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What do you think of Steve Jobs?

  • Positive: He's fantastic, great, awesome, revolutionary

    Votes: 15 45.5%
  • Open ended: Don't know much about him but he seems like a cool guy, guess he's alright

    Votes: 5 15.2%
  • Indifference: Irrelevant to my interests, not enough insight to make a judgement

    Votes: 8 24.2%
  • Dislike: Not a fan, don't like him and/or his ways, hate

    Votes: 5 15.2%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fairly easy to understand (I hope). I'd assume a lot of ENTPs use Steve Jobs as a prime example to compare themselves to especially when describing Jung/MBTI etc to people in order to acquaint them better with the system.

So, what do you think about him? What do you like/dislike about him?

Likes:

-All the stereotypical "power ENTP" traits he possesses. Intuition, insight, vision, leadership, aggressiveness
-Preference in clothing XD
-His ability to reject 1000 things before something is "just right", he would compromise NOTHING when it came to certain aspects of development

Dislikes:

-Stifling of innovation by creating an authentic "Apple" experience only (lack of customization, no Flash support etc)
-Highly egotistical and full of himself publicly
 

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I've actually been thinking about that guy a lot recently. Trying to get a hold of his biography, so that I can make more reasoned judgements and conclusions during conversations like this. Based on my preliminary information about him, I'd say I like his commitment to quality, his perserverence, the way he figured his way through challenges, and his reality distortion field. And his face (I am a girl). I truly admire the fact that the guy fought pancreatic cancer for 8 years and didn't resign until just a couple of weeks before his own death. Do you know how sick you'd be at that point? That was frickin heroic, and it never seems to get any mention.

Dislike--he was certainly an abrasive tyrant, but I know I've seen those tendencies in myself so I won't judge. More annoying were his effete pretensions (sending food back multiple times in a restaurant, demanding that someone arrange the piano in his hotel room because it was at the "wrong angle"--two things I've heard about him). And he was seemingly very egotistical--someone probably needed to give the guy what-for.

Red flag, though--not everyone will agree that he was indeed an ENTP--he's notoriously hard to type. Based on what I know about him, though, I'd suspect he's the same thing that I am (check the signature). It took me 12 years to figure out what I was, and I still always test out as being an ISTP and see aspects of myself in fully 3/4 of the other MBTI descriptions. My cognitive functions are clearly ENTP, however.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Truly this man saw into the future, he wanted to cripple the industry with apps. Cripple + Application = Apple.

BRILLIANT!!!!

Or maybe he's just delusional and distorted everyone else's reality to compliment his way of thinking. That is not foreign to xNTPs.
 

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-Stifling of innovation by creating an authentic "Apple" experience only (lack of customization, no Flash support etc)
How did he stifle innovation? Not giving people tools to customize their experience doesn't stifle innovation. It just keeps people from being able to customize their experience. And getting rid of flash actually spurred on innovation. Flash is a buggy mess, and HTML5 with h.264 video streaming does the same thing as Flash in a far superior way. Flash is nearing obsolescence. Better companies are building new technologies to do the same thing faster, more secure, and more reliably. In fact, Apple was one of the leading pioneers to push HTML5 with WebKit, and that innovation has led to an open source project that has been adopted by Google, RIM, and Palm. While Palm is basically dead, we now have two desktop browsers and three mobile browsers that use the same HTML rendering engine, leading to a greater, more unified web. In fact, the smartphone market has seen huge leaps in innovation since the iPhone was released. Opening up the iPhone to developers has created a huge number of innovations in how we use our phones. Lack of customization and no Flash...the drawbacks to not including those are so insignificant and impermanent in comparison that they don't even bear worth mentioning.

I used to think Apple stifled innovation too, until I realized that Steve Jobs was behind 5 paradigm shifts in the consumer electronics industry, one in computer animation, and one in music. He fundamentally changed the focus of an industry a total of 7 times in his career. That's not stifling innovation.
 

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Well, I barely knew the guy. Never really thought of him at all while he was living.
But I was kinda sad when he died. He's the father of integrating contemporary American design.
As a designer, it felt kind of obligatory.
 

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I've actually been thinking about that guy a lot recently. Trying to get a hold of his biography, so that I can make more reasoned judgements and conclusions during conversations like this. Based on my preliminary information about him, I'd say I like his commitment to quality, his perserverence, the way he figured his way through challenges, and his reality distortion field. And his face (I am a girl). I truly admire the fact that the guy fought pancreatic cancer for 8 years and didn't resign until just a couple of weeks before his own death. Do you know how sick you'd be at that point? That was frickin heroic, and it never seems to get any mention.

Dislike--he was certainly an abrasive tyrant, but I know I've seen those tendencies in myself so I won't judge. More annoying were his effete pretensions (sending food back multiple times in a restaurant, demanding that someone arrange the piano in his hotel room because it was at the "wrong angle"--two things I've heard about him). And he was seemingly very egotistical--someone probably needed to give the guy what-for.

Red flag, though--not everyone will agree that he was indeed an ENTP--he's notoriously hard to type. Based on what I know about him, though, I'd suspect he's the same thing that I am (check the signature). It took me 12 years to figure out what I was, and I still always test out as being an ISTP and see aspects of myself in fully 3/4 of the other MBTI descriptions. My cognitive functions are clearly ENTP, however.
Read the book. It definitely explains why he did pretty much everything he did. It's what solidified in my mind that he's an ENTP.

Truly this man saw into the future, he wanted to cripple the industry with apps. Cripple + Application = Apple.

BRILLIANT!!!!

Or maybe he's just delusional and distorted everyone else's reality to compliment his way of thinking. That is not foreign to xNTPs.
Where are you getting that he wanted to cripple anything?
 

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How did he stifle innovation? Not giving people tools to customize their experience doesn't stifle innovation. It just keeps people from being able to customize their experience. And getting rid of flash actually spurred on innovation. Flash is a buggy mess, and HTML5 with h.264 video streaming does the same thing as Flash in a far superior way. Flash is nearing obsolescence. Better companies are building new technologies to do the same thing faster, more secure, and more reliably. In fact, Apple was one of the leading pioneers to push HTML5 with WebKit, and that innovation has led to an open source project that has been adopted by Google, RIM, and Palm. While Palm is basically dead, we now have two desktop browsers and three mobile browsers that use the same HTML rendering engine, leading to a greater, more unified web. In fact, the smartphone market has seen huge leaps in innovation since the iPhone was released. Opening up the iPhone to developers has created a huge number of innovations in how we use our phones. Lack of customization and no Flash...the drawbacks to not including those are so insignificant and impermanent in comparison that they don't even bear worth mentioning.

I used to think Apple stifled innovation too, until I realized that Steve Jobs was behind 5 paradigm shifts in the consumer electronics industry, one in computer animation, and one in music. He fundamentally changed the focus of an industry a total of 7 times in his career. That's not stifling innovation.
Gotta admit jailbreaking is funnier when you imagine Steve Jobs shaking his fists saying "You rotten kids!".
 

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Read the book. It definitely explains why he did pretty much everything he did. It's what solidified in my mind that he's an ENTP.



Where are you getting that he wanted to cripple anything?
Mind clarifying everything then?
The only fathomable reason I can conceive for ostracizing things that are "in the now" for a company that wants to be "in the now" is some decrepit form of hipsterness.
Or, yaknow, ego.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How did he stifle innovation? Not giving people tools to customize their experience doesn't stifle innovation. It just keeps people from being able to customize their experience. And getting rid of flash actually spurred on innovation. Flash is a buggy mess, and HTML5 with h.264 video streaming does the same thing as Flash in a far superior way. Flash is nearing obsolescence. Better companies are building new technologies to do the same thing faster, more secure, and more reliably. In fact, Apple was one of the leading pioneers to push HTML5 with WebKit, and that innovation has led to an open source project that has been adopted by Google, RIM, and Palm. While Palm is basically dead, we now have two desktop browsers and three mobile browsers that use the same HTML rendering engine, leading to a greater, more unified web. In fact, the smartphone market has seen huge leaps in innovation since the iPhone was released. Opening up the iPhone to developers has created a huge number of innovations in how we use our phones. Lack of customization and no Flash...the drawbacks to not including those are so insignificant and impermanent in comparison that they don't even bear worth mentioning.

I used to think Apple stifled innovation too, until I realized that Steve Jobs was behind 5 paradigm shifts in the consumer electronics industry, one in computer animation, and one in music. He fundamentally changed the focus of an industry a total of 7 times in his career. That's not stifling innovation.
Lmao!

Can you call iOS at all competitive to the Android platform? Or the seemingly limited and overpriced Mac OS one may come to love? The OSs come devoid of any additional features which make it easier to navigate an experience. One's own objective/subjective stance on "perfection" does not reflect the entire consumer market. Why can't I download files through their browser? Are you kidding me, where is the basis for expansion on something like that? If you are creating a back-end to changing the industry at least offer basic "primitive" functions like this and integrate them into your OS to deliver as much pleasure to your consumer as possible. His products were endlessly more polished and stabler than the competition, but inferior in function.

Also, take a look at some of the specifications in hardware behind MacBooks, or other PC solutions. Absolutely unjustifiable for the price. The man was adept at creating an emotional connection to his consumer, not an objective solution-based one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Oh I don't know, perhaps if you put together the most commonly used suffix to a website address plus a form that you sign to demonstrate disapproval to your government. What else is there an objective to "cripple"?

Riddle of the day. Answer to your question. End to a stupid argument.
 

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Lmao!

Can you call iOS at all competitive to the Android platform? Or the seemingly limited and overpriced Mac OS one may come to love? The OSs come devoid of any additional features which make it easier to navigate an experience. One's own objective/subjective stance on "perfection" does not reflect the entire consumer market.
See the interesting thing here is that it apparently does. For example, Android and the iPhone are basically neck-and-neck in the smartphone market. However, without the iPhone, Android would have looked like this:



I'm not saying that nobody else would have implemented smartphones in the way that Apple did, but it would have been an evolution over several years, and it wouldn't have flipped the market on its head. As far as Macs go, whether or not the price is worth it is up to the person buying it. However, as Apple's Mac division has seen a 20% growth year over year since 2007 and every PC manufacturer except I think Acer has been flat over the same period, one can say that yes Macs are competitive to PCs. And I have a Mac. It's not limited. And for what I got for it, it was worth the money too. I am also more satisfied with its hardware than any other computer I have owned.

While ones subjective stance on perfection does not always reflect the entire consumer market, the subjective stances at Apple are generating unprecedented growth and consecutive record-breaking quarters. You proved your own statement by using your own subjective stance as justification to your argument without taking the objective reality into account.

Why can't I download files through their browser? Are you kidding me, where is the basis for expansion on something like that? If you are creating a back-end to changing the industry at least offer basic "primitive" functions like this and integrate them into your OS to deliver as much pleasure to your consumer as possible. His products were endlessly more polished and stabler than the competition, but inferior in function.
I thought so too, until I used an Android device. Then I realized that organizing the files on my phone is an enormous pain that I would rather be taken care of for me. Now I have an iPhone, and while I can't download an MP3 file, I can stream it. I can however download a PDF or Word document. Quite honestly, I don't find myself wanting to download anything other than MP3 files. One drawback that saves me from an even bigger drawback. I can deal with that. Furthermore, removing something that is already clunky because it will be clunkier in favor of something that's going to be easier to use 90% of the time isn't stifling innovation. It is actually innovative in and of itself. I never hear anyone say that they miss the horrors of keeping their folder structure organized and remembering where everything is. It simply does not make sense to include that in a product that's supposed to make computing simpler. In certain situations I want to have a folder structure I can manipulate. My iPhone and iPad are not included in those situations.

Also, take a look at some of the specifications in hardware behind MacBooks, or other PC solutions. Absolutely unjustifiable for the price. The man was adept at creating an emotional connection to his consumer, not an objective solution-based one.
Again, 20% growth year over year for 5 years straight. However, if you will allow me to go back to innovation, you might remember that the unibody MacBook Pro was the first time a laptop was thin, light, powerful, and had excellent battery life. Then Apple worked with Intel directly to create an ultra low voltage version of the core 2 duo processors in order for the MacBook Air to have the same battery life. Now there's an entire segment of laptop PCs based on this concept of thin-and-light with good battery life.

Plus, the quality of Apple hardware creates a compelling objective reason to buy Apple. Even something as simple as a glass screen rather than glossy plastic makes a huge difference.
 

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Oh I don't know, perhaps if you put together the most commonly used suffix to a website address plus a form that you sign to demonstrate disapproval to your government. What else is there an objective to "cripple"?

Riddle of the day. Answer to your question. End to a stupid argument.
Or you could just not make ambiguous assertions. Here's what you said:

Truly this man saw into the future, he wanted to cripple the industry with apps. Cripple + Application = Apple.
Not only has the industry not been crippled by apps, it wasn't even Steve Jobs's idea to have a way for developers to write their own apps. He was actually reluctant to let other people write software for the iPhone. So do please explain where you got what you said from as it very apparently contradicts with reality rather than giving me a bullshit riddle that still does not answer anything. There are big gaps that aren't being filled in your argument.
 

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Well you said you knew why he was an insufferable prick, so I asked.
Oh. Well it would actually be easier for you to read the biography. The short story is that his obsession for purity was so incredible that even the slightest aesthetic imperfections had to be corrected. His mood often affected how he perceived things. He and his wife had thorough debates that lasted months over which washer and dryer to purchase for their home. The level of detail that he went into was out of passion rather than snobbiness. It's a theme that started at the beginning of his life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Simplifying a product comes from a glance of two things:

-The inherent problem, and a potential workaround
-A workaround that involves a unique watermark (spurred innovative features) OR just a conventional "already done" approach

Either way, when addressing a small "problem" such as file management, categorizing by genre and/or filetype is an easy solution that the manufacturer in fact does not have to directly solve (the logic of Apple in many cases), since there is software that is designed to do just that. This is where I'd say "There's an app for that", when we're talking about Android. The same logic would apply when arguing for the sake of Apple and adding additional features. Multiplied.

Cue multiple browsers, multiple utilities/tools applications, and the need for jailbreaking in order for a user to fully experience the potential of navigating through his/her shiny iOS without breaking a sweat. Well hey, I've soaked my towel (whether it be working to get my iOS personalized or by gawking at cute little Android).

Why do I have to double tap the main button, hold down an open application, then tap it again in a small red circle to close it when I could use a simple task manager instead? Is this a cult gang gesture of sorts? It makes no sense to make something so tedious and dumb like this.

*Insert infomercial* "Did you folks know that you can only throw 12 apps into a user-created folder on Apple's iOS before having to make another one with the same name, or attaching a number to it such as Game Folder and Game Folder 2 in order to expand your library? Lots of options here!"

Or am I just distracting from the fact that I am not pertinent as to my issue with an application crash error because Apple's lovely OS decides to shut it down abruptly without a post-message warning with an appropriate error code for me to research online, instead sucking the life out of a super-friendly Apple employee and wasting my time. Or perhaps the fact that many issues are not resolved on their website, but better yet, are, and hidden once their page loads after registering an Apple ID, viewing the page, and then...well, staring at a beautiful minimal theme which is strikingly handsome on the eyes and surely a sight for soreness.

This is a pattern. Apple does not directly address the concerns of their consumer in an open, objective manner. Their customer service INSTORE or when you actually contact someone is helpful (and excellent), but the heavy amount of reliance in repairing and/or inquiring about their products is cultlike and backhandedly respectful and disrespectful at the same time. Why can't I swap out my battery and add external data? Their products are generally marketed to a dumbed down consumer, which they also condescendingly treat in the same manner with their methods of support communication.

You seem to be quite intuitively focused on their growth figures rather than implying that most of Apple's consumer base is wrong to begin with. Merely calling someone a "Genius", or referring to the techs the consumer speaks to as "Geniuses" does not warrant for an advancement in computer technology, rather, the comfortable distribution of it and making a remarkable emotional connection with the logo and one's heart.

Have you considered that North America is not the only target market for these products? I mean, who knew... Asia ONLY populates half of the world -- where Android has 67% market share compared to Apple's measly ~8% in smartphones. Nevermind computers. This speaks volumes about the type of consumer we are targetting. This trend is also growing as people are switching to Android devices for their lower cost and seemingly endless array of options on multiple devices as RIM, Symbian and Palm are sinking while Windows Phone is a 3/10 entry level beauty pageant wannabe.

I get the deal with Apple. They release absolutely incredible retina displays, fantastic cameras, good internal hardware, and the best looking and cleanest experience with each product and suggestive "take my hand" methods of OS development. There is just too much left to be manipulated by the end-user though. Apple is in an industry in pleasing one's ego moreso than fulfilling and enriching their lives with an experience that gives them more and more control in their lives at the cost of options with the offering of a unified, but limited experience. Their backend is a success story that drives the market in a few places. Sometimes I wonder if the stifling of innovation is truly Jobs' own doing or a way to avert an antitrust breach.

They have been under a bit of legal scrutiny as of late, if we must.

PS. I can get an equally equipped laptop for literally half the price of a MacBook, with the most relevant feature too,... a glass screen...

...and dualboot into Mac OSX if I was mean enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Oh. Well it would actually be easier for you to read the biography. The short story is that his obsession for purity was so incredible that even the slightest aesthetic imperfections had to be corrected. His mood often affected how he perceived things. He and his wife had thorough debates that lasted months over which washer and dryer to purchase for their home. The level of detail that he went into was out of passion rather than snobbiness. It's a theme that started at the beginning of his life.
Dude, the biography is a postrationalization in an attempt to keep the aura of the man behind the company alive. Treating this human being like the next coming is particularly disheartening and a wretched look at the state of mind in Western society. He's the founder and was the CEO of a corporation that specialized in consumer products. Apple is literally being treated as a religion at this point, and is reflected by the limited frame of depth its consumer base makes up.

I downloaded it too the second it came out. I think it took me more time to snatch it than it took to publish it!
 

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Simplifying a product comes from a glance of two things:

-The inherent problem, and a potential workaround
-A workaround that involves a unique watermark (spurred innovative features) OR just a conventional "already done" approach
This is an assertion that is completely unfounded in evidence and reason.

Either way, when addressing a small "problem" such as file management, categorizing by genre and/or filetype is an easy solution that the manufacturer in fact does not have to directly solve (the logic of Apple in many cases), since there is software that is designed to do just that. This is where I'd say "There's an app for that", when we're talking about Android. The same logic would apply when arguing for the sake of Apple and adding additional features. Multiplied.
That's not what I mean. What I mean is that the typical interface of organizing and maintaining a folder structure is simply not an elegant process using a touchscreen interface. Any yahoo with an ounce of programming experience can manipulate the contents of a filesystem, but that doesn't mean the resulting app is going to be intuitive and easy to use. Every file manager I used on Android (I tried quite a few of them) have been clunky messes that weren't easy to use. I would have just connected the damn thing to my computer and organized everything that way if the USB drivers actually worked.

Cue multiple browsers, multiple utilities/tools applications, and the need for jailbreaking in order for a user to fully experience the potential of navigating through his/her shiny iOS without breaking a sweat. Well hey, I've soaked my towel (whether it be working to get my iOS personalized or by gawking at cute little Android).
This is strange because my iPhone is not jailbroken, and I am quite happy with my limited experience with no qualms about the fact that I can't do something that truly embodies what I want to do with my phone like organize files. I also use and am perfectly happy with Safari, and I have no third-party utilities/tools. I also don't break a sweat even though I am living under Steve's oppressive hindrances.

Why do I have to double tap the main button, hold down an open application, then tap it again in a small red circle to close it when I could use a simple task manager instead? Is this a cult gang gesture of sorts? It makes no sense to make something so tedious and dumb like this.
I actually find this to be quicker than using the typical Android task manager. Also, you don't need to close applications 99% of the time since the OS freezes inactive apps with a few exceptions. So does Android. Task managers aren't really needed except for extreme circumstances.

*Insert infomercial* "Did you folks know that you can only throw 12 apps into a user-created folder on Apple's iOS before having to make another one with the same name, or attaching a number to it such as Game Folder and Game Folder 2 in order to expand your library? Lots of options here!"
In order to show the app icons on the folder icon, something Android doesn't do.

Or am I just distracting from the fact that I am not pertinent as to my issue with an application crash error because Apple's lovely OS decides to shut it down abruptly without a post-message warning with an appropriate error code for me to research online, instead sucking the life out of a super-friendly Apple employee and wasting my time. Or perhaps the fact that many issues are not resolved on their website, but better yet, are, and hidden once their page loads after registering an Apple ID, viewing the page, and then...well, staring at a beautiful minimal theme which is strikingly handsome on the eyes and surely a sight for soreness.
Yeah Apple's online KB can be a pain. Luckily I just google what I am looking for, and the article for it is one of the first few hits. This is an improvement from Samsung whose KB had an FAQ with nothing else. They wouldn't even acknowledge the 64 bit driver issues. Apple could improve their KB, but it's far superior to many other companies'.

And when an app crashes, your phone sends the stacktrace to the developer, so they can figure out the problem, and you don't have to. The only time I had an app crash so much that I couldn't use it was because of a bug that no amount of researching or error codes could have gotten me anywhere.

This is a pattern. Apple does not directly address the concerns of their consumer in an open, objective manner. Their customer service INSTORE or when you actually contact someone is helpful (and excellent), but the heavy amount of reliance in repairing and/or inquiring about their products is cultlike and backhandedly respectful and disrespectful at the same time. Why can't I swap out my battery and add external data? Their products are generally marketed to a dumbed down consumer, which they also condescendingly treat in the same manner with their methods of support communication.
How is making the whole process of buying and owning a computer less intimidating in any way condescending. Yeah to me, someone who knows a lot about computers, I don't need them to spell everything out for me. It's annoying when I could just get down to business and have my question answered, but most people don't have the knowledge I do. It's not condescending. You can go in, get your issue solved, and leave. Most people don't want there to be more steps than that. They are happy to be reliant on that service for the same reason they are happy to have a farmer grow their vegetables: they don't know how to do it and they don't want to know how to do it.

Soldering the memory chips directly onto the board rather than having an expansion slot and not having a battery door save space. The more space you have, the larger the battery you can have. It's a trade-off, and I think it's worth it. With my Android phone, I was happy I had a battery door because I would have to swap it out halfway through the day. With my iPhone I go 2 days at a time without charging. By the time the battery needs replacing, I will have had a new phone.

You seem to be quite intuitively focused on their growth figures rather than implying that most of Apple's consumer base is wrong to begin with.
Hahaha this is one of the worst arguments I have ever seen. First, my focus on growth figures has nothing to do with my intuition. It has to do with the fact that you keep talking about consumers and markets using intuitive assertions that actual market data disagrees with. Second, what is the objective criteria to determine that Apple's consumer base is "wrong"? For someone who talks about how Apple lacks objective credibility for where they are in the market, you are lacking it to support your argument.

Merely calling someone a "Genius", or referring to the techs the consumer speaks to as "Geniuses" does not warrant for an advancement in computer technology, rather, the comfortable distribution of it and making a remarkable emotional connection with the logo and one's heart.
Agreed, but the fact that Apple has advanced computer technology warrants for an advancement in computer technology. Of course the Genius Bar is marketing, but it works. It also doesn't mean that Apple's products are bad. You're grasping at straws.

Have you considered that North America is not the only target market for these products? I mean, who knew... Asia ONLY populates half of the world -- where Android has 67% market share compared to Apple's measly ~8% in smartphones. Nevermind computers. This speaks volumes about the type of consumer we are targetting. This trend is also growing as people are switching to Android devices for their lower cost and seemingly endless array of options on multiple devices as RIM, Symbian and Palm are sinking while Windows Phone is a 3/10 entry level beauty pageant wannabe.
It could also be that Apple hasn't been in China that long, and Android is open source and therefore put on very cheap and bad devices. You also have to remember that China is the largest market in Asia, and Apple products are expensive compared to something that costs $50 on eBay. Furthermore, in this article, "iPhones are seeing strong demand from wealthier Chinese cities," meaning that most people simply can't afford them. You also forget to mention that the only developed region of Asia is East Asia, so not half of the world. The middle east to India are dominated by RIM and Symbian.

I get the deal with Apple. They release absolutely incredible retina displays, fantastic cameras, good internal hardware, and the best looking and cleanest experience with each product and suggestive "take my hand" methods of OS development. There is just too much left to be manipulated by the end-user though. Apple is in an industry in pleasing one's ego moreso than fulfilling and enriching their lives with an experience that gives them more and more control in their lives at the cost of options with the offering of a unified, but limited experience. Their backend is a success story that drives the market in a few places. Sometimes I wonder if the stifling of innovation is truly Jobs' own doing or a way to avert an antitrust breach.
I am telling you right now that I am one consumer among many who is happy that Apple has taken some features out of the equation for the sake of simplicity. I don't know a single person who owns an iPhone because it feeds their ego. They have an iPhone because they simply love it. Being able to get in, perform a simple task, and get out is extremely valuable. The iPhone facilitates that very well. So does Android. However, Android also facilitates other things, and those other things aren't done so well in my opinion.

They have been under a bit of legal scrutiny as of late, if we must.
As has Google in the past...and Microsoft.

PS. I can get an equally equipped laptop for literally half the price of a MacBook, with the most relevant feature too,... a glass screen...

...and dualboot into Mac OSX if I was mean enough.
I don't think you really understand that having a checklist that you can hit all of the points on doesn't make two things equal. This is why people who can afford it don't shop at Wal-Mart.
 

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Dude, the biography is a postrationalization in an attempt to keep the aura of the man behind the company alive. Treating this human being like the next coming is particularly disheartening and a wretched look at the state of mind in Western society. He's the founder and was the CEO of a corporation that specialized in consumer products. Apple is literally being treated as a religion at this point, and is reflected by the limited frame of depth its consumer base makes up.

I downloaded it too the second it came out. I think it took me more time to snatch it than it took to publish it!
I am not treating him like the next coming, but his intuition led to some of the most influential innovations of modern history. Who brought the computer to the mainstream? Apple. Who brought MP3 players to the mainstream? Apple. Who brought smartphones to the mainstream? Apple. Who brought tablets to the mainstream? Apple. And they didn't do it through just marketing. They did it by fundamentally rethinking what these devices should do. Let's also not forget Pixar. Bottom line, yeah he was founder and CEO or a consumer electronics company. It's also the most successful consumer electronics company to date that has so much money that they can't figure out what to do with it all.

You seem to attribute that to nothing more than his ability to sell the devices rather than the fact that he led the way with quantum leaps of innovation.
 
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