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Some thoughts getting closer to Valentines day.

If Fi is dominant in INFP, doesn't the Fi want the infatuation, codependent, obsessive, oxytocin supercharged love over-the-top romantic experience? I thought that more emotional people would like more emotional content in their lives. Romantic ideals such as Romeo and Juliet seem to be what Fi is all about. I thought INFP like to have good feelings, so then why not aim for the best feeling? Maybe high emotionally sensitivity leads to a fear of infatuation.
No. While I don't want to be in a 'romantic' relationship for pragmatic reasons (money, status, support etc.), I also care about having a healthy relationship that lasts.

Codependence doesn't sound healthy, and I do not want to be dependent on someone or for them to be dependent on me. A relationship should add to life, not limit it.

I do want limits in a relationship, and I understand it's not always emotional highs, but ultimately, a relationship should be good for both people involved, and also have a positive impact on the things they value and love, as it should be supporting that individuality.

Romeo and Juliette (I believe) chose romance over pragmatism. They loved each other, but were unable to be together due to their families having conflict with each other. They were also just teens, and they died due to misunderstanding. While Romeo and Juliette are definitely an example of romantic love, I think there are many other healthier models since romantic love has become more commonplace and acceptable. But yes, I am a romantic. I am not going to be in a relationship just because it suits other designs, but has no origin in romance or true feelings for the other person.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Thanks everyone for the insights. If I try to summarize a composite of all the stories, it seems like Fi primarily wants to be comfortable so it can keep feeling good.

It may seek Romance depending on the degree of hormones involved, but is cautious to avoid pain. So while it recognizes its own desire for some sort of extreme romantic ideal, in practice it can be risk averse.

Also, Fi seems to be holistic in its desires, desiring acceptance, growth, purpose, and meaning. Also it seems like Fi is very particular when put with Si as it has a wealth of catalogued experiences. So everyone's Valentine's day will feel very different, with prior experience factoring into the equation.

Does this sound right? I'm really not sure because this description sounds very rational and unemotional an NT kind of way.

Maybe pragmatism feels good to Fi. It wants to feel secure. Is pragmatism a value that Fi likes to adopt? If so, where do these strong values and beliefs come from?

Or perhaps the crazy love thing is an Se thing, like a chemical sensory experience similar to recreational drugs.
 

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Also, Fi seems to be holistic in its desires, desiring acceptance, growth, purpose, and meaning. Also it seems like Fi is very particular when put with Si as it has a wealth of catalogued experiences. So everyone's Valentine's day will feel very different, with prior experience factoring into the equation.

Maybe pragmatism feels good to Fi. It wants to feel secure. Is pragmatism a value that Fi likes to adopt? If so, where do these strong values and beliefs come from?
I think all people are born with an independent set of values, but more particularly, Fi wants to re-evaluate its values along with each situation to ensure an authentic commitment to a decision. Fi usually recognizes instinctual values and moral boundaries upon triggering situations of indignation. However, there may or may not be an issue with introspective processing after the situation has occurred. I think this is why Fi enters into deep processing modes. But here I've encountered a problem upon thinking about my childhood experiences. At least with me, I didn't have a structured understanding of how to process experiences. I would just sit there and tear myself apart with shame, guilt, humiliation, etc. And then project into the potential future with crippling anxiety when there was ever a hint of a past painful event repeating itself.

It's only now with a structured, optimized processing along with mindfulness meditations and whatnot, that I'm much faster with this process. But that's not the point, because at least right now, I still haven't done a deep dive into my subconscious to face the deeply suppressed pains I've experienced in my childhood that affect my current world view and belief systems. Like, the belief systems I don't even know are there, regardless of whatever Fi has to do with it.

Pragmatism feels good to anyone. I would wager at least in some portion.

Fi wants to feel secure? I'm just getting enneagram 6 vibes from that. Maybe. Secure in authenticity (??). I almost want to say it's not a "want" to feel secure. It's just that nothing can happen before authenticity is at least in some part established. Otherwise the cognitive dissonance is just... yeesh.
 

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I agree with this but would like to add to it. The huge majority of people I meet, I have little connection to. I might like them, enjoy their company, even care about them. But there is no spark. No true bonding. At work they periodically move around who we sit with and many are upset, some cry, but I’m like “meh”.

But infrequently (every 7-10 years, maybe) I meet someone who I have some deep connection with. There’s instant captivation. I’m fascinated. They make me feel alive. They make me understand things about myself I never knew, or reconnect with things I thought I left behind when I was 20. It is almost always a man, very rarely a woman. There’s a sense that it could be romantic but it doesn’t have to be, or maybe I wish it was but I know it could never work. Or maybe it might have worked but I’m in a committed relationship where I’m happy so there is not a snowball’s chance of anything happening; I refuse to hurt someone I’m with or risk true attachment by chasing rainbows.

I live for this. I find it magnetic and frightening and beautiful. It’s what gives life meaning. Most of these relationships run their course after a few years. The person either drifts away or circumstances change. In the case of my husband it turned into a more normal love; one can’t maintain that level of intensity.

I’ve read that INFP is deeply committed to loved ones but also can have trouble staying with one person because of the Ne/Fi combination. We always see possibilities. Maybe this is my version of that. Because it is with learning to connect deeply with new people that we discover ever-deeper parts of ourselves.
I was about to reply when I read this. So true.

For example, i am always fascinated in meeting new people. Maybe it's my curiousity, or maybe it's Ne, or maybe it's Fi. I don't know. But i like to meet new people because i learn so much from their individuality. I think i am always fascinated in learning something new.

I don't have the energy to "sustain" relationships though, at least with everyone that I meet. I care but i cannot always be with them when they need me to? Maybe it's introversion? I have very limited energy and i need my alone time to recharge. I need my alone time to tear the situations apart and digest them. I need time to process the events that happened in me and around me. It's essential to my well being. However, i also love spending time with people i super really care about.

since my childhood days up to now, like what BlueFlower said, i can probably count in my fingers that people that mattered to me the most. As in MOST, in the superlative degree. They may or may not have reciprocated my feelings but i really don't care (ok i cared but i know i can't control all things and much more the feelings/emotions of other people). These people are probably the ones that I will be willing to sacrifice my life and die for them (literally and figuratively).

I think i am usually "infatuated". When i said infatuated, this is about admiration, probably about idolizing, or adoring. When i said usually, i think it's not "usually" as defined in the dictionary but maybe one or two people only every 1 to 4 years? When i was still in school, i only had 3 crushes (infatuated) in my entire elementary days, 3 in my entire high school days (one of them is female but i am not homosexual, again infatuation for me means adoration/admiration), and 5-6 during my college days.

When i started working, i had 3 infatuation in the first 2 years, 3 in the next 6 years and 2 in the next 5 years. As you can see, it's not a lot. However, i take things to the extremes sometimes. When i care about people and i consider them as someone i can connect with, i really care. I don't know if it's due to Ne but i see possibilities, and i want possibilities.

As for the question, probably subconsciously, i would want a love that is "romantic" in the sense that we both understand and accept each other, and do things for others that matter the most to us and/or never done to other people. Something that would make me feel special. However, i am fascinated with fairness, and i love equality in a relationship. I don't like being constrained or tied up to something, and i don't do it in return. I like Mr. and Mrs Smith for this reason - the equality they have in all aspects (mentally, physically, emotionally, etc). I think i kind of yearn something like that?

I am very fascinated with intelligent/intellectual people but i don't think I am intelligent myself (maybe that's why I am fascinated) so "romaticism" for me may be defined in another way (not the Romeo/Juliet kind of thing). Like for example, if we can calmly debate on some issues without getting personal or irritated, that's romantic for me. If the other person can put up with my shortcomings and lack of practicality, that's romantic for me. If my partner see me as his equal in terms of strength and intelligence, that's romantic for me. If he did things for me that i later benefited from, that's romantic for me. Well words of affirmation is on top of my language of love, so i guess telling me that he loves me and compliments me (verbal or written), is romantic for me. I think I have the need for affirmation.

I have fears, a lot of them. So what UberYoshi wrote in her reply is also applicable to me and my Fi, and what you assessed too (in a way). I sometimes do not act because i have fear of rejection. However, i am a risky person myself (woohoo, walking contradiction here). It really all depends on the specific situation.

I hope i did contribute something to this topic. I felt that my thoughts are kind of scattered all over the place :(
 

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Maybe they think they do. In practice, I don't think they want it at all.

Like I just remember idealizing the hell out of love before dating. I thought I wanted this intense, devoted, codependent gig until I had a partner who was the least bit clingy with me and now... I'm taking an extended break from dating... lol.

I just have a hard time managing the part of me that wants solitude and autonomy and the part of me that wants intense emotional experiences and deep human connections. People who expect more from me than I'm willing to give are absolutely exhausting, to the point that I've postponed the whole idea of dating until after I'm out of school and in a stable career. What I fantasize about in my head I realize I wouldn't actually want for myself, because I am a different person in reality than I am in my head.
 

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Thanks everyone for the insights. If I try to summarize a composite of all the stories, it seems like Fi primarily wants to be comfortable so it can keep feeling good.

It may seek Romance depending on the degree of hormones involved, but is cautious to avoid pain. So while it recognizes its own desire for some sort of extreme romantic ideal, in practice it can be risk averse.

Also, Fi seems to be holistic in its desires, desiring acceptance, growth, purpose, and meaning. Also it seems like Fi is very particular when put with Si as it has a wealth of catalogued experiences. So everyone's Valentine's day will feel very different, with prior experience factoring into the equation.

Does this sound right? I'm really not sure because this description sounds very rational and unemotional an NT kind of way.

Maybe pragmatism feels good to Fi. It wants to feel secure. Is pragmatism a value that Fi likes to adopt? If so, where do these strong values and beliefs come from?

Or perhaps the crazy love thing is an Se thing, like a chemical sensory experience similar to recreational drugs.
Yea I think that sounds about right. Because it feels joy intensely it also feels pain intensely so is protected intensely.

And yea I think with a weakness in Te when someone can handle it well it usually would feel good for the Fi/Te Axis. Much like someone describing well the weak Fi in the Te/Fi axis.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
What I fantasize about in my head I realize I wouldn't actually want for myself, because I am a different person in reality than I am in my head.
That's an interesting capability to be able to create a fantasy world and be a different person in that fantasy than in reality. To have different desires in a fantasy world than in the real world, seems like a single player roleplaying game. Perhaps Fi can tell it likes the idea of something rather than the actual thing, but some people still get married in an MMORPG game. Yet the feelings can be real either way.
 

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@UberY0shi 's post is great just in my own personal mind, so I don't have much to add.

Like it was said before, this whole topic has variables because Fi is this thing that changes from person to person, because it's a catalogue of values. And this catalogue is heavily influenced by Si's catalogue of past experiences, trial and error, and a person's evolution of perception and preferences (mindfulness and meditation are great practices for this), etc, so a person whose Fi values XYZ when they're 20, they might then toss those values/goals to the trash when they're 30 and adopt new ones.

And while I can see myself in the description of Fi = holistic, it inevitably makes me doubt my own conclusions about Fi, because I look at INFJs for example, a group of people I'm surrounded by everyday for hobbies reasons, and they're heavy on the same holistic aspect, they are heavy on their personal values, and meaning, and all those things. So how much of this whole thing is Fi, u know? I wonder.

Maybe pragmatism feels good to Fi. It wants to feel secure. Is pragmatism a value that Fi likes to adopt? If so, where do these strong values and beliefs come from?
It is a value to me, certainly. I don't know about other people's catalogues.
These values at least for me come from observation of life (learning from other people's mistakes and pain) and 1st person exposure. I happened to be raised by an ISFJ father who kept me sane, and a psychotic mother who provided chaos. Taking into consideration that INFPs are extremely sensitive children and teens, you stick to what keeps you sane, so I picked up on many aspects of my father because those aspects brought me peace, meaning, purpose, etc. So you construct this inner Bible of rules and preferences under which you will conduct your life in order to keep yourself calm, peaceful, harmonious, happy, expansive, etc etc. Had my basic personality been different (say an ENTP) I would've processed my parents' styles differently and maybe would've adopted the traits of my mother. So what you absorb comes down to how you perceive the world at a basic level, sensitivity levels, etc. It's like the mystery of twins who grow up to be opposite people. If a part of personality is genetic (and I don't know for sure if it is) then the type of sponge that you are will make you absorb this or that from the world.
Everyone is looking to feel satisfied and fulfilled, but how those needs get met comes down to individual preferences.
As you go through life, you test your own Bible and readjust depending on what feels right. So let's say I didn't care about money when I was 20, but I've dated enough XYZ characteristic in men to have readjusted my Bible to know that I need the opposite. It turns into a need, because you have tested it in the real world and you see what is actually good for you (pragmatism), a need, not just a want or a fantasy.

If I look at my ESFP's auxiliary Fi, it has absolutely nothing in common with my Fi. Our values are so completely different. Where they come from? I can't say, other than each person's individual concept of self-preservation, fulfillment, happiness, peace, purpose, etc.
 

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The idea sounds really romantic in an unhealthy way and also pretty selfish to me. It's pretty attractive perhaps the sound of it is but in reality, such a love is probably not going to end well. And I might as well go for something more promising and healthy as compared to obsessive, co-dependent love. I'd rather go for a love that's more selfless and focused on bettering the world rather than just loving each other selfishly if that makes sense lol. :)
 

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That's an interesting capability to be able to create a fantasy world and be a different person in that fantasy than in reality. To have different desires in a fantasy world than in the real world, seems like a single player roleplaying game. Perhaps Fi can tell it likes the idea of something rather than the actual thing, but some people still get married in an MMORPG game. Yet the feelings can be real either way.
I think it also has to do with Ne, Ne can dream up different possibilties that haven't happened yet, so we can look at a romantic interest and dream up all the possible ways the relationship can go. That is the fantasy we experience in our minds, all the idealistic possiblities that could happen with that person. Problem is we don't have any concrete facts in reality to support those possibilities actually happening. So we realize that even though we dream up who that person MIGHT be, we have fallen in love with a false idea and if we proceed to pursue that person based off a false idea the possibility of us being horribly disappointed is also considered.

Also this co-dependent obsessive, I can't live without you in my life love, sounds like that kind of love where if any of the two tried to leave the other person would kill them, or threaten to take their own life.

I'm sure a great deal of relationships where the partner killed the other or themselves, were obsessive and co-dependent.

@
As you go through life, you test your own Bible and readjust depending on what feels right. So let's say I didn't care about money when I was 20, but I've dated enough XYZ characteristic in men to have readjusted my Bible to know that I need the opposite. It turns into a need, because you have tested it in the real world and you see what is actually good for you (pragmatism), a need, not just a want or a fantasy.



Yeaaaaa, at first you want to be all free spirited and live in some bohemian utopia where nobody uses money and everyone is kind and shares their goods, and you play and laugh and love all day. And then you realize, I can't survive without money, and I also want nice things in my life, I can't do that without money, hm, maybe I should leave this Bohemian place and actually learn some practical skills lol.

And yes pragmatism you later realize becomes a need. I had an ISTJ dad that tried to bea tthat in my head for years, it wasn't until my mid 20's I realized I need to be more practical, because you can't just take care of you wants, you have to take care of your needs aswell.
 

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@Lord Pixel won't quote your whole post cause it's awesome as it is. Agree with everything, and not just that, there's this also:

As a child, you see everyone around you struggling, everyone is always fighting about money, they seem so unhappy and exhausted every day of their lives, so you come to realise that money is the culprit of unhappiness. If it didn't exist, everyone would feel the opposite of exhausted, unhappy, etc. You do the math in your brain and figure out the solution: solution must be bohemia, riiiight?

But then you go and live in Bohemia for a while, and you realize that the people there are backstabbing each other, there's gossip, there's the exact same melodrama that people who aren't in Bohemia are experiencing. They're not happier, because people are people. And on top of that melodrama, they can't pay for a shower or a doctor. So now you've tested what you thought was the solution, and you realize that humans are humans.
Wherever You go, there You are.
And you realize that money was never the problem, it was something else that people carry within themselves no matter where they are. And you also realize that as you're sitting in Bohemia broke for no real purpose or reason that solves anything in the world, you can't contribute to causes you like, you can't give to cancer research, you can't buy your father a car, you can't visit your mother for Christmas cause you don't have money for the plane ticket, and you realise that money helps you be more of who you are. If you are a kind person, you will use it to amplify kindness in the world.

You have to live life (try your Bible) and really analyse who you think your enemy is. Sometimes it's not who or what you think it is, it's something else entirely.

Some people who might've thought obsessive love was ideal, then turns out that their introversion can't handle the pressure cause they need to be alone more than they had imagined. Or turns out they like to be more independent and in-control than they imagined. U live and u learn and u readjust.
 

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@Lord Pixel won't quote your whole post cause it's awesome as it is. Agree with everything, and not just that, there's this also:

As a child, you see everyone around you struggling, everyone is always fighting about money, they seem so unhappy and exhausted every day of their lives, so you come to realise that money is the culprit of unhappiness. If it didn't exist, everyone would feel the opposite of exhausted, unhappy, etc. You do the math in your brain and figure out the solution: solution must be bohemia, riiiight?

But then you go and live in Bohemia for a while, and you realize that the people there are backstabbing each other, there's gossip, there's the exact same melodrama that people who aren't in Bohemia are experiencing. They're not happier, because people are people. And on top of that melodrama, they can't pay for a shower or a doctor. So now you've tested what you thought was the solution, and you realize that humans are humans.
Wherever You go, there You are.
And you realize that money was never the problem, it was something else that people carry within themselves no matter where they are. And you also realize that as you're sitting in Bohemia broke for no real purpose or reason that solves anything in the world, you can't contribute to causes you like, you can't give to cancer research, you can't buy your father a car, you can't visit your mother for Christmas cause you don't have money for the plane ticket, and you realise that money helps you be more of who you are. If you are a kind person, you will use it to amplify kindness in the world.

You have to live life (try your Bible) and really analyse who you think your enemy is. Sometimes it's not who or what you think it is, it's something else entirely.

Some people who might've thought obsessive love was ideal, then turns out that their introversion can't handle the pressure cause they need to be alone more than they had imagined. Or turns out they like to be more independent and in-control than they imagined. U live and u learn and u readjust.
Yup yup yup! I felt the same about people and money at a young age too.

I'm glad I read this because I've dreamed of going to "bohemia" but never been, so hearing that the people there might be the same saves my brain some space to explore something else.

Yeaaa, money helps you be more of who you are. And that bold part, ahhhh that hurt lol, I felt that one, I felt like I was sitting in bohemia just feeling bad for myself reading that whole part good job looool.

Can't accomplish our wild dreams without money and practical means, we simply learn we have to face that at some point.

Your post was good, I felt most of it and some of it I didn't even think of initially, thanks.
 

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Price's Law, Pareto Principle, all the understandings of Personality/Behavioral/Psychoanalytical Psychology, Sociology, Linguistics, History, eventually you kinda just learn, humans are all struggling with the same shit.

Any societal attempts to enforce socio-economic equity, turn into hellholes. Or just die. All must bow to Price's Law/Pareto Principle.

Curious though, just to make sure my facts are right. Bohemia is Czechoslovakia right? They're pretty damn good when it comes to personal freedom. And yet... @entheos confirms it still kinda sucks ya?

It's gotta be some European country, those guys are pretty good at personal freedom. Besides Canada. America is actually a bit overrated, though still quite free.
 

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Here’s the thing to remember about MBTI that is relevant to this topic. It describes how we process information, sure. And it describes how we interact with our world. Some of it is undoubtedly genetic; the I-E scale, for instance, is likely primarily neurological.

But some of it is nurture. You can read the personality descriptions and honestly, some just sound healthier than others. They are presented as all being equal. But you read INFP, you read INTJ, and it’s hard to walk away and say “Gee, that sounds like a great way to be!” Those types that are by definition super careful socially, struggle to be understood, to connect—that comes from someplace. Many of us likely had struggles in childhood. Some might have had difficult home lives. Others (and I think this is true of some INTJs) are so smart and logical that they struggled to connect with peers as kids.

So Clem says our approach sounds somehow logical and pragmatic. That may be but I think some of that is because many of us were so bad at it when we were young that we taught ourselves our social skills when we got older. This works, this doesn’t. We think about it a lot because when we tried just doing what came naturally when we were teens it didn’t work out so well.

I’m rambling. My point is that INFP is a very romantic type in our heads. But we are socially cautious and reserved and so while we need a strong emotional connection, we need the initial spark, we will also apply hefty amounts of logic when we decide if a relationship will continue or not. That logic is grounded in our Fi, sure. But INFP can be cool and calculating to protect our inner core. We are either the strongest fragile people out there, or the most fragile strong people. One or the other.
 

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I so agree with this. I have always believed that a personality is a nature + nurture combination (at least based from my own experience) but unfortunately i don't believe that personality changes once "imprinted." Behaviors change, but not the core personality :)

As a child, i so agree with what Blue Flower said. When i was myself, i was always reprimanded for this and that. I had very poor social skills when i was still a child. And while growing, i learn. adjust. make mistakes. adjust again. mistakes. adjust. and so on.

I do crave human contact, not social contact. I like to see people, their true nature, their core. They say I am sweet, probably i am. Because in my head, i am a hopeless romantic. But when it comes to relationships in the real world, i seem to have a problem with super clingy people. When i said super clingy, i meant that they get offended easily if i decline even just one invitation from them, and then they're going to "emotionally manipulate" me by making me feel guilty. I always say that I don't seem to jive well with super emotional people. Based on my experience, we tend to clash because when they get sensitive and emotional, i feel bad and then i will also get sensitive and emotional. It's like a loop. That's partly the reason why I am so amazed with INTJs (and adored them to some extent). Like what BlueFlower said in other threads, i also feel that we are the so alike yet so different. I need someone to balance me out. So yes while I am a hopeless romantic by heart (and head), I don't like the overacting kind of romanticism. I am however cheesy and mushy with my words, especially to the people i cared the most, and if they are TJs type, i think they .. cringe? They get off. So yes, i am a hopeless romantic through some of my actions (probably a product of my mind) and yet not really one.

And I kinda hated it when BlueFlower always unearthed INFPs secrets! Hahahaha. Like yes, i have the subconscious (or conscious) need to protect myself. That's why i want to always expect the worst. They say that I am hopeful and optimist (that's what I project i guess) but inside i am also cautious and wary, that's why i usually do the devil's advocate thing. I just want to challenge some things that I perceive to be good, just to protect myself in case something bad happens.

Here’s the thing to remember about MBTI that is relevant to this topic. It describes how we process information, sure. And it describes how we interact with our world. Some of it is undoubtedly genetic; the I-E scale, for instance, is likely primarily neurological.

But some of it is nurture. You can read the personality descriptions and honestly, some just sound healthier than others. They are presented as all being equal. But you read INFP, you read INTJ, and it’s hard to walk away and say “Gee, that sounds like a great way to be!” Those types that are by definition super careful socially, struggle to be understood, to connect—that comes from someplace. Many of us likely had struggles in childhood. Some might have had difficult home lives. Others (and I think this is true of some INTJs) are so smart and logical that they struggled to connect with peers as kids.

So Clem says our approach sounds somehow logical and pragmatic. That may be but I think some of that is because many of us were so bad at it when we were young that we taught ourselves our social skills when we got older. This works, this doesn’t. We think about it a lot because when we tried just doing what came naturally when we were teens it didn’t work out so well.

I’m rambling. My point is that INFP is a very romantic type in our heads. But we are socially cautious and reserved and so while we need a strong emotional connection, we need the initial spark, we will also apply hefty amounts of logic when we decide if a relationship will continue or not. That logic is grounded in our Fi, sure. But INFP can be cool and calculating to protect our inner core. We are either the strongest fragile people out there, or the most fragile strong people. One or the other.
 

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Curious though, just to make sure my facts are right. Bohemia is Czechoslovakia right? They're pretty damn good when it comes to personal freedom. And yet... @entheos confirms it still kinda sucks ya?

It's gotta be some European country, those guys are pretty good at personal freedom. Besides Canada. America is actually a bit overrated, though still quite free.
Well when I was talking about Bohemia, I was talking about the archetype, not a real place. This place could be a city, or a village, or just a building, anywhere, a place focused on the arts & barter & trade & frugality, close relationships with random people, tight community thinking that everybody is your friend, echo chamber, it's a kind of anarchy, less hardcore but still.

I didn't go and live in Chekoslovakia xD (mispelled on purpose cause it's too long xD). It's a concept.


by @Blue Flower :

So Clem says our approach sounds somehow logical and pragmatic. That may be but I think some of that is because many of us were so bad at it when we were young that we taught ourselves our social skills when we got older. This works, this doesn’t. We think about it a lot because when we tried just doing what came naturally when we were teens it didn’t work out so well.

I’m rambling. My point is that INFP is a very romantic type in our heads. But we are socially cautious and reserved and so while we need a strong emotional connection, we need the initial spark, we will also apply hefty amounts of logic when we decide if a relationship will continue or not. That logic is grounded in our Fi, sure. But INFP can be cool and calculating to protect our inner core.
A++++++
 
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