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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This evening while watching a few episodes of mythbusters I'm just really struck with how totally okay I am with never experiencing Thrilling things. (Ex: bungee jumping, flying at super-sonic speeds in a fighter jet) It's interesting to me to see people who thrive off this stuff, but just imagining and watching others do things is quite enough for me. I really have no desire to test the limits of my physical capabilities and endurance.

It seems like, according to theory, thrilling experiences would be Se dominant territory, but I was just wondering if my fellow INFPs agree with me on the sentiment of "I'll pass" or if some of you are adrenalin junkies? If you are, feel free to share some of your exciting experiences or aspirations, and if you aren't feel free to share some of the more mild experiences that make you feel alive.


As an example of one of my 'tame thrills', I love swinging high on tall swings, but when the whole swing-frame starts to pull up out of the ground and rock back and forth that's a bit too much for my taste, and I've never had the nerve to actually jump out of a swing.
 

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I gotta say that on the odd occasion and out of a novel experience, i'm up for doing something a bit physically dangerous. I will probably never do bungee jumping and if I did, it would be because it was something I have never done before and because I would perhaps want to put myself in a life and death situation to see if I can survive but it's less likely with bungee jumping tbh, i'm a 6 aswell a type known for putting themselves in the line of fire sometimes. I used to enjoy the amusements fair/funfair when I was younger, I enjoyed some of the rides that tossed you upside down etc. Another ride that I really want to avoid is a rollercoaster, I have an absolute fear of them, I don't trust that i'm just gonna fly off into the distance with one of those, lol! I think I do enjoy sensory type activities depending on what they are, they make me feel alive :ninja:
I second swinging high on playground swings :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Another thing I really enjoy is the moment of lift-off in normal airplanes, that's pretty exhilarating, relaxing back in the seat and then feeling the vibration of the ground drop away - but it's also a very secure sort of setting, and you don't get pushed back in your seat tooo hard.

Another ride that I really want to avoid is a rollercoaster, I have an absolute fear of them, I don't trust that i'm just gonna fly off into the distance with one of those, lol!
I've enjoyed some roller coasters, but not the really crazy ones. I've only been on one that had an upside-down loop, and it wasn't as bad as I'd expected, but the entire ride didn't really feel like other rollercoasters, it felt very stable and amazingly smooth so that it actually felt relaxing, it didn't feel like it was going that fast, probably because the wind was less in your face or something and it wasn't rattling around like it was about to jump off it's rails (it was the one at Disneyland's California Adventure), but that experience didn't make me keen to try any others. I remember being terrified just watching people go on 'montezuma's revenge' at Knott's Berry Farm because it just had a loose lap bar, not shoulder harnesses, even though it went upside down, and I just couldn't help thinking that if it jammed halfway round the loop everyone would fall out on their heads.

When I was in grade school I used to like going on this one Parachute ride where you stand in a metal basket and it's pulled up to the top of this tower and then drops, but I don't think it went as fast as most of those rides that drop you because it actually did have a parachute so you would mostly drift down rather than plummeting. But, back then, I was super light and my feet would lift off the floor of the basket anyways so I was just holding onto the bars with my hands and I liked that. I certainly don't have the stomach for quick drops anymore though.
 

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Another thing I really enjoy is the moment of lift-off in normal airplanes, that's pretty exhilarating, relaxing back in the seat and then feeling the vibration of the ground drop away - but it's also a very secure sort of setting, and you don't get pushed back in your seat tooo hard.
Airplanes give a nice rush when you're lifting off and because you know your pretty secure, in fact your more likely to get harmed in a car accident than an airplane says the statistics. Airplanes are fun! It would be cool to go in a helicopter, you could like see everything from down below, it would be cool to go above the amazon rainforest in one of those.

When I was in grade school I used to like going on this one Parachute ride where you stand in a metal basket and it's pulled up to the top of this tower and then drops, but I don't think it went as fast as most of those rides that drop you because it actually did have a parachute so you would mostly drift down rather than plummeting. But, back then, I was super light and my feet would lift off the floor of the basket anyways so I was just holding onto the bars with my hands and I liked that. I certainly don't have the stomach for quick drops anymore though.
That sounds similar to one of these, which are both scary and exhilarating, haha! Yup, same as you, don't think I could go through that again, lol! :crazy: Well maybe once more
 

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This is a topic I can sink my teeth into.....

I've had my fair share of "thrilling" experiences, some that have quite advertently put my life at risk. Some of them happened more by chance and the circumstances I was into at the time. Others by my own volition (and with a helluva lot more precautions).

What I can say is that I thrive off of new experiences and having new memories to recollect on when I find some intermittent solitude. There is a very slim chance of ever forgetting being lifted into the air hundreds of feet with little to no support on a small cable line and hoist. Or getting a birds eye view of the world looking out of an open door. Ancient structures you can marvel at and wonder how a man could engineer such a feet with just wood and stone. So on and so forth.

There is quite the adrenaline rush from living such a lifestyle and tends to creep it's way into everyday life. Day to day can seem a bit monotonous without the occasional fix, where you eventually find activities and hobbies to emulate that kind of stimulation. Exercise and motorcycle riding seems to do the trick however, even if only temporarily. Or seeking a lifestyle and work more suited to what you are accustomed too (i.e. braving the elements, becoming an instructor of sports, high risk security posts, etc.)

Fear is a strange emotion in that as you gain confidence in different extreme activities, more mundane and less risky ones can have a more pronounced effect on the psyche. I would have no problem jumping out of a perfectly good airplane, but making me speak in front of a crowd gets me queasy. Perhaps it's just conditioning and becoming aware that in all circumstances there is some inherent risk, but not enough to dissuade you from trying at the very least. Carpe diem.
 

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I'm a major thrill seeker, though unfortunately I feel there aren't many opportunities to thrill-seek when you don't have any money! Instead I tend to do things that don't cost anything, like when I'm with my best friend I have a tendency to get fully naked in public for the sake of it (AT NIGHT TIME) and run across a field or something. As a kid I used to shoplift for the thrill of it too, though I stopped when one of my friends got caught! I tend to be attracted to sexually thrilling experiences as well - usually thrilling because they're inappropriate in a place you shouldn't..

I also love 'full body' sensations - such as... say you have a very cold lake, I will want to submerge every nerve in my body in the cold - just to feel that VIVIDNESS and the painful sensuality across every part of your being. I love that its a feeling you can't reciprocate.. (getting in a cold bath with ice cubes? I dont think so...). I also have a thing for stormy seas and massive waves where you have little control over your body.

I love heights, tree climbing, rollercoasters, the roofs of very high buildings - the more danger that you could break your neck, the better.

When it comes to PEOPLE however, I'm not a thrill seeker. I'm not one for public speaking! Well, rarely anyway.
 

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A lot of people call me an adrenaline junkie. But that's not why I participate in extreme sports. Adrenaline rushes and massive sensory input are ancillary to the mental processes and the ways I appreciate nature in the sports I do. I am (hope this doesn't sound too arrogant) an elite athlete and it's important for me to use my body to test myself. But it's more than that, too. Even though I am a non-believer, I always liked Eric Liddel's quote in Chariots of Fire where he tells his sister, "I know God made me for a purpose, for China. But He also made me fast. And I feel His glory when I run. To deny that would be to hold Him in contempt." I feel something very spiritual (not religious) when I run, when I ski, when I climb. And I do these things to the maximum of my ability.

I don't just go skiing. I climb high mountains where nobody has ever skied before so I can ski back down in no-fall zones--meaning if I fall I will likely die. I don't just run. I run ultramarathons in the mountains. I do these things alone (no solo backcountry skiing since I married out of respect for my wife's feelings about that) or with partners. Yes, it is an amazing sensory experience and even though I am highly intuitive, I appreciate that and enjoy it as well. But it's really more about engaging in a challenging process that uses all of my body, mind, and spirit to get through alive. It's never easy to explain adequately to those that ask, but I feel like I am the most natural and complete me when I am moving my body through nature under my own power or playing with gravity.

A lot of it is about mastering skills and learning. I have zero interest in bunjee jumping because there are no skills or knowledge involved other than those of the other person who rigs the bunjee. I don't drive fast because it terrifies me and I think the risks are unjustifiable when I consider the potential consequences not only to me but to other people on the road. I do go out into the mountains to test whether an idea I have goes or not. If it does not go, it's because of the decisions I make regarding my own behavior. If it does go, I do get to have these peak experiences that nothing, and I really mean nothing else can match. If I go out and ski a line that has turned me away many times before in the past, I have accomplished my goal, which is always to learn how to make better decisions with the information available to me and to come home alive. If I turn back, it's really the same thing, because it's all about a process and the way I live rather than living purely for that moment--though the moment is surely a hugely compelling reason for why I do it.

When dealing with avalanches, I use a lifetime of scientific education, experience in the snow, and an intuitive sixth sense that I have developed that helps me to look into this unobservable and spatially variable medium and have a pretty good idea of whether or not it will slide if I step on it. But I still don't know for sure. Sometimes I do step on it in a well-controlled manner and sometimes it slides but sometimes it doesn't and some of those times I ski it while some of those times I refrain because I'm still leery. I don't get myself caught in it but always try to make it go from a (relatively) safe spot at the very top. When I start one, I have this indescribably calm about me as it is happening. I am just there and observing what is happening as if I am outside of my body. Getting hit by or caught up in one of those monsters will kill you dead and I am not trying to die. I love my life when I'm in the mountains. I'm trying to live at the highest level of my consciousness I know how to live. I do that by skiing big lines and running alone in mountain lion country. That's my church, if you will.

I probably haven't explained it well at all, but thank you @Aelthwyn for asking the question in such a thoughtful way.
 

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I'm more of an inward journey person, things can get vivid in there!

"Did they not say:

‘Seek and you will find?’
‘Err and you will be forgiven.’

Within, within. This is where the world’s treasure has always been"

Tao Te Ching, Verse 62
 

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I love experiences. I'll try almost anything once. Bungee jumping in my 20s - boring. Skydiving in my 20s, it was really amazing to feel the sensation of going from falling to floating as your eyes adjust to the horizon. I'll be doing it again in the next month or so - great Groupon deal I couldn't pass up.

I rock climb, not so much for the adrenaline as it is for how that sport challenges my muscles and learning the skill that it takes to do it right. Also, my entire family climbs - wife and both kiddos. And I like that group experience.

What makes me feel alive is taking a risk in order to get a reward. Dopamine makes our brain feel good. And it usually comes from the unknown, from not knowing that we're 100% going to get the outcome we desire. The physical risks I like are are usually correlated with the gaining skill as a reward. But life risks are biggest source of dopamine. Talking to that person you wanted to meet. Taking calculated financial risks. Starting this or that project that I put off knowing that I might spend a lot of time and fail.
 

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By the standard definition of thrill seeker, I'm sure I'm pretty low on the thrill seeker scale. In general, I'm a little hesitant and slow when it comes to doing something extreme in this context.. I'm cautious. I sometimes take a lot of convincing and coaxing to step out.

For example, when I was visiting a friend's friend's home in Mexico, a group of them all planned to take their ATV's and motorcycles out for a trip through the desert, the mountains, and through the city, but I was pretty adamant that I did not want to go... Seemed too risky.. None of them were wearing helmets which seemed like a death-wish to me and I didn't know the group of people all that well given that the friend I knew and traveled to Mexico with had flown home. I remember holding onto a stop sign (or something cemented into the street) like glue when they tried to lead me to the ATV. They had to wear me down for about two hours before I was convinced to go... with offers of a helmet and promises that if I got freaked out, the guy I rode with would slow down... Finally, with that, I surrendered my misgivings and gave in. (Maybe it was a control issue?)

And I'm glad I did because it was amazing!!!! I recall feeling so very alive in those moments. The scenery was incredibly beautiful and the terrain varied wildly one mile to the next.. and I can still remember the feeling of the wind flying through my hair as we descended down this curling mountainous road while the sun was setting.. with the city scaling the horizon in the distance.. I remember thinking, "I never do stuff like this!!!! Am I in a daydream? Is it real?!! Seems like a fantasy!! Only better!" By the end of the night, we approached home unrecognizably blanketed in mud-bliss with echoes of laughter.

I like shifting gears into "SP-mode" from time to time because I think it clicks my mind into a new gear and gives it a reboot, considering my mind has a tendency to smoke itself into an over-think-combustion. Shifting my state of being from "thinking" into "doing" is a continual challenge for me, but something I need. I wouldn't let myself go on the trip because I kept envisioning (thinking) all of the bad things that might happen if we went, and I was listening to that "Oh_no" angst-feeling in my gut, but once I just let go, I found freedom.

So, am I a thrill seeker? Not really. But after the fact, I come to welcome a thrilling experience. Also, I guess it helps to have people I trust around that are willing to work with me, should I change my mind... Makes me feel safer, and more in control.

Sorry if you heard that story before, I know I've shared it once before at PerC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
That sounds similar to one of these, which are both scary and exhilarating, haha! Yup, same as you, don't think I could go through that again, lol! :crazy: Well maybe once more
one of those replaced the ride I used to like, I've never been on one - looks too scary to me (even if you are more securely fastened in)
Here's the one I liked:



@Oh_no_she_DIDNT I haven't heard that story before but even if I had, it's a good story so thanks for sharing :) I'm cautious like you, and I agree there's probably a bit of control issue involved. I really resist when others try to push me to do something, but I will on occasion try things on my own whim that aren't necessarily risk free - though I have to be pretty certain I can handle it, I don't do stuff for the sense of risk or feeling like I overcame something, but I will do something if it looks fun/interesting. One story I know I've mentioned before is randomly climbing up ruined castle walls because I was just curious to see what was up there, to see the view - so I was mentally focused on something other than what would happen if I fell.

and one more mild thrill for me is standing outside when a thunderstorm is rolling in and the wind is all gusty and there's just this sense of energy in the air. If I'm not trying to go anywhere in it, I really enjoy just feeling strong wind almost lifting me up as I stand still and lean into it. that makes me feel realy alive :)


I'm not a thrill seeker. I am impulsive when it comes to what gives me pleasure, but its pretty tame. I think I fear death, afraid that I will make a choice that will lead to my death.
I don't think I fear death itself so much as pain. I've discovered my fear of pain is way out of proportin to how I actually feel when things happen to me. ...like the very thought of getting a papercut makes me queasy and I inwardly shudder... but... it's just a papercut, and I've dealt with hundreds before. Even when I know something won't be that bad, I still avoid any pain like the plague.
 

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I'm not a thrill seeker. I am impulsive when it comes to what gives me pleasure, but its pretty tame. I think I fear death, afraid that I will make a choice that will lead to my death.
 
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