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aspergers is supposedly a milder form of autism

how do you know someone you are talking to online--eg, on forums like this--has aspergers or autism?

what are the best ways to handle these interactions?

thanks
 

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EvilShoutyRudolph
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If they keep on talking talking about Minecraft. That's all I've got!
 

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My sister has Aspergers. You cannot tell since much of society is a bit socially awkward these days. She hates mine craft btw :p She likes Pokémon. Also technically Aspergers is not a diagnosis anymore, it's just under th spectrum umbrella that is Autism.

I would say treat them normally, if they are saying something inappropriate and they have 'aspergers' they should be able to comprehend what they did wrong if you explain. It also depends on their age, as like most people they do learn more through time and experience.
 

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As someone with autism and has met plenty of people online who claim to have it, I can safely say you can't tell when someone online is on the spectrum. It's a learning disability; not a personality disorder. People on the autism spectrum have a wide range of personalities and interests.

I will say that I resent people who constantly use their diagnoses ((or self-diagnosis)) as an excuse for their mistakes. It's human to make mistakes and you don't need autism to make them. Some people I've met say they have autism within the first 5 minutes of meeting them and I'm just like "...Really?" I don't get why make a big deal out of it, honestly, or any of the people who declare their disability or mental illness so early upon meeting since it's like they want to be treated special for it or use it as an excuse. As someone with autism, I find those types of people to be a bit offensive. The best thing those of us on the spectrum can do is to research autism and be aware of how it affects us so our own behavior can be our own responsibility and not the responsibility of somebody else to "understand". Most people are not going to understand someone who says "I have autism". They're more likely to judge than anything else. I only mention autism to people who I've known a long time or when I'm on this forum, since this is a psych-based forum and I don't connect this account to any of my other internet accounts or people I know in real life.

Really, just treat others the way you'd like to be treated, whether they're on the autism spectrum, have a mental disorder or anything else. I know in my case I'd rather just be treated like any regular person. Communicating in real life is far more difficult than online.
 

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My sister has Aspergers. You cannot tell since much of society is a bit socially awkward these days. She hates mine craft btw :p She likes Pokémon. Also technically Aspergers is not a diagnosis anymore, it's just under th spectrum umbrella that is Autism.

I would say treat them normally, if they are saying something inappropriate and they have 'aspergers' they should be able to comprehend what they did wrong if you explain. It also depends on their age, as like most people they do learn more through time and experience.
I have always been both curious and annoyed why a lot of parents do not simply explain/thier autistic children.

I have sincerely asked -several times-“ is there some particular reason why they just can’t be taught”.
But of course they would just get angry and scream at me.

Now I know. Thank you.
 

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They can slightly develop social cognition, the ones who are more keen. What generally shows autistic spectrum is body rocking and lacking eye contact with people, but the eye contact being more likely to dart is also a sign of ADHD. Both conditions can be intrusive unintentionally.if you can hear their voice sometimes they have impediments due to language delays.
 
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I have always been both curious and annoyed why a lot of parents do not simply explain/thier autistic children.

I have sincerely asked -several times-“ is there some particular reason why they just can’t be taught”.
But of course they would just get angry and scream at me.

Now I know. Thank you.
Yea, I actually work with children who have autism (a self-contained classroom). It's within reason, if your child has autism and they are having a tantrum, they are having a tantrum like any other child. Just because it may be more extreme doesn't mean you need to simply give in because you are lazy.
If they are having a meltdown because of a sound they don't like (as in it hurts them, etc.) that is acceptable and you can help set up ways for them to get through it.
 

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What I've noticed (which might be him personally or not) is that my friend with autism tends to keep on going. Once he is in for something, he won't stop till he knows every single bit of it. He easily overworks hisself if he does not know when to stop. Also, he seems oblivious to some reactions of people. The way they react to him when he says something.
Even when I show no interest in a certain topic, he will just continue because he does not get the sign. You have to tell him right in his face thats you are not interested in the current topic and/or don't really care about it.

But this might all be personal. I only know 1 person with aspergers, so I might be completely wrong.
Nonetheless, its a completely normal guy.
 

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It seems kinda common really. A lot of people I talk to online don't understand analogies, hypothetical questions, sarcasm, when someone is telling a joke, metaphors, etc. And they're really obsessive over what they're talking about and irritable in general.
 

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What I've noticed (which might be him personally or not) is that my friend with autism tends to keep on going. Once he is in for something, he won't stop till he knows every single bit of it. He easily overworks hisself if he does not know when to stop. Also, he seems oblivious to some reactions of people. The way they react to him when he says something.
Even when I show no interest in a certain topic, he will just continue because he does not get the sign. You have to tell him right in his face thats you are not interested in the current topic and/or don't really care about it.

But this might all be personal. I only know 1 person with aspergers, so I might be completely wrong.
Nonetheless, its a completely normal guy.
This has been my experience as well.
 

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My friend's brother and father are both autistic. They have been known to make foolish assumptions. One time the father was told that he was meeting a deaf person so he introduced himself very loudly. Anyway, there is a lot of anger in that family resulting from sheer stupidity at times.

There's something in posture and animation that seems awkward. Discomfort in one's own body kind of thing. Otherwise, there is an aura of obliviousness that they give off. Not from a lack of paying attention or not caring, just not knowing.

None of this is particularly useful in an online environment such as this one. I don't see how one would know from text. If you view me as someone bouncing off walls and full of energy then you'd be sorely disappointed if you actually saw me. Of course I have "Aspergers" as well. So far I have only heard that "something is off" about me. But put into context and I'm not much like the average guy because I don't anything that anyone is aware of.
 

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I don't know they have autism unless they say so.

All autistic traits appear, at varying degrees, within general society anyway. Online interaction is too narrow a setting to accurately determine a condition like autism (and many others). If I'm aware of someone having autism, I will make allowances for it. I might explain myself differently or lay off of very dry humour and subtle jokes. At least until I've some idea of their abilities in that area. I would do the same with someone who I knew well enough to realise they might not pick up on particular things too, whether it was due to autism or not.

I appreciate being told they have autism because I simply use the information as something of a shortcut to understanding more about them. I don't see it as a request for special treatment, just information sharing to make communication easier. Understanding is after all, the main goal of communication. Unfortunately, not everyone uses that kind of information in the same way and some people exploit their potential weaknesses to 1up them in debates and stuff, which is quite pathetic, imo.
 

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It's definitely harder to spot someone like that online, than in real life.
Although if you know that they are on spectrum, then I guess you should direct with whatever you want to say to them.
 

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Depends on the severity. Some autists I've met, I'd never suspect it unless they told me. The more severe ones, I notice an obsessive quality in them of some sort. There was an autist who used the online handle "Ulillillia" whose website was an incredibly indepth chronicling and analysis of everything about him, things no non-autist would ever care about. It was obsessive. Female autists are rarer but one I've met seems compelled to dominate conversations.
 
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