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So, I just had two interviews for my internship placements. One at a bank for September and another that starts next week at GE Water. I feel they went well actually and hope to hear from them again in the coming days.

Anyway, I've had a bunch of interviews over the months and because their questions are so specific, they don't really give you a lot of room to showcase your whole persona. I've done well, but usually back out because I didn't really feel too good about the jobs. It's getting late though so I thought I should just take what comes but these are really good placements anyway.

Back to the point though, I decided to try something new and sell the INTJ profile instead of the normal schtick I used to do. Using and describing keywords like intuition (introverted in my case) and extraverted thinking I believe actually highlighted my strengths a lot more than just saying "big picture" or "organized"... which the interviewer said after finishing my setance. He seemed pretty INTP to me and the bank guy seemed pretty ISTJ. Anyway, I felt it gave real specific things to say and these in my opinion were probably my two strongest interviews this season.

Just wondering if anyone else has tried that in the past and how it worked for them.
 

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This sounds like a lousy idea. The point of a job interview is not to showcase yourself, but to prostitute yourself. Identify what the other party wants, and give it to them.

If they want someone who is detail-oriented, then conjure examples where you managed a lot of specifics. If they want someone who is flexible, give them examples of how you can multitask. MBTI can't help you here-- telling someone who wants flexibility that you have a one-track J mind, or to someone who needs precision that you're horrible with data but great with the big picture, is taking a self-destructive approach to procuring employment.

If you have options, then of course, it might, if all other factors are equal, be preferable to select the job that best fits your personality. But if you don't, then it isn't smart to sink yourself for the cause of pop psychology, especially since the MBTI stuff borders on astrology at times. Not worth it!
 

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This sounds like a lousy idea. The point of a job interview is not to showcase yourself, but to prostitute yourself. Identify what the other party wants, and give it to them.
Typical response. If say you already know they're looking for people who are going to be solving really technical problems and creating complicated documentation? You want someone who is going to collect detail quickly and see the big picture right away for a job designing test environment simulators.

Prostitute yourself. ha. NEVER. That's for lazy-assed good for nothing yuppies with no skills and only got where they are by sucking dick. That gets you nowhere when the guy that's hiring you actually knows his shit. That's the only person I'll work under.

You're interviewing the company just as much as they're interviewing you. It's a two way street.

If they want someone who is detail-oriented, then conjure examples where you managed a lot of specifics. If they want someone who is flexible, give them examples of how you can multitask. MBTI can't help you here-- telling someone who wants flexibility that you have a one-track J mind, or to someone who needs precision that you're horrible with data but great with the big picture, is taking a self-destructive approach to procuring employment.
And where in the OP does it say to RELY on MBTI? You always have stories ready because EVERYONE always asks "Give me an example of when you..."

Also, you're just using keywords not going over the entire Jung Theory. The descriptions are very good though and if you're in a situation where they are beneficial, why not?

If you have options, then of course, it might, if all other factors are equal, be preferable to select the job that best fits your personality. But if you don't, then it isn't smart to sink yourself for the cause of pop psychology, especially since the MBTI stuff borders on astrology at times. Not worth it!
What other job would you apply for unless it fits your personality?
 

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Depending on a few factors, I could see this either being great or being the worst idea ever for trying to put into a job interview. A couple points:

1. How well does the interviewer know MBTI? If they know some of it, then it may be a good thing to bring up if you know how well you slant this way or that on the scales. On the flip side, I'm not sure that trying to explain it to someone in a job interview will go far if you spend over half the interview trying to explain the 4 dimensions of typing.

2. How well does your type fit with the job? This is a bit trickier since unless you get into Step II typing, there are limits for how far one can go with each type.

This isn't all of them but I do think there is the question of how many others are you competing against for a position and how comfortable are you with your current situation? In my case, I have a job and while I could see some job interviews possibly bringing it up, I don't see that likely as I work in IT and psychology isn't a common interest in my experience.
 

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I don't know. I've hired a few dozen people in my day. If anyone did that I would smile a bit and think I had found an unusual specimen. Might work to differentiate yourself if the rest of the resume' and interview looks good. I would call it risky. I'm not like most hiring managers.
 

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I haven't done it. I would think anything that gives you a chance to show yourself as a person rather than a set of data about education and accomplishments would be good. Especially at the level you appear to be at, they want to know how well you will fit with their crew and probably figure they can train any specific knowledge or skill that is missing. The resume gets you the interview, but there's a whole lot of non-objective interpersonal dynamics that get you the job. If they don't like your personality, you're better off somewhere else where they appreciate you.
 

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I actually agree that this sounds like a bad idea. If you were in an interview saying you are detail oriented to begin with, you are probably not at all good at interviews. Your resume shouldn't even have cliche buzzwords like that anymore. It sounds to me like you are just using personality type jargon for buzzwords, but in a good interview you wouldn't bring up non-jargon buzzwords to begin with, much less ones that have a heck of a lot more meaning to people in this forum than they probably do to an interviewer.

When you said he finished your sentences, does that mean you were still using overdone buzzwords in your responses, or does that mean he had to clarify that what you actually meant was this traditional buzzword? Either way, I just can't see how I would work description words like this into an interview and walk away thinking it was quality. Perhaps you are evaluating this from the perspective of how you, someone versed in Jung, would want an interviewee to answer and that's why you think it's such a great idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Results in.

The GE guys thought I wouldn't be challenged enough at the job. That may be more due to my resume and trying to apply my skills to the position instead of saying I just needed my work hours for my internship. I also have a nasty habit of asking too many technical questions that the managers didn't have answers to (or couldn't give them).

Up side, third interview: just used the words, no reference as to how I actually function. Just answered name your strangths with more or less... "Intuition; seeing the big picture and how things connect to each other. Organized and logical thinking. Self starter." I was also less inquisitive and more about how I could fit into the company culture. Did not whore myself though. I was offered a position last week.

The bank still looks good.
 
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