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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
When I was 13 I ended up facing my biggest fear, at the time-a break in. I remember waking up to the sound of two of my three dogs yelping, in the office room(which is where they were kept, in kennels), the room next to mine at the end of an L shaped hallway that lead to the kitchen/family room. Now, both of my parents were to be at work and I was an only child. My parents never came home early from work. I could only remember two times it happened before. Only us three lived in that house at the time. So my first thought was, "Did they manage to somehow get out of their kennels and start fighting(they often fought)?" Then I heard a groaning noise. It sounded like a man's voice. I couldn't identify it, though. I started to feel a sinking feeling in my chest. After the groan, the yelping stopped for a minute and I heard the sliding glass door to the office(which lead to the back porch) slam shut.

Now I thought, "If that for any reason were my dad, why didn't he shut the door first, then deal with the dogs?" It'd make more sense, because that would prevent them from escaping so he could place them in the kennels. If someone tended to the dogs before being concerned about the door, they must have been some immediate threat. Then the yelping began again. At this point I was pretty sure someone was breaking in. My brain immediately froze, for a second or two and I became overwhelmed with fear. Then I thought, "I have to call the police." There was a phone right next to me, but just before I reached for it, I thought, "I haven't even seen what's going on. I have no proof someone is trying to break in. It could just be my dad(however much I doubted it). The last thing I need are cops showing up for nothing. I don't have anything to run with right now."

So I decided I would fight back, but cautiously, regardless of how scared I was. Not doing anything could get me killed. So I picked up the back half(the thick half) of a two piece, screw-on pool stick and walked slowly towards my bedroom door, which was closed. I wanted to swing my door open and go help my dogs, but I decided it was too risky. I didn't know if the office was open or closed and opening the door could give away the element of surprise, which I needed because I was only 13 and had no idea who I was dealing with. So I waited beside my door. I doubted they would open a closed room, not knowing what was inside, before checking the rest of the house. So I was pretty confident they would pass by, when they finished with the dogs. My plan was to sneak up behind them after they walked by my door and give em' the hardest whack to the back of their head I could dish out.

As I was waiting, I was trying to size up the situation. I could tell, by the way things sounded, there was only one man in the office. Next thing I knew, the dogs stopped yelping. I then heard the office door open and close quietly, again arousing my suspicions of a break-in. It could've been my dad, knowing I was sleeping trying to be quiet, but after all of that noise why try to close a door quietly? It seemed odd. I then listened for footsteps to pass by my room. Once they passed, I counted to 3, in order to put a little space between us so I could open my door without the man hearing.

When I opened my door, I saw the garage door down the hall open and the garage light was on. There was no car in the garage. At this point I know it's real. I pretty much immediately froze in fear. It was paralyzing, but I shook it off after a few seconds. I quietly walked down the hall and checked my open bathroom, just to be sure there was no one who could pop out behind me as I made my way to the garage. It was empty. I moved to the corner of the L shaped hallway and peeked around the corner to make sure no one was in sight. No one was. I then made my way next to my garage door and stood there in wait for the man, holding my pool stick up for a home run swing. I heard a few noises, small bumps and bangs. I then saw a shadow creep up to the door. When I could tell the man was right next to the door, I knew he'd see me if he walked through the door so I decided to use the element of surprise and sacrifice the back-of-the-head swing, going right for the face. I jumped around the corner of the doorway and lifted up the EDIT:pool stick, like a bat to swing. I then noticed immediately it WAS in fact my dad and pulled back. He was pretty quick to jump out of the way though, even though I didn't swing, haha.

Anyways, long story. I know it seems pretty obvious, based on what I wrote what was being used. My question is though, if I were a thinker wouldn't I have realized this fear was a bit irrational in the first place? Wouldn't my emotions have been lesser(that was extreme panic and fear, I experienced)? It just seems to me like a thinker would have been more cool, calm and collected. Or maybe my idea of cool, calm and collected is a bit off.

If you've stuck with me this far, could you give me your thoughts on this? Maybe help me better understand the difference between the Feeling and Thinking preferences.

Thanks guys.

Edit: Sorry if I left out a few details. It's pretty early in the morning and I'm extremely tired. Also, I'm not used to telling stories or describing things to others, so it might have a few blank spots or places where more information could be added.
 

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Situations like that tend to invoke behaviour quite different from what's normal for the individual, imho. I'm no expert (not even close), but I think what you did was just a normal (or actually - rather bold) reaction for a 13-year-old. I'm more inclined to think of it as an SP thing first and foremost - you decided to act instead of sitting around and pondering what the hell was going on (an N approach). It was also rather T-ish in nature, as you were careful along the way and kept it cool for someone going through something like that. A Feeler probably wouldn't have been as cautions and methodical (you checked the bathroom, considered the element of surprise, etc.), caught up in emotions/fear and not reasoning properly.

My best friend is an ISTP and I can definitely imagine her acting the same way.

Still, that's just my opinion. In any case - kudos for the courage!
 

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... My question is though, if I were a thinker wouldn't I have realized this fear was a bit irrational in the first place? Wouldn't my emotions have been lesser(that was extreme panic and fear, I experienced)? It just seems to me like a thinker would have been more cool, calm and collected. Or maybe my idea of cool, calm and collected is a bit off.
The fight-or-flight response really cannot be covered by MBTI theory. It is something very primordial. The brain wiring for it is probably like a short-circuit that bypasses all this higher level thinking and emotions described in MBTI because in situations like this suppose it was a bear and not your dad, then you need to react lightening fast and don't have time to just stand there while you 'logic' out the situation.
 
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