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I think being a film director is one of the best jobs for an INFP; why? Well:

- Sometimes you can write your own material (if you're a indie filmmaker)
- Interpret intentions of characters and deeper feelings/emotions to the actors, also within the lighting, framing, etc.
- You're basically pretending all day
- You get to overlook different aspects of the image, sound, music, lighting, acting, and judge it to the context of the script.

However, there are some downsides:

- Can be noisy
- Requires you to talk, however it doesn't mean only extroverts strive here (think Ang Lee, Tim Burton, Clint Eastwood, etc.)
- Pressure to meet deadline
- Working unusual hours

Honestly, I think being a writer is thee ultimate INFP career. It suits us perfectly. I want to become a filmmaker. But, like most ideal INFP careers, it will be very VERY tough.
 

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I think being a film director is one of the best jobs for an INFP; why? Well:

- Sometimes you can write your own material (if you're a indie filmmaker)
- Interpret intentions of characters and deeper feelings/emotions to the actors, also within the lighting, framing, etc.
- You're basically pretending all day
- You get to overlook different aspects of the image, sound, music, lighting, acting, and judge it to the context of the script.

However, there are some downsides:

- Can be noisy
- Requires you to talk, however it doesn't mean only extroverts strive here (think Ang Lee, Tim Burton, Clint Eastwood, etc.)
- Pressure to meet deadline
- Working unusual hours

Honestly, I think being a writer is thee ultimate INFP career. It suits us perfectly. I want to become a filmmaker. But, like most ideal INFP careers, it will be very VERY tough.
Making my own style of short films is the next evolution for me. I have come to realize that if I want to get to the depth I need to, I will need to focus on writing. I have been eyeing some local writing classes and will take one sometime soon.

As for right now, I make my living shooting freelance small business advertising videos...and it is actually not that bad. For instance. I just got home filming a video for an optometrist and had a blast. The office was full of fun ladies with a cool, laid back doctor. Not sure of MBTI's, but seems like a lot of positive Fe going on. Most of the small business owners I deal with are a pleasure to work with. Once they know I am on their side and they know what I am doing, I can be goofy and have some fun.

The only part that is super boring is editing. Too procedural for me. In the future I would love to have an editor take over.

Not my ultimate career, but certainly in alignment with what I want to do. My of business marketing advice revolves around WHO do you want to help. That is something I have been thinking about. I want some aspect of caring, or social cause element in the videos I make. If I figure out a way to make videos for people I really, really care about or causes I really care about then it would be an even better fit.

Ultimately, I think for me to maximize fulfillment and expression I will need to write my own films and make them. As redhotpengy said, writing is key.
 

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I think being a film director is one of the best jobs for an INFP; why? Well:

- Sometimes you can write your own material (if you're a indie filmmaker)
- Interpret intentions of characters and deeper feelings/emotions to the actors, also within the lighting, framing, etc.
- You're basically pretending all day
- You get to overlook different aspects of the image, sound, music, lighting, acting, and judge it to the context of the script.

However, there are some downsides:

- Can be noisy
- Requires you to talk, however it doesn't mean only extroverts strive here (think Ang Lee, Tim Burton, Clint Eastwood, etc.)
- Pressure to meet deadline
- Working unusual hours

Honestly, I think being a writer is thee ultimate INFP career. It suits us perfectly. I want to become a filmmaker. But, like most ideal INFP careers, it will be very VERY tough.
Redhotpengy,

You sent me a PM but I can't reply because I am too new here. Not enough posts.

The main advice I've heard over and over is that it is extremely difficult to make a living shooting narratives...BUT it is possible to make a living shooting corporate / business films. I freelance for a few companies and all my work revolves around helping small to medium businesses promote themselves. For instance, last week was intense. I filmed seven businesses, which is more than normal. I have to create a one minute video of each business.

It's not bad though. I edit from home, so I have lots of time freedom. No complaints.

I don't actually know anyone that makes a living shooting only narratives (fiction). That is a super tough field. Again, the general advice out there is to shoot for businesses and work your passion projects on the side. Sucks, but we idealists need to be grounded some times.

I did an internship for a video production facility. When I was about to leave the owner sat me down to show me "the reality." He said that he posted a job offer for a production assistant the day before. He turned his monitor around to show me over 100 or so replies! Basically, because this field is so much fun, it attracts tons of competition. People are willing to work for little money because they want to do what they love.

The good news that I see is that they are a ton of businesses out there, and they need to share their message. Video is a great way to do that. I actually do enjoy sitting down with business owners. They are a smart, passionate bunch.

Have you heard of Philip Bloom? He has an excellent blog. He even posted about making a living at this stuff. It's worth a look. Can't post links, but google "philip bloom how do I get into this filming lark and make money from it?"

He has excellent advice.

What gear do you have? What are you shooting with? Are you going the film school route?
 

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I'm thinking about joining the police academy and going into law enforcement this coming January, not necessarily my ideal choice and I can't imagine people think its an INFP job, but I don't really have a fetish for justice like I imagine people excpect authority figures to have. Even if I have to bust into a house to settle a domestic abuse thing or something, instead of like on cops where you just talk to everyone dictatorially like "sir I need you to sit down" etc and creating an even more tense environment, I would imagine going in and reassuring the people inside and being like "hey man I realize us being here is only another source of stress, everyone has bad days, lets just talk about this, and see what we can do.." etc. I don't want to turn into an asshole, or even disconnect from people in order to do my job.

I don't know what police culture is like but I'm determined to be a compassionate cop, if I do end up going that way.
 

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Freelance artist I think would fit INFP people the most. You can work as much hours as you want and where you want, but I believe it'd be a little difficult, since it requires dealing with clients personally.
As for me, I want to become a childrens book illustrator or a jeweller. These two things involve creating beauty with meaning and joy for other people.
 

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Redhotpengy,

You sent me a PM but I can't reply because I am too new here. Not enough posts.

The main advice I've heard over and over is that it is extremely difficult to make a living shooting narratives...BUT it is possible to make a living shooting corporate / business films. I freelance for a few companies and all my work revolves around helping small to medium businesses promote themselves. For instance, last week was intense. I filmed seven businesses, which is more than normal. I have to create a one minute video of each business.

It's not bad though. I edit from home, so I have lots of time freedom. No complaints.

I don't actually know anyone that makes a living shooting only narratives (fiction). That is a super tough field. Again, the general advice out there is to shoot for businesses and work your passion projects on the side. Sucks, but we idealists need to be grounded some times.

I did an internship for a video production facility. When I was about to leave the owner sat me down to show me "the reality." He said that he posted a job offer for a production assistant the day before. He turned his monitor around to show me over 100 or so replies! Basically, because this field is so much fun, it attracts tons of competition. People are willing to work for little money because they want to do what they love.

The good news that I see is that they are a ton of businesses out there, and they need to share their message. Video is a great way to do that. I actually do enjoy sitting down with business owners. They are a smart, passionate bunch.

Have you heard of Philip Bloom? He has an excellent blog. He even posted about making a living at this stuff. It's worth a look. Can't post links, but google "philip bloom how do I get into this filming lark and make money from it?"

He has excellent advice.

What gear do you have? What are you shooting with? Are you going the film school route?
Hey Agent of Change,

Thanks for the awesome message. Very informative, thoughtful and realistically written. As much as I love creating fiction, as long as there is a way to make videos for a living, I'm happy. Although, I'll always have a special place for narratives. So when you said work your passion projects on the side, I totally understand you. Editing from home seen great, you would have a ton of free time which I'd like because I don't like being tied down. May I ask though, how do you charge your clients?

I'm not surprised at the 100 replies! It's ridiculous.

Yes, I am hoping to do a college program in media arts (I'm 17 y.o., btw), which specialises in all aspects of filmmaking, it is more narrative directed by the looks of it. Do you recommend going? Did you go?

No, I haven't. But, I'll take a look!

Right now, I have a Canon 60D with an 15-85mm IS AF lens. I also have my Dad's old 50mm & 28mm primes which I use the most. They're very soft, which I love. How about you?

Thanks again!
 

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I think INFPs can excel everywhere but rarely get satisfied anywhere. This is because Fi and Ne are not job-specific cognitive traits.

Fi is a radar for harmony and disharmony. No job description says "This person's job is to keep harmony within our company." Jobs are task-focused; whether or not harmony is kept is irrelevant..
That is not true. Managers are supposed to be keeping stability and harmony, and that means, knowing other people's personalities and getting the best out of a group of people, and ensuring that the dynamic of a group of people is sustainable, and so forth. Giving their subordinates what they want, and ensuring that they get the best benefit etc.

We are also good at being human resources too... Training people. Making the best of how to turn an employee around and building up an empire.


I have to job hunt again, but I have thought about these kidn of roles, and it sounds more and more appealing. I have seen some INFPs. or NFs.. going into teaching, and actually then working for the UN. I still want to try and work for the UN, even though I feel so broken right now. Demotivated and spiritually zapped. Each day, I get criticised for what I have learnt for the past 10 years.... That is ridiculous.
 

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Just wanted to give my inputs too. I should look back into my own notes in career development. My first inspiration, was the book "What colour is your parachute". Then I also got the book by John Lees. "How to get a job you love". :)

John Lees Associates - Career Transition and Development - This is a good set of links btw.

I remember thinking that these books and what they described was so far fetched and did not let me connect emotionally, but after working for a while, and you kind of build an understanding of yourself, your personality, and your self awareness, then this is where you can get that "vibe" as to whether a workplace is good for you or not, or if a job is good for you or not etc too.

Maybe there is less depersonalisation happening as well. I did not understand this term before until I read it here online, but then I am beginning to understand this too. It is important to find work that fits well with yourself, in order to feel progressive in your own life. Now I realised that it is indeed okay to let go of past work, and continue to move forward and or into different environments etc.
 

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A useful framework I've found valuable about INFP Career Satisfaction comes from Paul Tieger's book Do What You Are:

As an INFP, career satisfaction means doing work that:

1. Is in harmony with my own personal values and beliefs and allows me to express my vision through my work.
2. Gives me time to develop substantial depth to my ideas and maintain control over the process and product.
3. Is done autonomously, with a private work space and plenty of uninterrupted time, but with periodic opportunities to bounce my ideas off people I feel respect me.
4. Is done within a flexible structure, with a minimum of rules or regulations, letting me work on projects when I feel inspired.
5. Is done with other creative and caring individuals in a cooperative environment free from tension and interpersonal strife.
6. Lets me express my originality and in which personal growth is encouraged and rewarded.
7. Does not require me to present my work frequently in front of groups of people or be called upon to share before it is completed to my satisfaction.
8. Allows me to help others grow and develop and realize their full potential.
9. Involves understanding people and discovering what makes them tick; allows me to develop deep one-to-one relationships with others.
10. Allows me to work toward fulfilling my ideals and not be limited by political, financial, or other obstacles.

I printed this out and have it hanging on my wall. Any time I am making a career decision I refer to it. My work doesn't get all ten points yet, but that is my goal.
 

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Hey Agent of Change,

Thanks for the awesome message. Very informative, thoughtful and realistically written. As much as I love creating fiction, as long as there is a way to make videos for a living, I'm happy. Although, I'll always have a special place for narratives. So when you said work your passion projects on the side, I totally understand you. Editing from home seen great, you would have a ton of free time which I'd like because I don't like being tied down. May I ask though, how do you charge your clients?

I'm not surprised at the 100 replies! It's ridiculous.

Yes, I am hoping to do a college program in media arts (I'm 17 y.o., btw), which specialises in all aspects of filmmaking, it is more narrative directed by the looks of it. Do you recommend going? Did you go?

No, I haven't. But, I'll take a look!

Right now, I have a Canon 60D with an 15-85mm IS AF lens. I also have my Dad's old 50mm & 28mm primes which I use the most. They're very soft, which I love. How about you?

Thanks again!

Redhotpengy,

Currently, much of my work comes from two companies that send me work. The benefit is that I've built up a relationship with them and they send me work. The negative is that I have to do about 20 jobs a month to hit my income target. This doesn't allow the high quality work I desire. But it adds a lot of variety. I have a few of my own clients, and the ideal is to have 100% client work. That pays better and is more on point.

The college program in the media arts sounds cool. I am glad I went to college. No regrets. I am not a believer in student loans though. I worked full time and went to school part time and paid cash. Having huge student loans will cause problems later. A fellow friend from our college has over $100k of student loans. I have none. He went full time, I went part time. He graduated, and I didn't, but in this field it doesn't matter. Your portfolio is what sells, not your degree. He is crazy talented with motion gfx, but his monthly student loan payment is something like $800 - $1,000 a month. Stupid.

If you are going to do the college program I would try to work full time and pay for it as you go. Unless your parents are paying for it. If you graduate with no loans you'll have more options and more creative freedom.

Gear wise, I shoot with a JVC HD110 with accessories. I've put close to 700 hours on it and am super bored with it. I definitely want to play with DSLR's and primes. I also have an ARRI light kit, and some Chimera soft lights along with some decent audio gear. I am basically one man band. I heard some one say once that a videographer that doesn't know lighting can earn $50,000, but a videographer that knows lighting can earn $100,000. Lighting is one of my favorite subjects. Cinematography is super interesting to me. I want to get a DSLR and play! Got a wife and two kids, so it is not as easy to buy gear. That is the challenge with this industry. There will ALWAYS be more toys one can buy.

The 60D is a solid camera and you have some nice lenses. You can do good work with that. Do you have audio gear?
 
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Redhotpengy,

Currently, much of my work comes from two companies that send me work. The benefit is that I've built up a relationship with them and they send me work. The negative is that I have to do about 20 jobs a month to hit my income target. This doesn't allow the high quality work I desire. But it adds a lot of variety. I have a few of my own clients, and the ideal is to have 100% client work. That pays better and is more on point.

The college program in the media arts sounds cool. I am glad I went to college. No regrets. I am not a believer in student loans though. I worked full time and went to school part time and paid cash. Having huge student loans will cause problems later. A fellow friend from our college has over $100k of student loans. I have none. He went full time, I went part time. He graduated, and I didn't, but in this field it doesn't matter. Your portfolio is what sells, not your degree. He is crazy talented with motion gfx, but his monthly student loan payment is something like $800 - $1,000 a month. Stupid.

If you are going to do the college program I would try to work full time and pay for it as you go. Unless your parents are paying for it. If you graduate with no loans you'll have more options and more creative freedom.

Gear wise, I shoot with a JVC HD110 with accessories. I've put close to 700 hours on it and am super bored with it. I definitely want to play with DSLR's and primes. I also have an ARRI light kit, and some Chimera soft lights along with some decent audio gear. I am basically one man band. I heard someone say once that a videographer that doesn't know lighting can earn $50,000, but a videographer that knows lighting can earn $100,000. Lighting is one of my favorite subjects. Cinematography is super interesting to me. I want to get a DSLR and play! Got a wife and two kids, so it is not as easy to buy gear. That is the challenge with this industry. There will ALWAYS be more toys one can buy.

The 60D is a solid camera and you have some nice lenses. You can do good work with that. Do you have audio gear?
Twenty jobs a month? Wow, that's a lot. Is there always a lot of pressure to get them done? If you don't mind sharing, what is your income target?

Ah yes, of course. However, I live in Canada so the price is much lower (I'd say total $40,000 for 4 years). It's still a lot, but thankfully my parents have money saved for this. I'll still have to help them out, of course.

You're definitely spot on when it comes to the portfolio; that's the only thing that really shows you can make a film. No matter what school you go to, if your portfolio sucks you'll get nowhere.

DSLRs are very fun to film with. In terms of controlling the camera, it feels somewhat like you're shooting on film; primes, adjusting shutter speed, manual focusing, no smoothing (depends on the lens), etc. What's really cool is that a hacking project called Magic Lantern made a modification that allows you to film raw DNGs (digital negatives). The results are spectacular; on a 5D Mark iii, you can shoot raw 4k! However, I can probably film about less than 5 seconds of raw uncompressed 1728p video; about 15-20 seconds worth of 720p, and this is on a class 10 card. Still, raw 720p looks better than compressed 1080p.

As for audio gear, I'm pretty limited. I only have a rode shotgun mic. The last narrative I shot, I actually did all the audio in post, and it wasn't too bad! Mind you, I was going for a Fellini-esque style...

I'm also curious about cinematography; the saying you have is definitely true. Lighting is key.

Do you have a reel I could see?
 

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That is not true. Managers are supposed to be keeping stability and harmony, and that means, knowing other people's personalities and getting the best out of a group of people, and ensuring that the dynamic of a group of people is sustainable, and so forth. Giving their subordinates what they want, and ensuring that they get the best benefit etc.

We are also good at being human resources too... Training people. Making the best of how to turn an employee around and building up an empire.


I have to job hunt again, but I have thought about these kidn of roles, and it sounds more and more appealing. I have seen some INFPs. or NFs.. going into teaching, and actually then working for the UN. I still want to try and work for the UN, even though I feel so broken right now. Demotivated and spiritually zapped. Each day, I get criticised for what I have learnt for the past 10 years.... That is ridiculous.
Managers are definitely something INFPs can do well. Unfortunately, a lot of companies use 'manager' as a spot for employees to climb the company ladder and it involves a lot of politics. :(

Best of luck to you in your situation. I can't know how hard your particular situation is, but I do know how hard it can be to feel drained and unappreciated.
 

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INFP can do anything well. They just need to develop mental stability and soundness, I guess.

Also, gently start learning to be responsible and exercise the secondary and tertiary functions in practical situations.

But don't forget that satisfaction lies within.
 

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An INFP is a passionate creature. If it's possible to make money off one's passion in an environment that isn't stressful, that's the way to go. If not, a job that's simple to train or school for and leaves enough time and energy in the week to pursue such passions is important.

Of course, that's very vague and a little obvious for career advice, isn't it?
 
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