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(Sorry, I know I posted before, but I didn't know there was a questionnaire. Also, I know I come off as long-winded, but I just try to include as much detail as I can. )

1. Is there anything that may affect the way you answer the questions? For example, a stressful time, mental illness, medications, special life circumstances? Other useful information includes sex, age, and current state of mind.

I'm currently cramming three projects and long tests, if that's any help. I don't know how that will affect me, though. Probably the most that would affect me would be the "people" I'd think of in certain questions. There would always be a "what if," or a different circumstance that would change my answer entirely. I make my brain hurt.

2. What type(s) do you usually score as on tests?
INTJ (5 times) and INTP (3 times)

3. Click on this link: Flickr: Explore! Choose 2 photos and look at each for as long as you feel that you need. Copy and paste the photos here (or write the link like example: www[dot]flickr[dot]com/photos/jacoboson/8697480741/in/explore-2013-05-01), and write your impression of each of them.

(I just chose the two pictures used in the other questionnaire. I'd find it hard to narrow down two photos, and I might even subconsciously pick two that I like because I simply cannot decide which one I like more.)

A: farm9[dot]staticflickr[dot]com/8287/7704380682_4da6df716d.jpg
I like this one more. It looks more surreal and "detached" from daily life (which I think is mainly expressed in picture B), like something I might want to experience, but I won't go looking for it.

It's like one of those default screen-savers, and it looks like it's taken by someone who either waits for moments like that to come, is very good at taking "professional" photos and/or sceneries, or is very good at photoshop.

It's more gender-neutral and calming, but I don't necessarily relate it's "calmness" or "serenity" to its being gender-neutral. To me, this caters more to nature, despite it looking more "edited" or "forced." It is the situation, however, that makes it more calming than B, rather than the colours. I find B's colours easier on the eyes, but the event/situation in A has a more overall serene and capricious/magical effect.

B: farm7[dot]staticflickr[dot]com/6005/6004664548_32c083ea9f_m.jpg
This has a whimsical, feminine look to it because of the soft and warm colours. It's more personal, and it caters (?) more to daily life (because of eating). It looks like it has some warm/vintage filter, or gaussian blur (maybe).

I do like the softer effect, though, but I'd prefer if the photo focused more on food (sans the disembodied hands/arms/torso). I see this everyday, and I don't see anything special in it (in relation to A). It's not very inspiring.​

4. You are on the clock to fix something, a friend of yours sits beside you and gives a lot of interesting ideas, none of them actually help or are related to your situation, but they are still something you find interesting. What is your reaction? What do you say? What do you do? What's your train of thought?

I'll answer this under the assumption that "friend" is someone whose ideas/opinions/thoughts (not to mention company) I respect and enjoy greatly. I'll also assume that the "interesting ideas" are related thoughts to something we've talked about in the past (this is only important if I weigh "urgency" vs "interest"). It depends on how important fixing that something is, and how interesting his/her topic is. If putting off the "fixing" won't have any life-threatening consequence (note that "loss of job" is life-threatening to me), I'd entertain the ideas.

If the "fixing" is something that doesn't require a lot of thinking, most probably I'd multi-task (listening, then asking a few questions if I felt like it) unless what I'm fixing is more interesting. If "fixing" is preventing something from exploding, I'd let my friend talk, but I probably won't be as attentive. If they get too loud, I might get annoyed, but I won't "shush" them.

5a. What are some of your most important values?

Intelligence (meaning may vary), open-mindedness, variety (in that people and their interests aren't too one- or two-dimensional, but I guess this can overlap with open-mindedness), substance (yes, I know, how very precise of me), honesty, and how intriguing that person is (I don't know the noun).

(Actually, I find it easier to list what I don't like. I notice that I do this a lot whenever someone asks me about something I don't have a very strong opinion on.
Prof: So, class, which from these suggested topics do you want to debate on?
Me: Can we just rule out what we DON'T want to debate about?)

5b. Can they change? What would be the reason if they changed?

I don't think I'd remove any of them—I'd just learn to tolerate a lack of one/two/three, but not all. I won't rule out that maybe one day someone might be "the exception" to the rule; however, if they (the values) could be changed, it would depend entirely on how much I enjoy that person's company. (How I would enjoy—tolerate, I can still imaging—a person with none of those values is beyond me, though. I guess it would just happen.)

6. You are in a car with some other people, the people in the car are talking. Someone makes a claim that you see as immoral/rude/cruel. What is your inward reaction? What do you think? What do you say?

It depends on the person who said it. If the person who said it is very arrogant/conceited (especially in the manner they said the comment), I'd WANT tell that person on how and/or why he/she is wrong, but I probably won't. OR if I will, it would be a really short point/comment; I don't want to explain everything because it's probably not worth my time.

Whether I tell the person off or not depends if I think it's worth the effort. If they're people I don't want to totally rule out of my life (I may have "use" for them in the future, as harsh as that may sound), I try to avoid confrontation. If they're just badmouthing me (or someone else), I most likely wouldn't do anything. I'd have retorts in my mind, but I won't actually say them. I'm pretty hard to offend, so unless they address me directly, I probably won't say anything.

Actually, whether I take offence on what they is irrelevant because as long as I see that his/her "opinion" (stated like a fact, most likely, because that's what I'd consider arrogant) is based on absolutely nothing other than because he feels strongly about it. I won't actually argue, though—I'd just comment.

Likely scenario:
Person: "Ugh, I hate rap/screamo! It's the lowest form of music!"
Me: "How can you say that? (or "Why do you say that?") Just because you don't like it doesn't mean it's the lowest form/worth any less." (I don't like rap and screamo, though. In this scenario, it's very unlikely that I'm annoyed or angry. I just wanted to point something out, that's all.)

7a. What activities energizes you the most? Why?

I'm not fully aware of when I'm energised or not, but I find reading and playing video games the least tedious and most enjoyable tasks. I often lose track of time when I'm playing or reading something that highly interests me.

7b. What activities drains you the most? Why?

Tedious, repetitive tasks, and explaining things. I don't like them because they're tedious and repetitive, I don't like going in circles, and explaining things over and over is exasperating. (Also, large social outings/gatherings, but that's probably a given.)

8. Do you believe you are introverted or extraverted? Why do you believe that? (Please be as detailed as possible)

Introverted. Aside from the stereotypes (prefers to be alone, dislikes small-talk, small group of friends, likes reading, loves the Internet, dislikes phone calls, get tireds with big, social gatherings, etc.) I found that I also like to "observe" rather than "participate." Like all my thinking is done on the "inside" (especially with problems, I try to figure things out on my own first). I see some variables/factors/"stuff" on the outside, but do my "processing" of those things on the "inside".

I find this hard to explain. :/

9. Please describe yourself, what do you see as your greatest strengths and what do you see as your greatest weaknesses?

I like how I can be objective. I'm also pretty open-minded provided that whatever it is that would be presented to me has some backing (because I'd probably ask that person why or "How can you say that?"). When people complain to me, I try to understand why they (both the "complainer" and the one being complained about) could've said/acted/thought that. I like how honest I can be.

I've been told to be quite insensitive when dealing with others and I'm kind of working on that (but, honestly, I think that everyone is just too sensitive). I'm annoyed by too-sensitive people because I'm hard to offend and many of my friends that I like are hard to offend as well. I don't like how I constantly have to ask myself "Wait, am I allowed to say that? What if he/she gets offended? Ugh, I don't wanna deal with that. Too much drama," before saying something.

I overanalyse almost everything to the point where I sometimes make it harder for myself.

I've been told that I'm very bad at explaining things, but I don't really see this as a major issue. ("Well, I've explained it in the best way I could, and if you still can't understand it, that's not my fault.") I sometimes really don't know how to explain things any better because to me what I "explained" is already the "easiest" explanation to digest (for me), so I don't know how I'd refine it. I end up giving examples and/or showing them. I prefer showing them how I do things.

10. Please describe yourself when you are feeling stressed. How do you act and why? Real life experiences are welcome.

Group works: I am easily annoyed (more so than usual) and I hate it when I'm "in the zone" and interrupted. In groups, I want things done as fast and quickly (but still efficiently) as possible so I can get on with my life and won't have to deal with it anymore.

Example: At first it was fine when we were joking around, but then we really, really, had to be able to present our group's concept (for evaluation of our prof) in the next minute or we won't be able to start on our project. By the end, only two of us were working and the others were goofing off. My friend and I were really annoyed that we had to do everything, and that we were the only ones who actually worked. We just ignored the other group mates and finished what we had on our own (we were thinking "Fine, if you won't help us, then we'll do this ourselves. You guys won't have the right to complain later because whenever we asked for your input you never gave any. We're doing this our way, so suck it up.")

When I'm stressed with myself (inner conflict usually brought about by decision-making), I tend to get very nit-picky, delve deeper into "what ifs," have more fears regarding regretting something. I simply don't want to regret any particularly life-altering choices I've made, especially if I find that, in the future, I made the "wrong" choice. I noticed that the line between how I actually feel and what I think I should feel about a situation gets blurred, and I find it hard to separate them (if that makes any sense). I become very anxious and negative.

11. What is your "soft spot" (the area that makes you upset if people mess with)?

Questioning and doubting my knowledge and intelligence on something I'm 100% sure I know. My extent of knowledge may vary, but I do know when and what I know about something. If I'm otherwise unsure, I'd say "I'm not sure, but..." or "Maybe..." or "I think..." (this usually happens when people ask me for advice; because I'm never sure what the best action would be, I often just suggest some solutions which may appeal to them and let them pick. I don't want to force my advice on them).

Me having to explain something over and over again and being unnecessarily repetitive

12. What are most of the ideas/thoughts you get generally centered around (try to expand your answers as much as possible)?

Wondering about "what if"s and "what could've been"s ("What if there's a better solution?" "What if I missed something?") (Deep regret doesn't sit with me well.)

Thinking of the "best" solution

13. What's your opinion of getting frequent feedback on what you do? (Someone pointing out what is good, what is bad, what and how to improve) Is there a limit to how often you want feedback? If so, what is the limit?

It depends on the type of "feedback." Usually I appreciate constructive criticism over general feedback in situations that can entertain/elicit/have feedback. If it's something I can alter (and altering it really would make the end product "better"), I'd do it. The feedback, however, must have something to do with the output or what is needed and/or relevant.

Example of disliked feedback:
Me: can you text/ask ms if we still need to have in-text citation even with the source listed in a footnote? (I had to tell her to ask our prof because only this person is authorised to do so.)
Her: I think in since it is MLA we cannot have a footnote :)
(After an hour or so of waiting.)
Me: Has Ms replied yet?
Her: i didn't text her anymore
Me: Oh okay (I just decided to use in-text so I wouldn't have to ask anymore.)

I felt irritated (I didn't show her I was, though) because I didn't ask for her opinion. I just told her to ask our prof—I was looking for our prof's feedback, not hers. I don't see how she felt the need to tell me what she thought (and I can't understand why she thought I'd be satisfied with her answer). Maybe she thinks she's being helpful, but she would've been more helpful if she had just asked our prof in the first place.

I wouldn't have been annoyed in the least if she had told me a definite answer, not what she "thinks" might be "correct" or not. I didn't want to believe her because the reason why I'm asking for clarification is because I DID know that we were allowed to have footnotes (based from the link our prof gave). I found her "advice" to be wrong, and didn't like that. I don't like this type of unsolicited "advice."

14. Anything beyond what has been discussed that you would like to add?

Enneagram test: Type 5w6 SP

Function test: (I read the cognitive functions explanation on careerplanner and other sites, but I'm still confused because I THINK I'm a Ti, but unlike my Te-Ti results, I always get Ni > Ne. I don't really understand how Ni's "Aha!" moment works/looks like. I think the reason I'm having so much trouble over defining my type is that I'm not aware of which functions I'm using, thus I can't "define" them.)

I'm always Si > Se by a significant/moderate margin.
I'm always Ni > Ne by a small margin (.8-1).
My Te & Ti constantly change by small margins.
I'm always Fi > Fe by a large margin.

The "highest" four only differ slightly from each other though, so I find it hard to order them; every time I take the test the orders get messed up.

A) If I were asked to pick between two groups where Group A = the "conceptualising" group/the group that thinks of ideas/proposals (without regard to how practical it may be, because it might limit them) and Group B = the "evaluating" group that evaluates the practicality of said ideas/that "receives" the ideas that have already been refined and ready to be implemented, I'd pick Group A (given it was explicitly said that I can only belong to one group).

If the "idea" is something that is of high importance to me, I'd participate in both groups because I have to oversee whether something is done right (of course, what is "right" for me and/or the idea) or I'd drive myself crazy. Unless I'm with group mates I would specifically choose to work with, I sometimes have the mindset that "When you want something done correctly, you have to do it yourself." (Sometimes I couldn't care less.)

In problems that only go like "What can we use this extra lot for?" that's how I go about "brainstorming"—I think of a lot of plans first, and then I evaluate which one would most likely work. In the "conceptualising" phase I'd prefer not to be limited, but if the problem was given parameters (like "Oh, it should be a public/private area/establishment/building"), I'd work within them. Maybe I'd entertain some unrelated ideas and tuck them in back of my mind for future use, but would probably end up "pursuing" or "developing" the most appropriate one further (in that situation).

B) I just know what I want in the end. I don't often know how I'd go about reaching those goals, though. When I'm 100% sure I want something (I also have a hard time deciding how important something is to me), I tend to do everything in my power to "reach" or "achieve" that something.

E.g. When I wrote a research paper, apart from deciding that it absolutely had to be pop culture, related to fan fiction, and slightly controversial, I had no "narrowed-down" topic. I spent around two weeks thinking of my absolute final topic because what I did was gather sources for all my "desired" topics. I was torn between the thoughts "Should I pick the one where I had the most reference material on, or the one that I have more to say about?" I ended up picking the one that interested me more (the one I had to say more on) and made my other sources work for the topic, no matter how "obscure." I just said "I'm sure something will be there for me to use, and on the off chance that there won't be, I will make it work" (and I did).​
 

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(Sorry, I know I posted before, but I didn't know there was a questionnaire. Also, I know I come off as long-winded, but I just try to include as much detail as I can. )

1. Is there anything that may affect the way you answer the questions? For example, a stressful time, mental illness, medications, special life circumstances? Other useful information includes sex, age, and current state of mind.

I'm currently cramming three projects and long tests, if that's any help. I don't know how that will affect me, though. Probably the most that would affect me would be the "people" I'd think of in certain questions. There would always be a "what if," or a different circumstance that would change my answer entirely. I make my brain hurt.

2. What type(s) do you usually score as on tests?
INTJ (5 times) and INTP (3 times)

3. Click on this link: Flickr: Explore! Choose 2 photos and look at each for as long as you feel that you need. Copy and paste the photos here (or write the link like example: www[dot]flickr[dot]com/photos/jacoboson/8697480741/in/explore-2013-05-01), and write your impression of each of them.

(I just chose the two pictures used in the other questionnaire. I'd find it hard to narrow down two photos, and I might even subconsciously pick two that I like because I simply cannot decide which one I like more.)
A: farm9[dot]staticflickr[dot]com/8287/7704380682_4da6df716d.jpg
I like this one more. It looks more surreal and "detached" from daily life (which I think is mainly expressed in picture B), like something I might want to experience, but I won't go looking for it.

It's like one of those default screen-savers, and it looks like it's taken by someone who either waits for moments like that to come, is very good at taking "professional" photos and/or sceneries, or is very good at photoshop.

It's more gender-neutral and calming, but I don't necessarily relate it's "calmness" or "serenity" to its being gender-neutral. To me, this caters more to nature, despite it looking more "edited" or "forced." It is the situation, however, that makes it more calming than B, rather than the colours. I find B's colours easier on the eyes, but the event/situation in A has a more overall serene and capricious/magical effect.

B: farm7[dot]staticflickr[dot]com/6005/6004664548_32c083ea9f_m.jpg
This has a whimsical, feminine look to it because of the soft and warm colours. It's more personal, and it caters (?) more to daily life (because of eating). It looks like it has some warm/vintage filter, or gaussian blur (maybe).

I do like the softer effect, though, but I'd prefer if the photo focused more on food (sans the disembodied hands/arms/torso). I see this everyday, and I don't see anything special in it (in relation to A). It's not very inspiring.​

4. You are on the clock to fix something, a friend of yours sits beside you and gives a lot of interesting ideas, none of them actually help or are related to your situation, but they are still something you find interesting. What is your reaction? What do you say? What do you do? What's your train of thought?

I'll answer this under the assumption that "friend" is someone whose ideas/opinions/thoughts (not to mention company) I respect and enjoy greatly. I'll also assume that the "interesting ideas" are related thoughts to something we've talked about in the past (this is only important if I weigh "urgency" vs "interest"). It depends on how important fixing that something is, and how interesting his/her topic is. If putting off the "fixing" won't have any life-threatening consequence (note that "loss of job" is life-threatening to me), I'd entertain the ideas.

If the "fixing" is something that doesn't require a lot of thinking, most probably I'd multi-task (listening, then asking a few questions if I felt like it) unless what I'm fixing is more interesting. If "fixing" is preventing something from exploding, I'd let my friend talk, but I probably won't be as attentive. If they get too loud, I might get annoyed, but I won't "shush" them.

5a. What are some of your most important values?

Intelligence (meaning may vary), open-mindedness, variety (in that people and their interests aren't too one- or two-dimensional, but I guess this can overlap with open-mindedness), substance (yes, I know, how very precise of me), honesty, and how intriguing that person is (I don't know the noun).

(Actually, I find it easier to list what I don't like. I notice that I do this a lot whenever someone asks me about something I don't have a very strong opinion on.
Prof: So, class, which from these suggested topics do you want to debate on?
Me: Can we just rule out what we DON'T want to debate about?)

5b. Can they change? What would be the reason if they changed?

I don't think I'd remove any of them—I'd just learn to tolerate a lack of one/two/three, but not all. I won't rule out that maybe one day someone might be "the exception" to the rule; however, if they (the values) could be changed, it would depend entirely on how much I enjoy that person's company. (How I would enjoy—tolerate, I can still imaging—a person with none of those values is beyond me, though. I guess it would just happen.)

6. You are in a car with some other people, the people in the car are talking. Someone makes a claim that you see as immoral/rude/cruel. What is your inward reaction? What do you think? What do you say?

It depends on the person who said it. If the person who said it is very arrogant/conceited (especially in the manner they said the comment), I'd WANT tell that person on how and/or why he/she is wrong, but I probably won't. OR if I will, it would be a really short point/comment; I don't want to explain everything because it's probably not worth my time.

Whether I tell the person off or not depends if I think it's worth the effort. If they're people I don't want to totally rule out of my life (I may have "use" for them in the future, as harsh as that may sound), I try to avoid confrontation. If they're just badmouthing me (or someone else), I most likely wouldn't do anything. I'd have retorts in my mind, but I won't actually say them. I'm pretty hard to offend, so unless they address me directly, I probably won't say anything.

Actually, whether I take offence on what they is irrelevant because as long as I see that his/her "opinion" (stated like a fact, most likely, because that's what I'd consider arrogant) is based on absolutely nothing other than because he feels strongly about it. I won't actually argue, though—I'd just comment.

Likely scenario:
Person: "Ugh, I hate rap/screamo! It's the lowest form of music!"
Me: "How can you say that? (or "Why do you say that?") Just because you don't like it doesn't mean it's the lowest form/worth any less." (I don't like rap and screamo, though. In this scenario, it's very unlikely that I'm annoyed or angry. I just wanted to point something out, that's all.)

7a. What activities energizes you the most? Why?

I'm not fully aware of when I'm energised or not, but I find reading and playing video games the least tedious and most enjoyable tasks. I often lose track of time when I'm playing or reading something that highly interests me.

7b. What activities drains you the most? Why?

Tedious, repetitive tasks, and explaining things. I don't like them because they're tedious and repetitive, I don't like going in circles, and explaining things over and over is exasperating. (Also, large social outings/gatherings, but that's probably a given.)

8. Do you believe you are introverted or extraverted? Why do you believe that? (Please be as detailed as possible)

Introverted. Aside from the stereotypes (prefers to be alone, dislikes small-talk, small group of friends, likes reading, loves the Internet, dislikes phone calls, get tireds with big, social gatherings, etc.) I found that I also like to "observe" rather than "participate." Like all my thinking is done on the "inside" (especially with problems, I try to figure things out on my own first). I see some variables/factors/"stuff" on the outside, but do my "processing" of those things on the "inside".

I find this hard to explain. :/

9. Please describe yourself, what do you see as your greatest strengths and what do you see as your greatest weaknesses?

I like how I can be objective. I'm also pretty open-minded provided that whatever it is that would be presented to me has some backing (because I'd probably ask that person why or "How can you say that?"). When people complain to me, I try to understand why they (both the "complainer" and the one being complained about) could've said/acted/thought that. I like how honest I can be.

I've been told to be quite insensitive when dealing with others and I'm kind of working on that (but, honestly, I think that everyone is just too sensitive). I'm annoyed by too-sensitive people because I'm hard to offend and many of my friends that I like are hard to offend as well. I don't like how I constantly have to ask myself "Wait, am I allowed to say that? What if he/she gets offended? Ugh, I don't wanna deal with that. Too much drama," before saying something.

I overanalyse almost everything to the point where I sometimes make it harder for myself.

I've been told that I've very bad at explaining things, but I don't really see this as a major issue. ("Well, I've explained it in the best way I could, and if you still can't understand it, that's not my fault.") Some people, though, I genuinely want to help, but I sometimes really don't know how to explain things because to me what I "explained" is already the "easiest" explanation to digest (for me), so I don't know how I'd refine it. I end up giving examples, or showing them. I prefer showing them how I do things.

10. Please describe yourself when you are feeling stressed. How do you act and why? Real life experiences are welcome.

Group works: I am easily annoyed (more so than usual) and I hate it when I'm "in the zone" and interrupted. In groups, I want things done as fast and quickly (but still efficiently) as possible so I can get on with my life and won't have to deal with it anymore. I get annoyed with people who don't do anything (but this has little to do with stress as I'm usually annoyed by this all the time) despite being told to do so.

When I'm stressed with myself (inner conflict, I guess), I tend to get very nit-picky, delve deeper into "what ifs," have more fears regarding regretting something. I simply don't want to regret any particularly life-altering choices I've made, especially if I find that, in the future, I made the "wrong" choice. I noticed that the line between how I actually feel and what I think I should feel about a situation gets blurred, and I find it hard to separate them (if that makes any sense).

11. What is your "soft spot" (the area that makes you upset if people mess with)?

Questioning and doubting my knowledge and intelligence on something I'm 100% sure I know. My extent of knowledge may vary, but I do know when and what I know about something. If I'm otherwise unsure, I'd say "I'm not sure, but..." or "Maybe..." or "I think..." (this usually happens when people ask me for advice; because I'm never sure what the best action would be, I often just suggest some solutions which may appeal to them and let them pick. I don't want to force my advice on them).

Me having to explain something over and over again
Being irritatingly repetitive

Example:
Person: What do you want for break fast and lunch?
Me: *thinks what I want for breakfast, but takes a very long time and, because I don't want my meals to repeat, ends up also thinking of lunch and dinner*
Person: What do you want? (repeat every 10 seconds) Uy! (repeat every 3 seconds)
Me: Can't you see I'm thinking?! I heard you the first time! Repeating it won't make my think faster.
Person: You take so long! *leaves*

12. What are most of the ideas/thoughts you get generally centered around (try to expand your answers as much as possible)?

Wondering about "what if"s and "what could've been"s ("What if there's a better solution?" "What if I missed something?") (Deep regret doesn't sit with me well.)

Thinking of the "best" solution

I don't know how to expand because others I remember currently are variants of "what if"s and "what could've been"s.

13. What's your opinion of getting frequent feedback on what you do? (Someone pointing out what is good, what is bad, what and how to improve) Is there a limit to how often you want feedback? If so, what is the limit?

It depends on the type of "feedback." Usually I appreciate constructive criticism over general feedback in situations that can entertain/elicit/have feedback. If it's something I can alter (and altering it really would make the end product "better"), I'd do it. The feedback, however, must have something to do with the output or what is needed and/or relevant.

Example of disliked feedback:

Me: can you text/ask ms if we still need to have in-text citation even with the source listed in a footnote? (I had to tell her to ask our prof because only this person is authorised to do so.)
Her: I think in since it is MLA we cannot have a footnote :)
(After an hour or so of waiting.)
Me: Has Ms replied yet?
Her: i didn't text her anymore
Me: Oh okay (I just decided to use in-text so I wouldn't have to ask anymore.)

I felt irritated (I didn't show her I was, though) because I didn't ask for her opinion. I just told her to ask our prof—I was looking for our prof's feedback, not hers. I don't see how she felt the need to tell me what she thought (and I can't understand why she thought I'd be satisfied with her answer). Maybe she thinks she's being helpful, but she would've been more helpful if she had just asked our prof in the first place.

I wouldn't have been annoyed in the least if she had told me a definite answer, not what she "thinks" might be "correct" or not. I didn't want to believe her because the reason why I'm asking for clarification is because I DID know that we were allowed to have footnotes (based from the link our prof gave). I found her "advice" to be wrong, and didn't like that. I don't like this type of unsolicited "advice."

14. Anything beyond what has been discussed that you would like to add?
Enneagram test: Type 5w6 SP

Function test: (I read the cognitive functions explanation on careerplanner and other sites, but I'm still confused because I THINK I'm a Ti, but unlike my Te-Ti results, I always get Ni > Ne. I don't really understand how Ni's "Aha!" moment works/looks like. I think the reason I'm having so much trouble over defining my type is that I'm not aware of which functions I'm using, thus I can't "define" them.)

I'm always Si > Se by a significant/moderate margin.
I'm always Ni > Ne by a small margin (.8-1).
My Te & Ti constantly change by small margins.
I'm always Fi > Fe by a large margin.

The "highest" four only differ slightly from each other though, so I find it hard to order them; every time I take the test the orders get messed up.

A) If I were asked to pick between two groups where Group A = the "conceptualising" group/the group that thinks of ideas/proposals (without regard to how practical it may be, because it might limit them) and Group B = the "evaluating" group that evaluates the practicality of said ideas/that "receives" the ideas that have already been refined and ready to be implemented, I'd pick Group A (given it was explicitly said that I can only belong to one group).

If the "idea" is something that is of high importance to me, I'd participate in both groups because I have to oversee whether something is done right (of course, what is "right" for me and/or the idea) or I'd drive myself crazy. Unless I'm with group mates I would specifically choose to work with, I sometimes have the mindset that "When you want something done correctly, you have to do it yourself." (Sometimes I couldn't care less.)

In problems that only go like "What can we use this extra lot for?" that's how I go about "brainstorming"—I think of a lot of plans first, and then I evaluate which one would most likely work. In the "conceptualising" phase I'd prefer not to be limited, but if the problem was given parameters (like "Oh, it should be a public/private area/establishment/building"), I'd work within them. Maybe I'd entertain some unrelated ideas and tuck them in back of my mind for future use, but would probably end up "pursuing" or "developing" the most appropriate one further (in that situation).

B) I just know what I want in the end. I don't often know how I'd go about reaching those goals, though. When I'm 100% sure I want something (I also have a hard time deciding how important something is to me), I tend to do everything in my power to "reach" or "achieve" that something.

E.g. When I wrote a research paper, apart from deciding that it absolutely had to be pop culture, related to fan fiction, and slightly controversial, I had no "narrowed-down" topic. I spent around two weeks thinking of my absolute final topic because what I did was gather sources for all my "desired" topics. I was torn between the thoughts "Should I pick the one where I had the most reference material on, or the one that I have more to say about?" I ended up picking the one that interested me more (the one I had to say more on) and made my other sources work for the topic, no matter how "obscure." I just said "I'm sure something will be there for me to use, and on the off chance that there won't be, I will make it work" (and I did).​
From skimming your response to the questionnaire, you certainly sound more like an INTJ than an INTP; in the least, you sound a lot like me. However, as I'm still a bit uncertain of both my personality type and my complete understanding of the cognitive functions, I would suggest that you get more responses from other individuals.
 

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You're not very aware of your personal needs; this is expressed with Si, which would be your 8th function if your 4th is Se. You're often thinking about possibilities, perhaps all the time, and inevitably want to find the "truth", the single answer. You couldn't care less if someone doesn't get you, and prefer reputations remain in pristine condition, else you simply cut the offending person off; this self-governing approach to relationships, albeit low, would be accounted for with tertiary Fi. Finally: you put great importance on your knowledge. This is 100% Te; Ti users aren't concerned with what they know, they want to figure things out on the fly; they care about systems, generic ways to solve many problems, as opposed to Te users who gather/collect information and store it for later. Ti wants to figure out how it works and can work for them, the subjective knowledge of an object; Te wants to know its properties and efficiently organize them, the objective knowledge of an object.

You also get stuck in what's known as Ni-Fi loops: Ni presents a "what if", Fi says "Was it the right thing to do?", Ni presents more "what if"s based on Fi, on and on; you might relate to The Scientist by Coldplay. You break them by using your Te. All types get it when they're stressed, I believe; INFJs get a Ni-Ti loop, which is more like, Ni presents a "what if", Ti says "Well logically speaking...", on and on until a conspiracy theory is born about Hitler actually being an alien from Jupiter or something :p We break it by seeking validation from our peers; Fe says, "Yeah no, everyone thinks it's crazy, so that's probably the case."

Also, in my case, I have both a developed Fe and Fi, which is my 2nd function; I don't know if this correlates to your Te/Ti 2nd function mix-up, but you can't have two introverted functions on top, as you'd go in circles forever (as is the case with 1st-3rd function loops.) If you truly are an introvert, and you seem to be to me, then your 2nd function will be extroverted, which would mean you prefer Te over Ti.

Anyway, if this all sounds right to you, then your function stack is:

INTJ
Ni
Te
Fi
Se
 

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You're not very aware of your personal needs; this is expressed with Si, which would be your 8th function if your 4th is Se. You're often thinking about possibilities, perhaps all the time, and inevitably want to find the "truth", the single answer. You couldn't care less if someone doesn't get you, and prefer reputations remain in pristine condition, else you simply cut the offending person off; this self-governing approach to relationships, albeit low, would be accounted for with tertiary Fi. Finally: you put great importance on your knowledge. This is 100% Te; Ti users aren't concerned with what they know, they want to figure things out on the fly; they care about systems, generic ways to solve many problems, as opposed to Te users who gather/collect information and store it for later. Ti wants to figure out how it works and can work for them, the subjective knowledge of an object; Te wants to know its properties and efficiently organize them, the objective knowledge of an object.

You also get stuck in what's known as Ni-Fi loops: Ni presents a "what if", Fi says "Was it the right thing to do?", Ni presents more "what if"s based on Fi, on and on; you might relate to The Scientist by Coldplay. You break them by using your Te. All types get it when they're stressed, I believe; INFJs get a Ni-Ti loop, which is more like, Ni presents a "what if", Ti says "Well logically speaking...", on and on until a conspiracy theory is born about Hitler actually being an alien from Jupiter or something :p We break it by seeking validation from our peers; Fe says, "Yeah no, everyone thinks it's crazy, so that's probably the case."

Also, in my case, I have both a developed Fe and Fi, which is my 2nd function; I don't know if this correlates to your Te/Ti 2nd function mix-up, but you can't have two introverted functions on top, as you'd go in circles forever (as is the case with 1st-3rd function loops.) If you truly are an introvert, and you seem to be to me, then your 2nd function will be extroverted, which would mean you prefer Te over Ti.

Anyway, if this all sounds right to you, then your function stack is:

INTJ
Ni
Te
Fi
Se
Yep. I totally agree with this. Not to make a claim with no evidence to back it up, but I totally noticed the whole Ni-Fi loop when I was first reading over the OP's questionnaire too.

@FluffySheep, do you tend to become depressed?

Also, in a recent post, this is how I described my Ni-Fi loop. Take a look at the other information if you feel inclined:

"Of course. I think that I tend to have an Ni-Fi loop on often, but in spurts. To give a specific example, two nights ago I had a massive freakout at like 3-4am. I had convinced myself that my closest friend didn't care about me anymore. I'd noticed that she wasn't texting me often, we weren't talking like we were used to, and it really didn't help that she has a new boy toy. So I panicked. I sat in my bed simply freaking out and overanalyzing the entire last few weeks. I would find all the evidence I could to support this theory, and ignore any rational arguments against it. To some extent I still believe that this theory might be true, but for now I'm not making a large deal of it.

Does that answer your question?

I found some information about Ni-Fi loop if you're interested:
http://personalitycafe.com/intj-forum-scientists/37673-ni-fi-loop.html
http://personalitycafe.com/articles/25205-dominant-tertiary-loops-common-personality-disorders.html"
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
You're not very aware of your personal needs; this is expressed with Si, which would be your 8th function if your 4th is Se. You're often thinking about possibilities, perhaps all the time, and inevitably want to find the "truth", the single answer. You couldn't care less if someone doesn't get you, and prefer reputations remain in pristine condition, else you simply cut the offending person off; this self-governing approach to relationships, albeit low, would be accounted for with tertiary Fi. Finally: you put great importance on your knowledge. This is 100% Te; Ti users aren't concerned with what they know, they want to figure things out on the fly; they care about systems, generic ways to solve many problems, as opposed to Te users who gather/collect information and store it for later. Ti wants to figure out how it works and can work for them, the subjective knowledge of an object; Te wants to know its properties and efficiently organize them, the objective knowledge of an object.

You also get stuck in what's known as Ni-Fi loops: Ni presents a "what if", Fi says "Was it the right thing to do?", Ni presents more "what if"s based on Fi, on and on; you might relate to The Scientist by Coldplay. You break them by using your Te. All types get it when they're stressed, I believe; INFJs get a Ni-Ti loop, which is more like, Ni presents a "what if", Ti says "Well logically speaking...", on and on until a conspiracy theory is born about Hitler actually being an alien from Jupiter or something :p We break it by seeking validation from our peers; Fe says, "Yeah no, everyone thinks it's crazy, so that's probably the case."

Also, in my case, I have both a developed Fe and Fi, which is my 2nd function; I don't know if this correlates to your Te/Ti 2nd function mix-up, but you can't have two introverted functions on top, as you'd go in circles forever (as is the case with 1st-3rd function loops.) If you truly are an introvert, and you seem to be to me, then your 2nd function will be extroverted, which would mean you prefer Te over Ti.

Anyway, if this all sounds right to you, then your function stack is:

INTJ
Ni
Te
Fi
Se
It sounds a lot like me; thank you for the insight. I really appreciate how you broke it down to the cognitive functions because that's what I failed to apply to myself. Now that I understand how I became an INTJ, I can finally be at ease typing myself as one.

[...] [D]o you tend to become depressed?

I found some information about Ni-Fi loop if you're interested
Thank you for the links, I really appreciate it. Yes, I do get depressed sometimes and they seem to come out of nowhere. I sometimes even think they're irrational fears because it seemed like I was the only who thought like that among my friends.

I got RLOEI from the SLOAN/Big 5 test. (Yeah... I forgot to mention that. Oops.) I think my somewhat pessimistic side just loved answering the anxiety-related questions, and my nagging "what if" voice had a field day with future-related questions lol
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You're not very aware of your personal needs; this is expressed with Si, which would be your 8th function if your 4th is Se. You're often thinking about possibilities, perhaps all the time, and inevitably want to find the "truth", the single answer. You couldn't care less if someone doesn't get you, and prefer reputations remain in pristine condition, else you simply cut the offending person off; this self-governing approach to relationships, albeit low, would be accounted for with tertiary Fi. Finally: you put great importance on your knowledge. This is 100% Te; Ti users aren't concerned with what they know, they want to figure things out on the fly; they care about systems, generic ways to solve many problems, as opposed to Te users who gather/collect information and store it for later. Ti wants to figure out how it works and can work for them, the subjective knowledge of an object; Te wants to know its properties and efficiently organize them, the objective knowledge of an object.

You also get stuck in what's known as Ni-Fi loops: Ni presents a "what if", Fi says "Was it the right thing to do?", Ni presents more "what if"s based on Fi, on and on; you might relate to The Scientist by Coldplay. You break them by using your Te. All types get it when they're stressed, I believe; INFJs get a Ni-Ti loop, which is more like, Ni presents a "what if", Ti says "Well logically speaking...", on and on until a conspiracy theory is born about Hitler actually being an alien from Jupiter or something :p We break it by seeking validation from our peers; Fe says, "Yeah no, everyone thinks it's crazy, so that's probably the case."

Also, in my case, I have both a developed Fe and Fi, which is my 2nd function; I don't know if this correlates to your Te/Ti 2nd function mix-up, but you can't have two introverted functions on top, as you'd go in circles forever (as is the case with 1st-3rd function loops.) If you truly are an introvert, and you seem to be to me, then your 2nd function will be extroverted, which would mean you prefer Te over Ti.

Anyway, if this all sounds right to you, then your function stack is:

INTJ
Ni
Te
Fi
Se
Sorry for the double post, but I only just thought of this recently. How were you able to identify that I was a Ni-dominant? I find that function especially difficult to pin down, understand and apply.

I don't have ground-breaking "insights" or "Eureka!" moments that a lot of people are referring to. Maybe I just don't have enough information, or my brain just doesn't think/process information that way.

How thin is the line between subconsciously using Ni while just not being aware of it, and not having Ni at all? I feel like I don't use Ni (or if I have, I don't remember them at all).
 

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Sorry for the double post, but I only just thought of this recently. How were you able to identify that I was a Ni-dominant? I find that function especially difficult to pin down, understand and apply.

I don't have ground-breaking "insights" or "Eureka!" moments that a lot of people are referring to. Maybe I just don't have enough information, or my brain just doesn't think/process information that way.

How thin is the line between subconsciously using Ni while just not being aware of it, and not having Ni at all? I feel like I don't use Ni (or if I have, I don't remember them at all).
It's not so much about having moments (unless you have Ni closer to the bottom of your stack, in which you would rarely use it and would see it as an "ah-hah" moment); if I could describe it, it's the difference between existing in the real world, and existing in your head. People who are Se-dom spend the majority of their time in the real world, with the occasional expedition into the subconscious; Ni-dom spend the majority of their time in their heads, with the occasional expedition outside of it. In my case, being a Ni-dom myself, I find it very difficult to get out of it; if there's something I need to ponder on, and there's never a shortage, then I will ponder, and must continue on every tangent until I've finally "processed" everything I need to. Because my Ni is so great, my Se suffers, and so sits at the bottom of the stack (excluding the shadow functions of course); in turn, I am not very active, and opt to stay at home or in a comfortable quiet place where I can have a good think. They're directly related, I believe; you're either giving up your Se to use your Ni or giving up your Ni to use your Se; I think I'd have to be some kind of super-genius to use both effectively and equally at once, even while I'm taking a stroll down the street I'm deeply lost in thought and can't do much else but that; if I begin to exercise, my Ni switches off and I focus on that exercise. You can get lost in thought playing a classic RPG, for example; there isn't as much being demanded from you. However, playing an arcade fighter, or perhaps a FPS, you allow your Se to take over and Ni shuts up for a while.

I'm not sure if you subconsciously use your Ni; I suppose it's possible, if the only condition is that you're unaware you're using your Ni, but once you understand what Ni is, it's easy to spot. I'm using it right now to answer your question :) Probably along with a healthy amount of Ne.

Oh: and to answer your question about how I know you're a Ni-dom, the answer is, I don't; I had a hunch, based on an aggregate of unconscious realizations, that you were a Ni-dom :p I could absolutely be wrong. But Ni-doms tend to ask questions and spend lots of time on the Interwebs, so I figured, it's possible, since all the other pieces fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Oh, I see. Well, I guess for now I can live under "INTJ" and study on Ni a bit then make my final decision then. Thanks for the answers. :)

(But if anyone wants to take a guess, please do so.)
 
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