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Hey, I am a ENFJ and I am seriously thinking about being a psychologist.

I have heard that ENFJ's make good psychologists, but I just really wanted to know what type of strengths you need and how long am I looking at in university.

I love helping people but I tend to get very emotionally attached to people who confide in me. Would this be a problem ?
if so I will try my hardest to improve because there is nothing else that I feel passionate about and I really want to make this work. Please share your thoughts.

Thank you ,
 

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One of my psychology professors (ENFP) had to leave private practice because the stress was affecting her physical health. She did it for 6 years & then became a school counselor, then college professor. She said that you really have to be able to emotionally disconnect from the client/patient & be focused & objective or it will wear you out. I worked at a treatment center for 7 months & it burned me out. But, some can do it for decades. As a major, psychology was the most fascinating subject I've ever studied. I regret that I dropped out just to move 1,000 miles away from my ex.
 
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I know very little about psychologists (sorry!) but I'd imagine that as an ENFJ you'd be very good at it. You'd be kind and accepting and interested. The one problem I've heard of, though, is that everything does become very normal. It's possible to become numb to people's problems or (more likely for you, perhaps) very depressed and weighed-down by them. So you might find it difficult doing this; I know I'd find it hard. But your empathy would also make you very caring and understanding. I find it admirable that you want to be a psychologist and help people, by the way. It's a great thing to be, and good psychologists are surprisingly scarce. But in the end, you're the only one who can decide if you'd be able to cope with the emotional attatchment. I hope you find the answer, anyway. :)
 

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I worked in the field and with some psychologists. I agree with Aqualung, you cant get attached to your patients. I cant stress this enough. You will end up bringing all of their problems home with you, and hence no rest, no sleep. You also need to be prepared for a commitment and a long one.

Strengths obviously the desire to help people get to where they want to be. A non judgmental attitude, cause you are going to hear things that will shock you. A bit of discernment is also vital, those who you help may lie about things and try to get you to think or believe something.
 

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Psychologist is PhD level in every state that I know of, so you're talking undergrad plus, on average, 7 years past that for the PhD.

xNFJs strongly tend towards Psychodynamic therapy. As a PhD, you will be strongly encouraged, if not mandated, to adopt Cognitive-Behavioral practice. Be sure that you can reconcile the two.

And like others have said, be sure you can detach.
 

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It's a very heavy field, and can be very taxing depending on with which population you work. I am currently working on entering graduate school to become a Doctor of Psychology and am currently a therapist. I have done most of my research and clinical work in mental health and I remember during my internship when my favorite patient was being discharged. It crushed me, and I don't let myself become attached to people very easily. Eventually, I think you can learn to detached, but it's really hard to find the best balance for therapeutic rapport while remaining detached.

Apart from the intense and costly training (get ready for lots of loans unless you're very wealthy :happy:) becoming a psychologist is heavily research oriented. As the etiology of the word indicates, the study of the psyche. There are tons of papers, statistics, research, clinical experimentation, standardized testing.

Perhaps look into counseling-type degrees as these would allow for much more face to face clinical work with clients.

Getting attached is also very dangerous and countertransference can be very hazardous to a person's psyche, and your own.
You will learn in school how to deal with these issues, and soak up supervision like a sponge.

So, if what you like the most is working with people, the actual title of psychologist involves much more research, testing, and paperwork than I think anyone really anticipates.

At the hospital I most recently worked (a state psychiatric facility) the psychologists hardly ever saw patients and were bogged-down with testing and paperwork.

But I have learned the hard way, you HAVE to leave work at work, and it's especially hard when you're so involved with helping people as a therapist/psychologist.

The good news is, there are so many options of how to work and function in a psychology-type career that isn't actually a career as a "psychologist."
 
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