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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In a nutshell, how would you say understanding these profiling systems has benefitted you in your life?
 

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Here are some comments I've made in the past on this topic:

Yes I have found it very helpful. As a person with ASD, MBTI (and Jung) have helped me enormously by giving me a language to understand and differentiate parts of my own psyche and giving me a general idea about how others might perceive and judge the world around them.
Provided a glimpse into the diversity of human nature in a systematic way that I could understand. On many occasions it has been great for understanding differences in communication and conflict resolution. As someone with Asperger's Syndrome, I have found this system to be very helpful in understanding myself and others. I found it so helpful that I became a certified practitioner.
Personally, I find it helpful for a general understanding of where people might be coming from. For example, the woman walking 10 hours in NYC threads. One stance is about power, intimidation, and weakness. At first I want to reject and dismiss this point of view, but then I realize that this is a Feeling-based lens of the world. It is one way in which to determine what is agreeable or not. The opposing stance seems very much like a Thinking-based lens, objecting to what is being categorically associated with the word harassment. There's some introverted views in there too, where there is a belief that people should just leave other people alone in general on public streets. I just find different perspectives fascinating. In this case it is interesting because it feels like, even though on the surface they seem to be arguing about the same thing, but from an abstracted point of view, they are arguing two completely different things.
I like talking about MBTI. I can go on and on. I've gotten a few people interested in it that didn't know anything about it before. I've also changed people's views with the concepts. My ENFJ girlfriend used to judge introverted types as anti-social and weird. Now she understands that it's a normal personality type. I helped a psychologist friend see the differences too. It was especially important when dealing with autistic clients and their parents by setting the bar a little lower than expecting the norm to be extraverted social butterflies. I helped a couple of Thinking people realize and understand that their Feeling SO's are not just crazy and irrational people. The same for vice versa, that the Thinkers aren't just cold-hearted uncaring assholes. They both just have a different perspectives.
 

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After gaining an understanding on 8 cognitive functions, I understand myself and ppl better. I have more tolerance towards differences. It truly gives me a deeper sense of peace.
 

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I like MBTI because it provides a basic framework for people. It only explains so much, but it explains it well. And based on just a few cues, you're able to predict some other things that might be in play. It's fun and helpful, especially since I wasn't great at reading people before.
 

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Its a good starting point when getting to know someone new.

It teaches us that their are different ways of receiving the same information, which promotes tolerance and understanding.

Its a quick way to get an idea of what a person is like without prying.

Cognitive functions are interesting because it suggest there are patterns in which the brain grasp information. It speaks to subjectivity of experience and is food for thought when considering psychology of choice.

Why do you ask though?
 

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Interesting view. I don't know what to answer. Firstly, I started writting using "we" - writting from other people's experiences.
But, actually, my experience towards MBTI is only that matters. At first, I wanted to write that describing understanding of MBTI as pointless to any practical value is something like a harsh accusation, but maybe it isn't. It certainly is interesting, as you have said, but to those who read other people well without MBTI system, maybe it is pointless. But, some people maybe just need MBTI to understand others. First that come to my mind are INTJs, because I have a stereotype of them not understanding well emotions. For example.
 

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It explains the conflict between Fi and Fe people. I don't know if it has benefitted me at all. I am just aware of personality issues. I'm not sure anything I've learned can solve real world problems.
 

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A lot of things.

- Knowing my MBTI/JCF helped me figure out my enneagram type and understand how it is that I didn't see it before.

- Realizing why I have certain perceptions and neuroses--e.g., the Si-inferior knack for hypochondria and thinking the future will eternally suck / low Fe and my lack of social skills combined with overdrama. Why I've always been an absent-minded dipshit with no faith in my interpersonal abilities.

- Keeping a sense of proportion when dealing with said neuroses (dis-identification, zen-like, letting the thoughts go)

- Realizing my strengths (my mom wasn't lying when she said I was "persuasive". Creativity and eccentricity are strengths I can use to my advantage...not weaknesses to be derided)

- Interesting as hell to talk about and think about

- Understanding how the people I work with might be processing information; I can laugh when someone's annoying idiosyncracies are suddenly readily explainable, even loveable.

- Accepting the fact that I will always be a chaotic slob that can't get my shit together or finish anything, but also to see the value in being able to work chaos as I do. I know just where to put my efforts now.

- Helping me to explore my own brain and has increased self-awareness while decreasing self-delusion

It's given me a new respect for my own brain and an acceptance of my limitations. I'm letting a lot of hangups go I don't want to get into here. But damn. I'm really glad I got into it.
 

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IMO the good side of the coginitive functions is that you look at aspects of human personality and behavior that are not so self evident but fairly informative, like how we perceive information and how we judge. But the same thing is also the disadvantage: everything has to be explained by how people feel, think, sense, intuit and there are only two ways of perception and judgement of course. It is not easy to treat it as ONE of many possible systems known or unknown to explain differences in perception, decision making, behavior. I think these models are attractive for us because they meet the need to explain many things by few, catchy factors and this is why one should take from the functions what is interesting but always remain sceptical and don't overestimate the whole thing. The more so because of the whole ambiguity and disagreement about definitions and orders.
 

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- A lot of confusion

-A lot of fodder for self-analysis

- A few random ideas

-Something that vaguely resembles a social life

- An internet addiction
 

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I remember it now. I have never been in a relationship, but If I have, I would have surely been glad to know about my partner's patterns of thinking. That's where MBTI would be useful in practical terms for me.
 

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I knew I'd be asked that sooner or later. To me, whilst it is interesting stuff to read, I have a hard time understanding how it could be put to any practical use.
The MBTI gets a lot of flack for it's pseudoscience and general impracticality, which is a valid criticism. As far as I can tell though, it's a tool to promote recognition and tolerance of different personality preferences.
 

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MBTI was just a bit of fun.

The Jungian cognitive functions helped me to be more tolerant and understanding of people and less self-critical.
 

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This is MBTI 101, but it's amazing how many people IRL don't understand the difference between Introversion and shyness/anxiety. Learning this helped me put less pressure on myself to become an extrovert.

2nd most important thing is understanding my Fi. Having Fi can be annoying sometimes.

Therefore; might be extra important for INFPs/ISFPs to study up on this stuff?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
This is MBTI 101, but it's amazing how many people IRL don't understand the difference between Introversion and shyness/anxiety. Learning this helped me put less pressure on myself to become an extrovert.

2nd most important thing is understanding my Fi. Having Fi can be annoying sometimes.

Therefore; might be extra important for INFPs/ISFPs to study up on this stuff?
Looking at your Enneagram, I definitely would have thought more ENFP. Apparently they are prone to mistype?
 

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@agwood

7w6 describes me to a T at work. But when I'm at home, I'm all I. My Fi has gotten me in trouble with previous careers (just unwilling to do stuff that breaks values). I'm even theory-crafting about how to limit my time working with small groups, and replacing that with one on one time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
@agwood

7w6 describes me to a T at work. But when I'm at home, I'm all I. My Fi has gotten me in trouble with previous careers (just unwilling to do stuff that breaks values). I'm even theory-crafting about how to limit my time working with small groups, and replacing that with one on one time.
Well they do say ENFP's are the most 'introverted of the extroverts' whatever that means.
What were your previous careers if I may ask? Telemarketing? Defense Attorney? Hitman? ;)
 
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