I am in a position now where I am part of the hiring process and those without degrees don't even get much of a second look even if they had great experience.

For an 18/19 year old, 4 or 5 years of studying and testing at a university seems endless but it really is a blip on the radar for the rest of your life. What you study in school rarely has direct use in your career but it does teach you to look at things in a different way. I found even in my classes that were more about memorization, I got some building blocks that I have used the rest of my life. Except when taking my professional licensing test, I have not directly used what I learned in school much, but I learned to think critically, write scientifically, and evaluate data which I do use in my career. I will say, you need to pick a field of study you actually like though. Don't go into engineering if you feel like all they do is yammer on and is boring but it is something that you have the ability to do so you do it. You will find too that the higher classes in your degree become more interesting than the general level classes. Typically the classes are smaller so class participation is encouraged (usually an ENTPs strongest ability in school), the students around you are at your level, and topics are usually more interesting. The main thing is to realize that this 4-5 years of studying opens up much more opportunity and flexibility in the future (in general the higher up you are in a career, the more flexibility you have because you are in charge, not under someone else). The key is to figure out what you need to do to focus. Quite honestly, I figured out how I need to "organize" (I use that word lightly because I am not an organized person) to make sure I'm getting stuff done and advancing. I realized in school that I need move when I am memorizing things so I pace or walk while memorizing off of notecards. I realized that between 5-9pm I am completely useless at concentrating and best times to study are the afternoon and late night. I generally studied (if I didn't have a class) between 12pm-5pm and then 10pm-1am. I set small goals too (like read 10 pages, then I could stop, etc.). I also knew that I needed days off where I could just do what I wanted without feeling pressured to a schedule so I made sure I studied Sunday night through Thursday night and had Friday and Saturday off (unless I had some huge project due). You need to figure out what works for you.

Hope this helps.
 

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i think it's a no brainer that university is worthwhile. You need a degree in order to get a job where you can earn any comfortable amount of money as well as to get any job that is going to challenge your intellect and not be tedious.

The question isn't whether university is worthwhile, the question is what is your vocation in life? What career or goals do you feel you will find personally fulfilling?
@Chemical Teddy sounds like your dissatisfaction is with a career in electrical engineering and not so much uni as you're making it out to be. Figure out what you are passionate about. If you're truly passionate about something then you'll work hard at it and be success and earn a good living. I know it's not an easy thing to figure out. But try to get a better ballpark idea of what topics and aspects you desire/need (such as do you prefer working w/ people/alone, chances to be creative , directly experiencing helping others etc.)
 

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Where did you study?
Sydney, AU.

What did you study?
Started out in Law, transferred to Global Business, transferred again to Business. Will finish at the end of this year. The university wants me to go on to study Physics, but I probably won't anytime soon.

What was the experience like and how did it effect you?
I could think of things I'd rather do than go to a 9am Accounting class, but it's not the worst. Some people struggle more with uni than others. I'm not a procrastinator, and have no issue with exams, so uni is more breezy for me than it is for someone who routinely stays up until 5am to get an assignment done, or who has anxiety over exams. Once I decided to just stick to a degree and stop swapping and changing, I was fine. Settled well, got good grades etc. But I don't involve myself at all in uni life - I go to class, and come home. I don't live in campus and never would.

Was it ultimately worth it?
I assume it will be. Most jobs require a degree in Australia.
 

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Bachelors degree in Montreal, Canada.

It teaches you how to learn, prioritize, organize, discipline, perseverance and how to separate the important few from the trivia many. I liked university life, hung out with smart, ambitious, connected people and was inspired by some professors.

If you are driven to do something, or feel gifted in some way, I'd say get on and do it without the degree, like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs.
 

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PS. I went to school for chemical engineering .. and have mixed feelings about it. I'm grateful for the eductation and without that education I would not be on the path I am now, pursuing what I find to be a fulfilling vocation (i'm currently working on writing a book and plan to start a non-profit when book is complete)... however, I was never actually interested in going to school and or having a career in chemical engineering ... I just did it because of pressure from my parents to get a degree in something practical.
 

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PS. I went to school for chemical engineering .. and have mixed feelings about it. I'm grateful for the eductation and without that education I would not be on the path I am now, pursuing what I find to be a fulfilling vocation (i'm currently working on writing a book and plan to start a non-profit when book is complete)... however, I was never actually interested in going to school and or having a career in chemical engineering ... I just did it because of pressure from my parents to get a degree in something practical.
Well, in my experience in being in Calculus classes and friends with several Chem-E majors in college is that they are the least stick up their butt than the other engineering at least. Here in Chicago, a boat load of them ended up with the Wrigley Company designing gum.

Anyway, similar to what you said, even though your actual degree was not used, it was a stepping stone to something else. I think a lot of doors open with a degree either because you need one to apply for a certain job or through your connections in the university, whether peers or professors, you are able to get jobs or opportunities that you would not have gotten had you stayed in the town you grew up with the same people you have known all your life. Even if you move out and to a larger city, you will not meet the volume of people you would meet at college. When I graduated, I had about 25 students from my upper degree classes that knew me, 10-15 grad students, and 10 professors (plus the people I met through my service group) all who provided me a network to get my foot in doors. In fact my first job was through the head of the department whose former grad student was asking for recommendations. I went to school for hard geology (not environmental but the geology that requires extensive amounts math/calc, physics, and chemistry) and had intended on working for museums or researching but that first job put me moving toward environmental which I am very glad I ended up.

People can do what they want but I really do feel like if you have the money and the ability, why not go? Like my brother, you might be able to carve out a good career on your abilities and charm, but it was a much harder climb up with many opportunities passing him by just because he dropped out of college. A college graduate will have significantly more doors open to them.
 

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Well, in my experience in being in Calculus classes and friends with several Chem-E majors in college is that they are the least stick up their butt than the other engineering at least. Here in Chicago, a boat load of them ended up with the Wrigley Company designing gum.
lol the only reason why I chose chem-e was because it was the engineering discipline with the most girls!

my dad was an engineer and so encouraged me to go for engineering... and from a practicality perspective it seemed the most practical...a lot of things you need to go to grad school for in order to earn good money, whereas engineering provides the highest salaries and most job opportunities .. so since I didn't know what else i'd go for and wasn't confident enough to pursue something else I reluctantly went for engineering. And when I visited schools I soon realized all the engineering disciplines were like 90% guys excepts chem-e which was 50-50 .. so that's why I went for Chem-E. Which has always been weird that I went for it, because i can't say I've ever been interested in chemistry. I focused on Bio-Chem and I found cell-bio interesting. And actually the chem-e classes I enjoyed .. balancing equations, thermodynamics, physical chemistry... since I liked physics and was decent at math... but I couldn't tell you what's on the periodic table and don't care to know.

I was openly consciously aware that I was going to school for something I wasn't the least bit interested in at the time and very stressed about it. But my parents were insistent that I didn't take time off from school and had to go for something practical, so I was stuck going for it. I also dated a girl all through college in my major who then sat next to me for all my chem-e classes...the college classes were fine (tho stressful).. the prob was that I knew I didn't want to spend my life in that career.


But engineering ( in any discipline) is great because a major aspect of engineering is simply learning to solve problems and that is applicable to any and every area of life. Solving problems is a skill and not one that most people are naturally good at. The key to solving a problem is to really isolate what it is that you are trying to solve. It's such an easy concept ... but it's eludes people so much .. esp since in real life when you encounter a problem often people don't realize they're facing a problem they could be solving. I mean take hunger and poverty for instance. People through money at it and say we to make GMO so we can increase the food supply.. but is hunger really caused by food shortages?? No it's obviously not if you look into it. The key to reducing and ending hunger and poverty is by understanding what causes hunger and poverty. So many problems in the world .. hunger poverty, war, conflict are problems that can have solutions but so many people don't have the slightest idea about how to go about solving problems.

Also the other thing that's great about an engineering degree is the intensity of it. It's a ton of reading and studying.. after college ended I continued reading and studying things on my own. I feel my college education gave me an understanding about what it takes to really learn a subject as well as an awareness of a love of learning and drive to keep learning that I didn't realize I had before college.
 
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