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What is your understanding of what it means to be an INFP?

Break it down by letter - what does it mean to be Introverted vs. Extroverted? iNtuitive vs. Sensing? Feeling vs. Thinking? Perceiving vs. Judging? Is ambiversion a real thing? Do cultural factors skew the iNtuitive/Sensing scale when using MBTI theory internationally? Is it possible to just not distinctly be F/T or J/P?

What is your understanding of cognitive functions? What is Fi, Ne, Si, and Te? Do you take into account shadow functions? Do you see your order of functions as set or constantly changing? Have you been Fi-dominant since childhood? Did you develop/refine Ne a lot as a teen/young adult? Si in your 30s? Te in very late adulthood or at all?

Would you say that you were once another type, or that you could become another type? Is type set at birth, or do environmental factors and even conscious choices make a difference? Is it possible to "change types," or is it only possible to better understand your true type? Can everyone be sorted by MBTI typing?
 

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47 people have read this thread, and this is the sole reply. You don't have to answer every question directly... but come on, I know you have an opinion on this matter, and I want to hear it.
 

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it's difficult to say. and i just know someone will come in here and blab on bout an iNFP being Fi Ne Si. but i mean i guess this is me writing my own INFP desription, which will have a major positive Bias in it:crazy:.
An INFP has a wandering mind often pondering deeply upon thethings that most people don't even think about. INFPs are always trying to balance their social inability/anxiety with their desire to have real connections with people.Alot of INFPs have had bad experiences in life, and those bad experiences had a profound affect on them, distrustful of people and some having a fear of have real close realtionships, some never get past that but if they do they are a caring, honest and clever person, who make exellent friends. Humble to a fault most INFPs are never see the things they are valued for, and take a time to take nice things in, this is because of how much they appreciate this affection.
 

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What is your understanding of what it means to be an INFP?

Break it down by letter - what does it mean to be Introverted vs. Extroverted? iNtuitive vs. Sensing? Feeling vs. Thinking? Perceiving vs. Judging? Is ambiversion a real thing? Do cultural factors skew the iNtuitive/Sensing scale when using MBTI theory internationally? Is it possible to just not distinctly be F/T or J/P?

What is your understanding of cognitive functions? What is Fi, Ne, Si, and Te? Do you take into account shadow functions? Do you see your order of functions as set or constantly changing? Have you been Fi-dominant since childhood? Did you develop/refine Ne a lot as a teen/young adult? Si in your 30s? Te in very late adulthood or at all?

Would you say that you were once another type, or that you could become another type? Is type set at birth, or do environmental factors and even conscious choices make a difference? Is it possible to "change types," or is it only possible to better understand your true type? Can everyone be sorted by MBTI typing?
I don't know if I have enough brain power to answer this question tonight! :crazy: I'll give my extra simplified response.

I vs E - how we recharge - Introverts need time alone to recharge vs. being around other people.
iN vs S - We focus on future possibilities vs. the here and now.
F vs. T - We make decisions based on feelings, values and principles, follow our hearts vs. facts and logic.
J vs. P - We're more spontaneous and flexible vs. organized and mapped out.

I'm struggling to learn the cognitive functions...I really don't understand shadow functions. Not even going to tackle this one right now. It's next on my list to understand though. Especially the Thinking functions because I am very weak in that area...and need to develop them to grow.

I believe I've always been an INFP. I was a very dreamy, creative child lost in my fantasy land. I really don't know if I was born that way or if environmental factors made me that way... Honestly I don't understand what the big deal is. We are who we are, accept it, do the best we can with what we have and always strive to grow as people.

Just my $.02! :happy:

I'm curious to read others responses though.
 

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I don't know if I have enough brain power to answer this question tonight! :crazy: I'll give my extra simplified response.

I vs E - how we recharge - Introverts need time alone to recharge vs. being around other people.
iN vs S - We focus on future possibilities vs. the here and now.
F vs. T - We make decisions based on feelings, values and principles, follow our hearts vs. facts and logic.
J vs. P - We're more spontaneous and flexible vs. organized and mapped out.
this is how i usually break it down for those who aren't familiar with personality types
 

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MOTM Dec 2011
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Well, yes, I am going to blab about functions, but this is still my take on it, to be sure.

INFPs' dominant cognitive process is Fi (introverted feeling) which means they use a rational thought process based on the premise of value. Value meaning, what is important or good. Value is gauged against an inner model of the ideal; how it holds up to that ideal will deem something good or bad, or important or unimportant. The inner ideal is essentially an imagined perfection, which is why many IxFPs report thinking as much in picture as in words. Feeling is rational because it reasons, and the Fi process uses inner criteria to judge, which means the focus is on the inner world, leaving Fi-doms drained by the outer world of interaction.

So how does emotion come into play? Emotions are physiological signals, and these signals prove useful to Feeling. Fi-doms may spend much time reflecting on their emotions to derive meaning, noting nuances in emotion to pinpoint meaning, and allowing the emotions to impart significance. Emotions can shed light on the Fi-dom's inner ideals, but they do not comprise Feeling itself. Because emotions are so useful, Fi-dom's may seek to stir them, as they stimulate their mind. Hence, you have someone who is emotional, although not necessarily outwardly so. Since emotion aids Fi, the emotions can remain hidden along with feeling as part of the internal world, unless provoked through a value violation to show their face.

INFP's auxiliary or second cognitive process is Ne (extroverted intuition), which means that when they interact with the external world, they do so by seeing the intangible possibilities, meaning & patterns implied by external realities. Intuition is not rational, and so there is no reasoning to achieve these insights; others may achieve similar conclusions through reasoning, but Ne means the INFP is aware without any conscious effort to be. These intuitions can be as clear & obvious & immediate as an object right in front of their face; actually, they are moreso, which means the object right in front of their face can go almost unnoticed. This is how the big picture perspective is evident over a tendency to note details. The object is only paid attention to as a source of inspiration for ideas, not for it's own sake, so its often not examined closely enough to catch the details. The intuitions can be so far removed from the object itself as to further devalue the object by establishing no rational connection to it. The ideas seem to pop up out of "nowhere". Possibly upon Fi reasoning may some connection be made, but it's more likely to be connected to a Feeling than anything.

This makes INFPs future-focused, as they prefer to note what could be verses what actually is. You could say that Ne sees what could be, and Fi determines what should be. This combines to make a person who is very imaginative, idealistic, absent-minded, and focused on theory and concepts over existing reality. Such a person pursues change in an effort to establish some semblance of their ideal in reality; it doesn't have to be broken to need a revamping, according to INFPs. This can result in a perfectionist attitude that makes the INFP hesitate to act. They might prefer to wait, and see if better opportunities come along, to wait & see if a new idea may strike them that comes closer to the ideal.

Practicality and realism is downplayed. Experience is also downplayed in favor of the hypothetical. Exploring ideas is often preferred to exploring tangible experience, although since tangible experience can inspire ideas, there may be some effort to pursue it. The focus is still not on the experience so much as the ideas that can be derived indirectly from it. This is why reading may be just as fun, if not more, to an INFP as a roller-coaster. It can provide much more fodder for the imagination & it may also stir emotion, which results in much Fi introspection.

Introverted sensing, the third or tertiary process is mainly used to aid Ne and is colored by Fi. Having in mind the patterns of the past can aid Ne in essentially avoiding the obvious. After all, in order to pursue change, you have to know what has been. Si can be drenched in feeling-tones though. Memory is of what was felt to be significant, with less focus on facts and details, or they can be inconsistent.

Extroverted Thinking, the inferior process, mainly aids Fi & is turned to when Ne fails to see an adequate way to express Fi or to act in the external world. Te logic is used to support Feeling values, to establish their relevancy outside of the imagined ideal in the Fi-dom's head, & to organize thoughts in a manner comprehensible to others. It can also help the INFP judge Ne ideas as too removed from factual reality, as Fi may latch onto them if they are close to an inner ideal. Inferior Te use makes the INFP in danger of discarding facts that do not support Fi values, or blowing them out of proportion when they support a feeling. It can also show up negatively when an INFP deems something important, then this cause must be handled "perfectly" and then Te is trotted out to determine how to do things "correctly". This can result in being very critical and exacting, but often it is turned inward, and the INFP sees themselves as falling short moreso than other people or the situation.

/the long answer
 

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My knowledge of the functions and all is pretty weak, so I can't be too elaborate. Anyway, I'll use examples of myself to explain the basics.

Introversion - I need to be by myself relatively often. If not, I can get irritable and unpleasant. I'm also relatively socially awkward, and I feel weird talking to some people, sort of like some kind of self-consciousness. I can't for the life of me make small talk. I mean I can, but it makes me want to vomit.

Intuition - I love to follow my feelings (not sure if this is more in the feeling category, but anyway), and I tend to do things that I "feel" are going to turn out well, despite realistic probabilities telling me otherwise. I don't totally ignore them, and sometimes I let them get the better of me, but usually when I'm feeling something, I'll go with it.

Feeling - Not super strong on this one. I can feel people's pain, and I get sad when others are sad, but I can be a little distant and detached sometimes. I like to help people, and it's gratifying to do so, but sometimes it's draining. And it's just as gratifying, if not more so, when I figure out a super hard problem, or analyze this or that (more Thinker-like things... sometimes I wonder about being INTP).

Perceiving - This one kind of confuses me, but I contribute my procrastination and flexible tendencies to it. I'm not very rigid when it comes to most things, I kind of like to go with the flow. I dislike planning, and though I love deadlines because they actually ensure that I will get something done, I am not naturally attuned to them.
 
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