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video - :)

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*sigh* It's the story of my life.
You do not grow out of learning disabilities, as if they were clothing that became too small when you got taller.
 
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also... refusing to learn bullshit is not a disability, it's a sign of giftedness.:tongue:


BTW, this guy is mispronouncing his own name, why do they butcher French names in murica?
 

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also... refusing to learn bullshit is not a disability, it's a sign of giftedness.:tongue:


BTW, this guy is mispronouncing his own name, why do they butcher French names in murica?
No clue- I was born and raised in California and my grandparents grammar usage is way better than mine ( they studied English in France and Vietnam and can barely speak the language )



Anyhow- yeah my entp bff ( gifted) refused to pay attention in class bc work was too easy for her( this was in the first grade) her teacher thought something was wrong with her

I thought the video was interesting , especially the part where he mentioned
Look into my eyes when I'm yelling at you- why do we ask children to do such irrational things thinking it'll help them lol

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What is a Learning Disability?
A learning disability is a neurological disorder. In simple terms, a learning disability results from a difference in the way a person's brain is "wired." Children with learning disabilities are as smart or smarter than their peers. But they may have difficulty reading, writing, spelling, reasoning, recalling and/or organizing information if left to figure things out by themselves or if taught in conventional ways.
A learning disability can't be cured or fixed; it is a lifelong issue. With the right support and intervention, however, children with learning disabilities can succeed in school and go on to successful, often distinguished careers later in life.
Parents can help children with learning disabilities achieve such success by encouraging their strengths, knowing their weaknesses, understanding the educational system, working with professionals and learning about strategies for dealing with specific difficulties.
Not all great minds think alike
Did you know that Albert Einstein couldn't read until he was nine? Walt Disney, General George Patton, and Vice President Nelson Rockefeller had trouble reading all their lives. Whoopi Goldberg and Charles Schwab and many others have learning disabilities which haven't affected their ultimate success.
Facts about learning disabilities
Fifteen percent of the U.S. population, or one in seven Americans, has some type of learning disability, according to the National Institutes of Health.
Difficulty with basic reading and language skills are the most common learning disabilities. As many as 80% of students with learning disabilities have reading problems.
Learning disabilities often run in families.
Learning disabilities should not be confused with other disabilities such as autism, intellectual disability, deafness, blindness, and behavioral disorders. None of these conditions are learning disabilities. In addition, they should not be confused with lack of educational opportunities like frequent changes of schools or attendance problems. Also, children who are learning English do not necessarily have a learning disability.
Attention disorders, such as Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and learning disabilities often occur at the same time, but the two disorders are not the same.
Common learning disabilities
Dyslexia – a language-based disability in which a person has trouble understanding written words. It may also be referred to as reading disability or reading disorder.
Dyscalculia – a mathematical disability in which a person has a difficult time solving arithmetic problems and grasping math concepts.
Dysgraphia – a writing disability in which a person finds it hard to form letters or write within a defined space.
Auditory and Visual Processing Disorders – sensory disabilities in which a person has difficulty understanding language despite normal hearing and vision.
Nonverbal Learning Disabilities – a neurological disorder which originates in the right hemisphere of the brain, causing problems with visual-spatial, intuitive, organizational, evaluative and holistic processing functions.
What is a Learning Disability? | LD OnLine

I used to think I had a learning disability in grade 5, because that's what the child lawyers had told me(I had been getting very low grades in grade 5).

But I don't! Now and days adults and friends usually tend to be amazed and compliment my intellect a lot.
But my parents still act as though how well I do at school correlates towards my intelligence.:facepalm:

I used to get horrid grades at school(especially during the first and second terms), but it had less to do with me not being able to understand what they were teaching(though that was the case very occasionally, due to staff not knowing how to teach students properly), but instead had to do with me being bored of what try were teaching us.
I would usually spend my time either paying attention to what the older kids were learning(we had a lot of split classes at our school), daydreaming, doodling, or just doing my own thing. That's how boring class was.

By the time I was in grade 7 my grades began improving dramatically because in my 7/8 split class(when I switched to Catholic school, I learned that all Catholic elementary schools go up to grade 8), the teacher made what we learned both fun and interesting(probably because she was also the schools drama head). And she would allow us to learn the things the older kids were learning too.

By grade 8 I was already getting a straight A average(in all academic subjects), and right now I'm mainly getting A's.
But boy is highschool boring! :1892:
 
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What is a Learning Disability? | LD OnLine

I used to think I had a learning disability in grade 5, because that's what the child lawyers had told me(I had been getting very low grades in grade 5).

But I don't! Now and days adults and friends usually tend to be amazed and compliment my intellect a lot.
But my parents still act as though how well I do at school correlates towards my intelligence.:facepalm:

I used to get horrid grades at school(especially during the first and second terms), but it had less to do with me not being able to understand what they were teaching(though that was the case very occasionally, due to staff not knowing how to teach students properly), but instead had to do with me being bored of what try were teaching us.
I would usually spend my time either paying attention to what the older kids were learning(we had a lot of split classes at our school), daydreaming, doodling, or just doing my own thing. That's how boring class was.

By the time I was in grade 7 my grades began improving dramatically because in my 7/8 split class(when I switched to Catholic school, I learned that all Catholic elementary schools go up to grade 8), the teacher made what we learned both fun and interesting(probably because she was also the schools drama head). And she would allow us to learn the things the older kids were learning too.

By grade 8 I was already getting a straight A average(in all academic subjects), and right now I'm mainly getting A's.
But boy is highschool boring! :1892:
Thanks- I work with children and one of the girls that I work with has a learning disability . I was researching about it last night and thought this clip was very eye opening not only for me as an educator but it help me communicate better with other people as well

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I have never watched a video that long online. I rarely even watch 3 minute videos. Thanks for sharing this one. For anyone considering not watching because of length - just hop to any time spot and listen for a bit. It's in little sections based on exercises. You'll get the general idea from any of them.

My husband has an LD in math and it has been infuriating to hear how he was treated in school, especially because he is such a knowledge magnet (and he's a teacher now). I think he is generally "smarter" than me - quicker processor in most areas, better with logic, better memory, better knowledge base, better vocabulary, more adaptable, more emotionally controlled - and yet I was an honors student through school while he was often placed in remedial and emotional or behavior-problem groups, despite not having struggles in those areas at all. He persisted and succeeded academically thanks to his own determination and willpower despite being called inattentive and lazy even when registered with the disability office in college.
:)angry:!!!)

I'm so glad more info on LDs is entering education but I think there is still a long way to go! Many opportunities in learning more about LDs themselves - why they happen, how they work, what can mitigate them - in addition to how to work with kids - and adults! - who experience them.
 

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I will have to bookmark the video for viewing later as it is quite long.
First things first, have you watched Taare Zameen Par (Like Stars on Earth / Every Child is Special)? Great movie, you have to see it if you haven't yet. The boy there has dyslexia.

Too bad the Ball-Stick-Bird website doesn't seem to exist anymore. There's this psychologist who created a reading system that didn't rely on phonics. Students that were considered dyslexic and/or retarded were able to read an understand what they read. Here's one of her articles - https://www.context.org/iclib/ic27/fuller/

People generally think of me as intelligent, even now after I've failed college so many times. The flip side could also be bad, thinking of yourself as gifted, expectations too high... It still baffles me as to why we still use the traditional methods of measuring IQ and teaching/ testing in school. We learn about Multiple Intelligences in Psych1, it's no secret that there are more than 3-4 types of intelligence and yet the school systems focus on a few of these, and even teachers forget to incorporate different teaching methods (even though they learned those too). Crazy.

btw I am loving the article I just linked. You should read it.
 

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It still baffles me as to why we still use the traditional methods of measuring IQ and teaching/ testing in school.
Looking up what IQ tests are actually used for and the research supporting that usage might help.

it's no secret that there are more than 3-4 types of intelligence
You say this as if it's a fact. It isn't. Multiple intelligences is just a model that in no way compares to traditional IQ tests. It hasn't been researched as much, it hasn't even been formulated into any kind of assessment that can replace traditional IQ tests! So there isn't currently any standardized way to apply it.
 

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Looking up what IQ tests are actually used for and the research supporting that usage might help.


You say this as if it's a fact. It isn't. Multiple intelligences is just a model that in no way compares to traditional IQ tests. It hasn't been researched as much, it hasn't even been formulated into any kind of assessment that can replace traditional IQ tests! So there isn't currently any standardized way to apply it.
Well, do you think there are 4 or less types of intelligence regardless of model?

Traditional IQ tests suck. I regret getting 99 in such a one in 3rd grade. That created a lot of unfair expectations on me. Worse, it fed my young ego.

EDIT. Watching the video now.

Seeing adults experience anxiety and processing delay is kind of a revenge scenario for me. In some ways, I can relate to it. That was my experience in most of high school and some college classes. I've also been told to look at people when they speak - very difficult as I'm concentrating on the sound. This is a common problem for people with Asperger's Syndrome / ASD.

Sarcasm can be really damaging to a child, one of the reasons why I hate it. We forget that it could still affect us as adults. I see it often at work, my otherwise capable colleague is the butt of jokes, sarcasm and negative feedback. She had been at the job for two years, by now it's become a self-fulfilling prophecy. One of our bosses is particularly mean and can now accuse my coworker up front of things that aren't true. And she's learned to accept such blatant lies.

Same with rhetorical questions. Come on, that's not way to treat a kid (or a subordinate).

I used to be quite the confident student, a risk taker with a strong personality. (Before I turned 12 it was almost impossible to make me cry!) Now I hardly take risks at all. I have failed so many times, I get blamed each time, why would I risk that again?

I may have some sort of learning disability especially when it comes to spatial / kinesthetic learning. Make me do something mechanical (build/ tinker/ use) and I'm gonna stare at you like crazy. Furthermore I hardly learn anything on my own. I was only able to learn whatever I had because of especially competent teachers. I've had both terrible teachers (most of high school) and brilliant ones (grade school math and English, music instructors).

All of this is on top of my more obvious social skills issues.
 

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So many things people take for granted as learners... I'm also thinking about the effect of anxiety or trauma on non-learning disabled people. That would affect processing time, perception and risk taking.
 

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EDIT. Watching the video now.

Seeing adults experience anxiety and processing delay is kind of a revenge scenario for me. In some ways, I can relate to it. That was my experience in most of high school and some college classes. I've also been told to look at people when they speak - very difficult as I'm concentrating on the sound. This is a common problem for people with Asperger's Syndrome / ASD.

Sarcasm can be really damaging to a child, one of the reasons why I hate it. We forget that it could still affect us as adults. I see it often at work, my otherwise capable colleague is the butt of jokes, sarcasm and negative feedback. She had been at the job for two years, by now it's become a self-fulfilling prophecy. One of our bosses is particularly mean and can now accuse my coworker up front of things that aren't true. And she's learned to accept such blatant lies.

Same with rhetorical questions. Come on, that's not way to treat a kid (or a subordinate).

I used to be quite the confident student, a risk taker with a strong personality. (Before I turned 12 it was almost impossible to make me cry!) Now I hardly take risks at all. I have failed so many times, I get blamed each time, why would I risk that again?

I may have some sort of learning disability especially when it comes to spatial / kinesthetic learning. Make me do something mechanical (build/ tinker/ use) and I'm gonna stare at you like crazy. Furthermore I hardly learn anything on my own. I was only able to learn whatever I had because of especially competent teachers. I've had both terrible teachers (most of high school) and brilliant ones (grade school math and English, music instructors).

All of this is on top of my more obvious social skills issues.
The video made me rethink about how I should talk to others( my own children, friends etc)
He made a really good point ' how do you look harder or try harder when you dont know the answer.
Or why scream at somebody and tell them to look at you in the eye- as an adult it's uncomfortable as well , I don't want to look somebody in the eyes if they will criticize me and point out my flaws to me.

And I like his example of asking a student a question that he knows for a fact that the student know the answer to - to engaged them in learning more.

I'm sorry that you had experience with bad teachers, and that they made you lose self esteem . It's a teacher duty to make a child want to learn not be fearful of it.
Likewise- parents shouldn't push their child but learn to shadow or cater to the kids interest -

☆ sarcasm and calling out a student does damage a child ( any child and I'll go as far as saying it'll hurt adults as well )
I have piano anxiety bc the teacher used a metal stick to strike at my fingers each time I'm wrong and he kept on reminding me that I must be a bad student at school bc if I suck at piano then I do worst in school - after 2 years my mom decided to sit and watch me play and found out that he strikes my fingers with a stick- she marched up to him- picked me up ( I had lesson from ages 5-7) and brought me out to buy toys and promises me a new piano teacher - but by then I'm traumatize of the piano ( still am).
--------
Thanks for answering the post, I feel like I learn a bit more about you through this:)

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The video made me rethink about how I should talk to others( my own children, friends etc)
He made a really good point ' how do you look harder or try harder when you dont know the answer.
Or why scream at somebody and tell them to look at you in the eye- as an adult it's uncomfortable as well , I don't want to look somebody in the eyes if they will criticize me and point out my flaws to me.

And I like his example of asking a student a question that he knows for a fact that the student know the answer to - to engaged them in learning more.

I'm sorry that you had experience with bad teachers, and that they made you lose self esteem . It's a teacher duty to make a child want to learn not be fearful of it.
Likewise- parents shouldn't push their child but learn to shadow or cater to the kids interest -

☆ sarcasm and calling out a student does damage a child ( any child and I'll go as far as saying it'll hurt adults as well )
I have piano anxiety bc the teacher used a metal stick to strike at my fingers each time I'm wrong and he kept on reminding me that I must be a bad student at school bc if I suck at piano then I do worst in school - after 2 years my mom decided to sit and watch me play and found out that he strikes my fingers with a stick- she marched up to him- picked me up ( I had lesson from ages 5-7) and brought me out to buy toys and promises me a new piano teacher - but by then I'm traumatize of the piano ( still am).
Yeah that was a very good workshop and video. The teacher handled it expertly. You find really cool stuff, Miss Ai!

If you have piano anxiety, what about music? Did you learn to sing or play another instrument? Music is wonderful, if you can't play the piano I hope you find something else.
 

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Yeah that was a very good workshop and video. The teacher handled it expertly. You find really cool stuff, Miss Ai!

If you have piano anxiety, what about music? Did you learn to sing or play another instrument? Music is wonderful, if you can't play the piano I hope you find something else.
I still play the piano - it's the lesson that I'm terrified of, so nowadays I self teach myself songs ( easy ones ) and play them for leisure.
I've never had singing lessons but I love kareoking with friends ( I'm not a great singer either ). I self taught myself how to play the guitar back in college - agreed music is great .

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I started out with dysgraphia and dyspraxia.

Dysgraphia killed my passion for maths because writing was always slow and physically painful for me and maths is all about writing writing writing writing.

Dyspraxia made very poor P.E. student. P.E. teachers usually care more about effort than actual skill, though.



Ever since being targeted by two vicious abusers in last two classes of primary school, my school attendance and performance took a nosedive and never recovered due to insomnia, IBS, school phobia and worsened ability to concentrate and study.


In 2003 when I was diagnosed by psychiatrist, she wrote:

Psychological examination indicates above average intellectual level, disharmonious development.

Especially significant deficits were detected in language abilities and general informations (which can be connected to frequent absences at school) and graphomotorical skills of the patient. Psychological examination has shown significant deficits in durability of memory traces in fresh visual memory of patient, ability to focus at will and eye-motion coordination.

The deficits indicate presence of organic damage of the central nervous system of the patient.

An incorrectly formed, emotionally dis-regulated personality, incorrect internalisation of social norms [that probably refers to poor school attendance and performance, which was due to symptoms. Jesus Christ, why do psychologists have to be so fucking dumb?] and very high level of generalized anxiety, manifested in numerous somatic symptoms significantly limiting the functioning of the patient (everyday diarrhoea (which recently turned out to be caused by haemorrhoids), shaking body) was detected.

Due to the above anxiety disorders the patient could the patient couldn’t continue studying in day mode (long absences on somatic anxiety disorders background caused failing next classes).

Currently the patient is continuing studying in weekend high school.

Conclusions:

Due to emotional state the patient isn’t qualified to take up work.

After the neo-nazi attacks of 2005 my memory and ability to focus got even worse.


I lost my career because all these crimes committed against me by the society.


How it affected my grades:

Toxic Primary School:
In my 5th class my behaviour grade was 4.0 and the average was 4.3/6.

In 6th class the atmosphere in class got much more toxic. I started having trouble going to school.

In 6th class my behaviour grade dropped to 2.0 and the average dropped to 3.6.

In my 7th class, my average dropped to 3.2.

During the last two years of primary school, I was targeted by two psychological abusers. One of them was an ex-friend that I accidentally offended, second was some year older student that I didn’t know before he started harassing me. The first abuser was also sexually abusing girls and got away with it despite that the school direction knew about everything.

During these two last years, I started suffering from insomnia, attacks of rage, intrusive thoughts and feelings,depression, lost my ability to have normal attendance to school, my grades have drastically worsened, I felt completely alienated. Finally I got IBS and was unable to go to school at all.

That was the second damage: I ended primary school traumatized, with very bad grades, health problems and no chance to get into a decent high school. I had an average of 2.7/6 and behaviour grade of 2.0 which made me a persona non-grata in good high schools.

2.0 behaviour grate is given automatically over certain amount of absences.

Toxic Private High School
1st class
2.0/6 and 2.0 from behaviour.

Normal High School
2nd class
Failed

2nd class
2.8 and 2.0 from behaviour, passed only due to individual teaching.

3rd class
1.9 and 2.0 from behaviour. Got kicked out of school. Had to go to a weekend school.

Weekend High School
During the 5th semester I had average of 2.3.

During the 6th semester I had average of 2.4.

During year 4, on Semester VII I got average of 3.0. I had to repeat it, first, though.

I barely finished high school with score average grades of 3.0 (again due to English and one bullshit subject that practically didn’t require studying called Knowledge About Society).

I have spent 6,5 years struggling to get through high school.

I passed maturity exam with 2 and 2 from Polish, 4 and 5 from English and 5 from Knowledge About Society. So, I had no chance to get to a free college. Or ability to finish college at all while we’re at it.
More detailed and extensive account is in my blog.
 

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I started out with dysgraphia and dyspraxia.

Dysgraphia killed my passion for maths because writing was always slow and physically painful for me and maths is all about writing writing writing writing.

Dyspraxia made very poor P.E. student. P.E. teachers usually care more about effort than actual skill, though.

Ever since being targeted by two vicious abusers in last two classes of primary school, my school attendance and performance took a nosedive and never recovered due to insomnia, IBS, school phobia and worsened ability to concentrate and study.

After the neo-nazi attacks of 2005 my memory and ability to focus got even worse.

I lost my career because all these crimes committed against me by the society.
Thank you for your input. I was thinking about the effect of trauma on learning earlier. This is all good data.

Please do not worry too much about career and money. I have a normal day job, but I think this kind of work (filing clerk) will be too boring for a creative person like you. I have dumbed myself down considerably to fit in. I am not half as intelligent as I was in grade school and high school. I took a job in government because it was the only way I could find a stable job that did not involve meeting lots of people (as in food service and call centers). I quit reading, writing, music and art so I could have this job, that pays less than minimum and has no benefits.

Before I got my job, I had been in college off and on for 12 years. I have been kicked out of college thrice, for a grand total of five times dropping out due to depression and difficulty socializing. People I thought were my friends stabbed me in the back. In my last school, my mom and I went full disclosure about my condition hoping to get additional help, and that same diagnosis was used against me. I was kicked out in the middle of the semester in spite of having good grades, being part of an organization, and fully paid in tuition. I got a refund only for the latter half of the semester and was refused a certificate of good moral character, making it impossible for me to transfer schools and finish a degree. Unknown to us, I already had a case filed against me before enrollment but they had let me enroll anyway.

Oh well. Being normal is overrated anyhow.
 
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