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...And then it struck me....by fond use of my Ne......if only I used less of that (Ne) and more of my inferior Si....I could be a frickin billionaire.....And on that note, I wonder if Travie McCoy is ENFP :wink: HA

In the introverted attitude, sensation "is based predominantly on the subjective component of perception." The person is "guided by the intensity of subjective sensation excited by the objective stimulus" (Jung, 1971, p. 395). The individual perceives stimuli from the environment, but almost as if through a filter. A painter, for example, may look at the seas and paint a dark scene with dead fish floating under the surface, though none are visible to other persons.

In order to develop introverted sensing, you will need to have two goals: becoming orientedto the inner subjective self, and seeing the world through the filter of your subjective perceptions. If you tend to see things as they are in reality, you may find this difficult, for the process involves seeing underneath or behind that reality. Our suggestions on this page may be helpful. Start a collection. Think of a theme that appeals to you because of its underlying or symbolic nature. You might be drawn to birds as they represent freedom--you could collect bird figurines or sightings of birds. You might be interested in antique dolls or toy trains because of childhood associations. Do not choose something that appeals to you only on the surface. Look for a personal meaning clinging to the objects. Initially do not talk about your collection to others or put it on display; this is a personal project.

Which sense appeals to you the most? Do you like touching, hearing, seeing, smelling, or tasting? Choose one of the senses. Collect a series of objects related to that sense; for example, you might obtain fabrics that have a different feel to them--velvet, silk, cotton, wool, or spices and herbs with different fragrances--garlic, nutmeg, sorrel, rosemary. Set aside a quiet time and simply experience these objects through your senses. Then focus on what each sensation means to you personally. Velvet might remind you of an evening dress your mother wore. Silk might feel sexy to you and lead you to recall an intimate evening with your spouse or lover. Let your mind wander through the personal meaning of each sensation. Do not restrict your perceptions and move always from the sensation to the subjective. Repeat this exercise with the other senses.

When you are in a situation or location that pleases you because it excites your senses in a pleasurable way, stop in your mind and focus on the objects or people around you. What associations do you have? What personal meaning do you see? What lies underneath the surface of what you are looking at, touching, tasting, or smelling? For example, you could be out with friends for an Italian meal. There is the aroma of garlic, the taste of wine, the candles and the familiar faces of friends, the touch of the rough tablecloth or the wood beam behind you. What does each of these mean to you personally? Be quiet for a moment and look for your own meaning. Does the aroma of garlic remind you of yourself cooking spaghetti when you were a student? Does the taste of wine lead you to think of a romantic evening? Temporarily suspend all judgment and desire to see things "as they really are," for you. Repeat this exercise in different situations--but not while driving or operating equipment!

Select your favorite medium of expression, whether that be writing, drawing, talking to a friend, creating music, or sculpting. Now recall a situation or scene or location that has a personal meaning for you. Using your preferred medium, bring that scene to life as you see it. When Thomas Mann, for example, describes in words every detail of a scene, he evokes the atmosphere of the room or the personality. The French Impressionist painters reproduced their internal impressions stimulated by a scene in the real world. You do not need to be Mann or Cezanne in this exercise, but it is important to see the value and meaningfulness of using the introverted sensing function in this way. Do not worry if your product bears no resemblance to the scene! In part, this is the goal; also, there is no need to show it to anyone. Repeat this exercise if it appeals to your creative senses.

Developing introverted sensing involves seeing the world subjectively. You use your senses, but you interpret what your senses tell you in a personal way. This can be highly rewarding and creative, giving you new depths to your views of the world around you. It can also be difficult and even frightening to do. It is hard to abandon concrete reality if one is familiar with it!
So could Si be the catalist for putting all those ideas into action?


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This is rare in my life. I have only a few objects of emotional significance. A painting a friend made that she let me keep, spare keys from my first car. No wonder it's inferior...I guess Si just doesn't matter too much to me.
 

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There are lots of billionaire Nes. I watched the Social Network this weekend, and for sure Mark Z is ENTP. It did take some effort to put plans into action, but once you are passionate or have your mind set on something it's ball to the wall.
 
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