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Hi,

I'm curious, is what you do for a living one of the occupations that is listed as a suggested career for an INFJ? I majored in Finance and Economics in college and i've been an analyst and an auditor so far. I think I've realized that these jobs don't "fit" me very well. However, this is the only experience I have, and I do find most of it interesting.

So if you've realized that what you do isn't right for you, that something else is a better fit, how did you respond?

If you did find something that was the right fit for you, did you always know?

I know people can function in almost any job regardless of type, but I'm curious to know if people gravitate towards jobs that they might be more likely to be interested in (according to the test) vs. if people took a job not on the list for whatever reason.
 

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I've just resigned from my job as an Administrator in a Human Resources department. I enjoyed working there and I got on quite well with my colleagues. My particular role within the team didn't have too many responsibilities so I could pretty much manage my own workload and set myself projects. I also worked 3 days a week so I had plenty of time to myself.

There was a time where I had to cover for someone who went off sick. This meant I had to take on more responsibility and work full-time. I found this to be too stressful and did not enjoy it. In fact I found that it was making me feel ill. I don't know if this is because i'm and INFJ or not. I can be quite a perfectionist and I have a bad habit of not asking for help when I need it! So I end up putting too much pressure on myself, therefore getting very stressed and anxious.

When I took this job I knew I wouldn't stay in it for very long. My creative side is too strong and I feel like by not pursuing my creative interests I am denying a part of myself. I will be starting a degree in creative writing in a couple of weeks! I've thought about going into teaching as well as pursuing a career in writing. I'm passionate about learning and I'd really like to support and encourage children with their learning.
 

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For most of my life I have worked simple unskilled manual labor jobs including; working in a paper mill, painting, waxing floors at a hospital, working at a form manufacturing plant, working at a Ryder truck shop fueling and washing diesel trucks and doing light maintenance, working construction on a fiber optic cable job. I did these jobs in order to earn enough money to travel. They were simple and easy to quit, and often would hire me back when I returned. I never really felt fulfilled in these sorts of jobs, however.

At 28 I joined the Air Force as an Arabic linguist, and then got out after almost nine years. I am currently between jobs. I enjoyed parts of this, especially learning the language in Monterey, CA, and actually doing the job. What I did not like was the administrative aspects and the amount of control they had over me and my life. It was alright for a while, but it began to grow terribly tedious, and I was increasingly expected to deal with people and to lead.
 

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I have worked in IT all my career-programmer, consultant (did training support and presales work as well) Manager and now in customer cummunications. I think I fit the bill of what INFJs are meant to avoid!

I am not a fan of lists of jobs that fit personalities. Although I suspect there are very few INFJ used car sales people! - I think that other factors like type of organisation (culture, size and purpose) are much relevant factors to whether an individual will like working there. For Idealists it may be more imortant to have a strong sense of purpose in the organisation

I think it's better to think in terms of types of work rather than specific careers and jobs - for example do you like working with people?
 

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I love numbers so finance would have fit at least as a mind exercise - which by the way is an extremely rewarding use of my incredible mind.
I am a chemist and again the deep thought involved has been rewarding.
Lately I have been soul searching and came back to how incredible it has been to ponder the sciences and to use math to solve problems. After a time people become psychic on their jobs in my opinion. Perhaps INFJ more so - not sure. I can solve some problems with mostly intuition after twenty years. Others are still incredible to consider. I love thought.
 

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I have worked in IT all my career-programmer, consultant (did training support and presales work as well) Manager and now in customer cummunications. I think I fit the bill of what INFJs are meant to avoid!

I am not a fan of lists of jobs that fit personalities. Although I suspect there are very few INFJ used car sales people! - I think that other factors like type of organisation (culture, size and purpose) are much relevant factors to whether an individual will like working there. For Idealists it may be more imortant to have a strong sense of purpose in the organisation

I think it's better to think in terms of types of work rather than specific careers and jobs - for example do you like working with people?
I think you may be on to something here. I do not like working with people at all (well, maybe a little). Lock me in a room for eight hours with a task I know how to do well (translating written Arabic for example), and I will be happy. I would not even need any breaks. Do not make me analyze it or think about it. I despise office politics, administrative tasks, and dealing with and leading people. Otherwise, a nice, simple task is fine. One I do not have to think about (giving me ample time to indulge in wild flights of fantasy), and one which I do not have to take home with me. Just a simple monotonous task I can do automatically and leave at the end of the day.

While my ideal job is none (and hopefully I can achieve this. It has been five months, so far so good), I want to write. I am particularly drawn to fantasy, but more realistic fantasy. In my off time I collaborate on an upcoming online RPG game (as a volunteer), writing lore. I do not wish to actually play the game, but I love writing the lore. I think I would be quite good at organizing such a project, at least as far as the lore goes, and maybe the vision (don't ask me about programing, art, or marketing of the same). I feel that I am good at grasping the big picture and delegating tasks appropriately. I write more because I feel compelled to than out of any desire to make a living at it. I enjoy people finding some enjoyment in reading what I write. I would also like to put my own philosophy into my writing.
 

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I have worked in IT all my career-programmer, consultant (did training support and presales work as well) Manager and now in customer cummunications. I think I fit the bill of what INFJs are meant to avoid!

I am not a fan of lists of jobs that fit personalities. Although I suspect there are very few INFJ used car sales people! - I think that other factors like type of organisation (culture, size and purpose) are much relevant factors to whether an individual will like working there. For Idealists it may be more imortant to have a strong sense of purpose in the organisation

I think it's better to think in terms of types of work rather than specific careers and jobs - for example do you like working with people?
I think as an INFJ its a given that you would like to work with people. If not, then I would doubt that you are truly an NF and would suggest you are NT. Any type of feeler is going to feel more fulfillment if working towards helping people is a component.

However, my comment should not be confused with "working with colleagues" per-say, because as introverts we find working independently on projects rather than in groups to be best. My point is simply that a feeler type is naturally going to want a job that helps benefit society in some way... if that job does not focus on helping society, then I would think the feeler would be lacking an inner passion and motivation for what they are doing in their lives in the aspect of a career. Having a career that influences that inner passion creates a sense of wholeness in that we are achieving our "vision" for what we would like to accomplish in the world.

If that all makes sense -- and this is purely in reference to the INFJ, because I can describe it best for an INFJ as I am one, though I am sure other NFs can relate to some extent. For example, an ENFJ I'm sure can relate to needing to do something to influence that inner passion, but they do not relate to the need for independence.
 

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So what do I do for a living?

Well... I'm going to TRY to make a long story short. I am going to start off by saying that right now I am finishing up my college degree with my semester of student teaching and I absolutely LOVE it. I can not remember the last time (if ever) that I have felt so much fulfillment in my life. I can't imagine working in any other type of field. If someone would ask me what my dream job is, I would say teaching has to be it. I will admit that every day is absolutely terrifying -- worrying about whether the kids will actually learn something to show you are a good teacher or not... worry about whether you will be able to handle that kid that drives you crazy in your second hour class... worry about whether you have enough personal knowledge of the content in order to teach it. Its terrifying -- but the fear reminds me every day that I am living life to its fullest by challenging myself to face those fears.

It has only been my second week and I can already tell that it has made me much more confident socially. The fact that I'm in charge of a class every day and I have to manage and tell these students what to do and set the example for them pushes me in that classroom so then I more naturally do it in my daily life. It helps me to become a better individual overall.

Plus, with each lesson I can be creative in my own way to see what might motivate the kids. Though I do have to follow state standards, the class is still mine and I get to work independently in how I want to teach the material. I can satisfy my Fe by working with the students in class and helping them after class or as needed. I can satisfy my Ni by taking in what information my Ni has gathered from kids in my class and then be creative with how I plan the next lesson... while being alone during the prep/plan time so I can "recharge".

Ok, so getting off that soapbox for a while to explain the rest...
I have noticed for myself that I am happiest when in jobs that are people oriented. The jobs I've had before now include: waitress, bakery in grocery store (customer service and packing), ticket sales at sports games, financial services (working with loans, credit, insurance, etc.), research (taking samples, collecting data, using statistics to find results), then I also worked in an area of research basically doing the monotonous task of counting seeds to place in packs for planting.

Out of those, what job did I hate the most? Working in research doing monotonous tasks with no people-contact other than co-workers.

What job did I enjoy the most? Being a waitress, without a doubt. It was a lot of fun joking around with customers, meeting people of the community, and being able to help them by serving food (even though serving food is of course a minor way of helping, it still helped satisfy my desire). Bakery would be second best because it still involved people contact but there was less of it than being a waitress.
 

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I was a help teacher with kids for a while and I loved it. Probably the most exhausting job, though.
I did cleaning, and alot of jobs on the phone, which I mostly hated except for the few customers I had on the phone who I had conversations with that had nothing to do with what I was supposed to do. But within that cathegory of phone jobs, some were better than others. Inbound is ok, compared to purely outbound.
the cleaning job, it's not bad, except that I feel empty afterwards, just some wasted time ..

I think teaching is definitely worth considering. But what? And to who? ...

But what I'm really doing is "studying something with computers" and I don't really like it. Almost graduated ... help.
 

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So what do I do for a living?

Well... I'm going to TRY to make a long story short. I am going to start off by saying that right now I am finishing up my college degree with my semester of student teaching and I absolutely LOVE it. I can not remember the last time (if ever) that I have felt so much fulfillment in my life. I can't imagine working in any other type of field. If someone would ask me what my dream job is, I would say teaching has to be it. I will admit that every day is absolutely terrifying -- worrying about whether the kids will actually learn something to show you are a good teacher or not... worry about whether you will be able to handle that kid that drives you crazy in your second hour class... worry about whether you have enough personal knowledge of the content in order to teach it. Its terrifying -- but the fear reminds me every day that I am living life to its fullest by challenging myself to face those fears.

It has only been my second week and I can already tell that it has made me much more confident socially. The fact that I'm in charge of a class every day and I have to manage and tell these students what to do and set the example for them pushes me in that classroom so then I more naturally do it in my daily life. It helps me to become a better individual overall.

Plus, with each lesson I can be creative in my own way to see what might motivate the kids. Though I do have to follow state standards, the class is still mine and I get to work independently in how I want to teach the material. I can satisfy my Fe by working with the students in class and helping them after class or as needed. I can satisfy my Ni by taking in what information my Ni has gathered from kids in my class and then be creative with how I plan the next lesson... while being alone during the prep/plan time so I can "recharge".

Ok, so getting off that soapbox for a while to explain the rest...
I have noticed for myself that I am happiest when in jobs that are people oriented. The jobs I've had before now include: waitress, bakery in grocery store (customer service and packing), ticket sales at sports games, research (taking samples, collecting data, using statistics to find results), then I also worked in an area of research basically doing the monotonous task of counting seeds to place in packs for planting.
Out of those, what job did I hate the most? Working in research doing monotonous tasks with no people-contact other than co-workers.
What job did I enjoy the most? Being a waitress, without a doubt. It was a lot of fun joking around with customers, meeting people of the community, and being able to help them by serving food (even though serving food is of course a minor way of helping, it still helped satisfy my desire). Bakery would be second best because it still involved people contact but there was less of it than being a waitress.
I really enjoyed reading this, very encouraging.

Following on from my last post about how I'd like to get into teaching:

One of the reasons I thought about getting into teaching was because I had experience teaching a class when I was 18. I had developed a technique in my art class that my tutors hadn't seen before and they asked me if I could teach the class below me how to do it. This meant that I needed to put a tutorial together and then teach the group step by step how to do it. I loved that I was able to be assertive and direct, whereas in everyday conversation I worry about upsetting people by telling them what to do.

My other experience of teaching is at work. Whenever we get new staff my managers always ask if I can train them. And I quite enjoyed this too.

I just love the idea of making lessons fun and enthusiastic so that the students can pick up on the enthusiasm for what they are learning. I know that I learn much better if I am enjoying the subject that is being taught and if the teacher makes it sound exciting.
 

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I was a help teacher with kids for a while and I loved it. Probably the most exhausting job, though.
I did cleaning, and alot of jobs on the phone, which I mostly hated except for the few customers I had on the phone who I had conversations with that had nothing to do with what I was supposed to do. But within that cathegory of phone jobs, some were better than others. Inbound is ok, compared to purely outbound.
the cleaning job, it's not bad, except that I feel empty afterwards, just some wasted time ..

I think teaching is definitely worth considering. But what? And to who? ...

But what I'm really doing is "studying something with computers" and I don't really like it. Almost graduated ... help.
Here in the UK you usually teach the subject that you got your degree in. However if you want to teach younger children it doesn't matter as much which subject your degree is in because you will likely be teaching all subjects, Maths, English, Science etc.

I think you have to do 'teacher training' on top of your degree. This can either be done on the job (earning money at the same time) or by completing another year at university to study teaching (which will cost you money).

I don't know if this is the same for other countries.
 

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I really enjoyed reading this, very encouraging.

Following on from my last post about how I'd like to get into teaching:

One of the reasons I thought about getting into teaching was because I had experience teaching a class when I was 18. I had developed a technique in my art class that my tutors hadn't seen before and they asked me if I could teach the class below me how to do it. This meant that I needed to put a tutorial together and then teach the group step by step how to do it. I loved that I was able to be assertive and direct, whereas in everyday conversation I worry about upsetting people by telling them what to do.

My other experience of teaching is at work. Whenever we get new staff my managers always ask if I can train them. And I quite enjoyed this too.

I just love the idea of making lessons fun and enthusiastic so that the students can pick up on the enthusiasm for what they are learning. I know that I learn much better if I am enjoying the subject that is being taught and if the teacher makes it sound exciting.

Yeah I will add that teaching does really help you develop skills that you can use in other areas of life so that you grow to become a more well-rounded successful person. I'm just starting out and I'm already noticing that:
- I am more likely to express my thoughts and ideas without as much hesitation.
- I am more likely to "take charge" of decisions in the group or to give directions to others as to what they should do.
- I am more assertive.

The reason those skills come out because every day in class you are forced to do all of the above whether you are comfortable with it or not. When you have a class of 20 kids in front of you looking at you and expecting to direct them you have the choice to either overcome the fear of judgement or run away. If you really truly want to be successful, you won't run away.




Unfortunately, in the United States there's not much that is easy about becoming certified to teach. It depends on the state, but I know every year it is constantly becoming more difficult. Where I am, I've had to get 2 background checks, a TB test, take and pass 3 standardized tests (basic skills, content, and Assessment of Professional Teachers), complete a portfolio (which is rather extensive), complete a teacher work sample during student teaching (to prove students learned from me during student teaching), take an online course for English Language Learners, take an online course on using technology, plus all the education courses and courses that are just required for teachers but not education-oriented (such as american history and political science).
Which, to complete all of these things I have had to pay extra money than the average college student. Its a lot of busy work and its difficult to do, but I guess by doing so it weeds out those that are not dedicated.

I will also comment that the thing that helps me enjoy it more is the co-workers. The majority of people in education are SJs (hence why it is so structured), but the second largest group type is NFs. So being in a field where there are so many NFs helps me feel "at home" and having that many around even helps me to cope with structured SJs.
 

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I think as an INFJ its a given that you would like to work with people. If not, then I would doubt that you are truly an NF and would suggest you are NT. Any type of feeler is going to feel more fulfillment if working towards helping people is a component.

However, my comment should not be confused with "working with colleagues" per-say, because as introverts we find working independently on projects rather than in groups to be best. My point is simply that a feeler type is naturally going to want a job that helps benefit society in some way... if that job does not focus on helping society, then I would think the feeler would be lacking an inner passion and motivation for what they are doing in their lives in the aspect of a career. Having a career that influences that inner passion creates a sense of wholeness in that we are achieving our "vision" for what we would like to accomplish in the world.

If that all makes sense -- and this is purely in reference to the INFJ, because I can describe it best for an INFJ as I am one, though I am sure other NFs can relate to some extent. For example, an ENFJ I'm sure can relate to needing to do something to influence that inner passion, but they do not relate to the need for independence.
Hm.... there are some things on this post that I have been thinking about...

I don't think that feeler types are necessarily likely to feel more fulfillment if working with people or working towards helping people. I tried my hand at teaching... and counseling.... and it was awfully draining for me. My introvertedness level is VERY high - in the 80s, and sometimes I test out as 100%. Spending all that time with people... even when not directly talking/working with them took a huge toll on me. Overall, i think i spend most of my time helping or understanding family/friends's needs, so that is a job in itself for me. The ENFJs I have known also preferred administrative, organizing work, and less work dealing directly with people.

on the other hand, my dad (an introverted thinker) finds a lot of fulfillment in his career, which focuses on helping others and involves a lot of mentoring, counseling. A lot of it is independent, but still, he is very compassionate and finds fulfillment in this. ironically, he spends more of his time analyzing and theorizing things so I find it amusing that he finds so much fulfillment in helping others. i've been noticing this a lot with my introverted thinker friends that are older, too.

As an INFJ, I don't necessarily want a career that helps or benefit society in some way.. I've done a lot of volunteer work and working in jobs geared towards helping others, but i realize now that is not my passion or my fit. it is definitely a noble cause, but i am not cut out for it. the talking/being around others constantly is draining. and moreover, it was crushing for me at times because i empathized so much with those communities i was volunteering in and i started becoming really pessimistic about what good could come out of my work. (and i worked in really poor, below the poverty line communities, teaching kids and helping out with families). That said, teaching is still something i do-- i love coming up with teaching plans and new techniques, ideas, projects. I enjoy the occasional teaching here and there (mainly helping my friends who currently teach). my friends who teach have told me that i inspire them and they don't know why i don't pursue this as an occupation.... but hehe, once every so often is good for me now. no moreee!

So in response to the idea of INFJs working in careers that help/benefit people... I would have to disagree with that. I really think it is an individual thing, perhaps even correlated to enneagram type, but not necessarily correlated with type persay.

I agree with what you say about the inner passion though -- and the sense of wholeness.

For INFJs, I believe that something we do for our living has to relate to our ideals, our values, and our ideology. I think that more than other types, we are less likely to think "that's just my job, but this is my life." i think we are more prone to view our job as part of our life, a part of who we are, and a symbol of what we embrace. and we may be prone to spend more time trying to find "what fits" for us. Because our job is the tip of the iceberg that is exposed to all those around us, we tend to attach more significance to it. it has to somehow mesh with our values and our goals, whatever it is. For every individual person, i think this differs, but the main point is that the job we pursue has to be in line with our idealism -- so in a sense, our job is a pragmatic/realistic manifestation of our ideals. for some people this can be teaching, mentoring, creating art, creating stories, anything really. personally for me, it will be a highly individual, alone (no-people) type of career. I want to save all of the limited energy i have with my close friends and family (my I is so, so high), and spend most of my "job" time working on creating something -whether it is my art, music, or writing. Ironically, many people people have told me they see me as "successful" and "together", but they just don't know that i'm actually in the process of leaving current occupation to pursue my passion and a career that is in line with my idealism. might come as a shocking blow to some. :wink:

HTH! and good luck with everything. :proud:
 

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Hi!
First real job was doing websites, after that I did catering and then Nurses aid in an
elderly home.

Now I'm a nurses aid at a children's hospital, I like what I do, but hate the hierarchy
feeling that I get sometimes.
 

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I've had several menial type jobs in my younger years, and hated them. Well, mostly. I did sometimes enjoy working in food service at the University.

I've done a lot of teaching and mentoring as a volunteer over the years. That I love. I don't like teaching large groups so much, but small groups or one on one is perfect.

Obviously it wasn't a paid job, but I did homeschool my boys for a time. It was very rewarding and fulfilling, but got to be too much. I'm much better at teaching adults, they're not as likely to throw a tantrum!

I worked the census this year as a crew leader. It was the first supervisory job I've ever had, and it was actually much more enjoyable than I thought it would be. It was very stressful at times though. Working for the feds can be maddening. I found from that experience that I either need to be in charge, or I need to be left alone to do my work without anyone micromanaging.

I'm now poised to begin working part time for the USPS. It's just a means to an end. I will be going back to school as soon as possible in order to earn a certificate in nutritional therapy and one in massage therapy. I'm really excited about that, it's what I've wanted to do for a really long time. You know when you enjoy and are so good at something that you get "in the zone" and lose track of all time, feel no physical pain, etc. when you do it? That's how I am when I try to help someone feel better with my knowledge or my hands. It's not really work to me, it's part of who I am. I've done it for years for no pay just because I want to, and now I will make it my career.
 
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I will be going back to school as soon as possible in order to earn a certificate in nutritional therapy and one in massage therapy. I'm really excited about that, it's what I've wanted to do for a really long time. You know when you enjoy and are so good at something that you get "in the zone" and lose track of all time, feel no physical pain, etc. when you do it? That's how I am when I try to help someone feel better with my knowledge or my hands. It's not really work to me, it's part of who I am. I've done it for years for no pay just because I want to, and now I will make it my career.
I'd love to do that too. :happy:
 

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Thegirlcandance, what grade are you going to teach?
 

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Thegirlcandance, what grade are you going to teach?
Right now I have high school and 8th graders. I don't think I have the patience to deal with anything younger. At least at that age I can still talk to them at an adult level even if I have to simplify things.
 

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Hm.... there are some things on this post that I have been thinking about...

I don't think that feeler types are necessarily likely to feel more fulfillment if working with people or working towards helping people. I tried my hand at teaching... and counseling.... and it was awfully draining for me. My introvertedness level is VERY high - in the 80s, and sometimes I test out as 100%. Spending all that time with people... even when not directly talking/working with them took a huge toll on me. Overall, i think i spend most of my time helping or understanding family/friends's needs, so that is a job in itself for me. The ENFJs I have known also preferred administrative, organizing work, and less work dealing directly with people.

on the other hand, my dad (an introverted thinker) finds a lot of fulfillment in his career, which focuses on helping others and involves a lot of mentoring, counseling. A lot of it is independent, but still, he is very compassionate and finds fulfillment in this. ironically, he spends more of his time analyzing and theorizing things so I find it amusing that he finds so much fulfillment in helping others. i've been noticing this a lot with my introverted thinker friends that are older, too.

As an INFJ, I don't necessarily want a career that helps or benefit society in some way.. I've done a lot of volunteer work and working in jobs geared towards helping others, but i realize now that is not my passion or my fit. it is definitely a noble cause, but i am not cut out for it. the talking/being around others constantly is draining. and moreover, it was crushing for me at times because i empathized so much with those communities i was volunteering in and i started becoming really pessimistic about what good could come out of my work. (and i worked in really poor, below the poverty line communities, teaching kids and helping out with families). That said, teaching is still something i do-- i love coming up with teaching plans and new techniques, ideas, projects. I enjoy the occasional teaching here and there (mainly helping my friends who currently teach). my friends who teach have told me that i inspire them and they don't know why i don't pursue this as an occupation.... but hehe, once every so often is good for me now. no moreee!

So in response to the idea of INFJs working in careers that help/benefit people... I would have to disagree with that. I really think it is an individual thing, perhaps even correlated to enneagram type, but not necessarily correlated with type persay.

I agree with what you say about the inner passion though -- and the sense of wholeness.

For INFJs, I believe that something we do for our living has to relate to our ideals, our values, and our ideology. I think that more than other types, we are less likely to think "that's just my job, but this is my life." i think we are more prone to view our job as part of our life, a part of who we are, and a symbol of what we embrace. and we may be prone to spend more time trying to find "what fits" for us. Because our job is the tip of the iceberg that is exposed to all those around us, we tend to attach more significance to it. it has to somehow mesh with our values and our goals, whatever it is. For every individual person, i think this differs, but the main point is that the job we pursue has to be in line with our idealism -- so in a sense, our job is a pragmatic/realistic manifestation of our ideals. for some people this can be teaching, mentoring, creating art, creating stories, anything really. personally for me, it will be a highly individual, alone (no-people) type of career. I want to save all of the limited energy i have with my close friends and family (my I is so, so high), and spend most of my "job" time working on creating something -whether it is my art, music, or writing. Ironically, many people people have told me they see me as "successful" and "together", but they just don't know that i'm actually in the process of leaving current occupation to pursue my passion and a career that is in line with my idealism. might come as a shocking blow to some. :wink:

HTH! and good luck with everything. :proud:
I agree with this. I find that being around people all the time is very draining/demanding (I'm quite high on the introvert scale too) and in the past working full time and having a lot of people demanding things from me made me ill. I can cope quite well with part-time work so I think that If I do eventually get into teaching it will have to be part-time.

I find that not being able to take time out to reflect on things can make me very cranky. I also need the free time to be creative.
 
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