Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was just curious today as to how people "feel" feelings and if it is actually different from type to type.

I know for me when I "feel" something I can usually tell because my stomach feels.... a tingling, sometimes warm, sensation.. almost like I have a stomach ache.

My INFP friend said something about his heart... I wasn't listening... but here please post how you know you are "feeling" an emotion, preferably some physical description of the feeling if possible.

Thanks in advance,
Dartos
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11 Posts
My feelings often manifest physically. My heart races, my face turns red, I get butterflies in my stomach, etc. Depending on the feeling of course. As an Fi dom sometimes these feelings are overwhelming and I have a hard time ignoring anxiety, excitement, embarrassment, etc.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11 Posts
Do you physically "feel" different with each of these emotions? They are all the same for me.
Hmm, they are similar but certainly not identical. Embarrassment and anxiety are very similar as they both involve a racing mind and heart and almost over heating. Excitement is more of a manic feeling, but usually no racing heart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,382 Posts
My feelings often manifest physically. My heart races, my face turns red, I get butterflies in my stomach, etc. Depending on the feeling of course. As an Fi dom sometimes these feelings are overwhelming and I have a hard time ignoring anxiety, excitement, embarrassment, etc.
These are affects, not necessarily feelings (definitely not the sophisticated rational feelings that Jung was talking about - these are physical feelings that come from the sympathetic nervous system under stress that a person most likely hasn't rationalized). This can be any type. If these get rationalized in a meaningful way, you might be heading a little more into the feeling territory that Jung was talking about (which, he thought could be a completely unemotional process like thinking - both can get tied to emotions as well, which would be a sign of a lack of differentiation). Feeling definitely abstracts from current emotional experience over any given length of time (although inferior feeling might be more tied to current experiences that tend to fall flat when not considered against the same stimulus in a specific frame of mind - the person's feelings might turn to something kind of stifled (inferior Fi) or feelings of unfamiliarity might make a person have trouble grounding their own feelings (inferior Fe)).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11 Posts
Interesting, and a goodd point. If feeling and thinking are the 'rational' functions, then why is F so stereotypically seen as 'irrational'? XD But, I think the fact that feelers 'judge' the things they 'perceive' so subjectively can certainly influence the depth and frecuency with which they experience emotions, negative or otherwise. If a thinker is less likely to judge things personally, indeed they will probably be less emotional than a feeler, even if that is not exactly what Jung intended for Feeling to mean.

It's all about framing. Subjectivity can often lead to stress, misunderstanding and strong feelings/emotions/affects.

Although I'm not really sure this is what the OP intended.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I had this idea a while ago that people with the Thinking preference simple did not have the ability to abstract external stimuli in such a way that they could just "feel" it. They had to break it down so that it could be understood in a concrete manner. Kind of the way S is compared to N.

It was just an idea though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
When I get into an argument my voice gets really shaky, and when I have to talk in front of too many people sometimes it feels like my throat is closing up and I have to squeeze the words out one by one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,382 Posts
Lol. Thinkers and feelers are not types of people - everyone does both, but these functions tend to have a different amount of decisive influence over choices made and whatnot in people. Fe types are objective feelers - their feelings don't judge personally. And also, why feelings are considered so irrational? Probably because people literally have no clue what feelings really are in our thinking dominated society - they're viewed as random because they can't easily be effectively communicated to help other people, as everyone has different feelings and different influence from them. But the process itself is indeed rational and not necessarily emotional at all. As I said before, affects/emotions are not the feeling function, nor are moments of personal significance the feeling function (this would just be introversion in general). The feeling function is just a kind of reasoning that doesn't adhere to concepts that everyone does, but inferior feeling types generally repress this as insignificant to their rationales while dominant feeling types check their rationales against this process first. It's just evaluation of how something makes an impact on a person. If it's you aux/tert. function, it probably isn't all that influential toward your personal psychology in a positive sense (Jung kind of implies this about the aux. T/F types having rather negative experiences with judgments). I mean, sure they will have important moments with this function, but it's influence isn't particularly decisive in these types, since they decide with absolution through perception, not judgment. And no, feeling isn't just knowing that you "like something." It's generally less personal than it's made out to be online, although it certainly can operate within the realm of the personal (but then again, so can thinking). It can also operate within the realm of stuff that really has no direct relation to the person at all and possibly tie something to the personal life of the individual on some level. So with Fi doms, like all introverts, they may experience moments of personal import that just get evaluated by the feeling process, but the moments themselves have nothing to do with feeling. It's weird how people mix up the feeling process with actual subjective concerns - feeling is merely a process that can be as impersonal as intuition/thinking/sensation - the subjective concerns of the Fi dom just get filtered through an evaluative lens, but the content is the same as what may be subjectively considered by any other introvert. Fi is just the function that the person uses to be an introvert at all. It's pretty hard to intellectually communicate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Either I am mistaken about my type or I believe you misunderstand that Thinkers can have strong emotions too. From the sound of it, it seems that you believe IxTP's do not have much feeling. I have emotions all the time, but I just don't want everyone to know what they are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,221 Posts
Good question...... I suppose positive feelings feel kind of tingly and negative feelings feel more like sickness? Maybe some more sensing types would know better, I think my inferior S is messing things up here :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,382 Posts
A lot of what gets associated with IRL feelings comes from sensation, not the feeling function (Jung states explicitly that "feelings" of pleasure, etc. are often sought through sensation, making the dom Se types luxury lovers and inferior Se types almost self-torturous when it comes to just "being" and aesthetic comfort/how they manage everyday living in terms of inevitably normal experiences of life). Feeling like you're going to cry, etc. Feelings themselves are a whole other phenomenon related more to the mind than the nervous system and "fight-flight" impulses. The rational feelings are image-related - stimulated by rationales and rationality, often with reference to ideals and significance. Related to how one rationalizes from ideals of self experience or experiences that connect others. Everyone has feelings and everyone does this in equal enough capacity, it's just how much of a determining factor for your ego choices feelings wind up being that gives you a type - if feeling is an aux. function for you, it's probably fairly irrelevant to you - Jung would probably say that "it just belongs to the things that happen to you" - not to how your consciousness relates to reality. If it's an inferior, then that's where you're characteristically touchy and likely just kind of functioning from your own kind of personal culture from (e.g. combating projections from in order to use, etc.). I mean, inferior feeling certainly can have it's bright and normal moments, I think it's more the orientation of feeling that gets repressed in these types (e.g. Fi in inferior Fe types) that's almost abnormal and not sufficiently helping the person to keep the other side of their feeling in touch (so, often, with inferior Fe types, you might get someone who tends to have almost unconscious co-dependency on the feelings of others in order to establish their own - the kind of person who's own feelings are so repressed, that they don't sufficiently help the person to ignore input that has no relationship to themselves from the outside world - inferior Fi might be the kind of feeling that causes people issues when forming connections with other people, because they repress Fe so much - they might be easily paranoid about their relationships with others and have trouble knowing how others feel about them).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,472 Posts
Since this is a forum on emotion, I've just realized something. I tend to rate my emotional state by how organized my mind feels:

When I'm happy, my mind is very organized; I can be extremely rational, calm, and collected. I can keep up with several thought processes at once. I tend to be a lot more competent when I'm in a happy state.

When I'm depressed, my mind becomes a little sloppy. It's like a room, that's for the most part orderly, but a little cluttered, with socks on the floor here and there.

When I'm angry, my mind is like a house that a tornado just past, and all you can see are bright colors like red and oranges. (I really think the term "seeing red" is partially literal) I can't get anything accomplished when I'm in this state; I become pretty stupid.

I've noticed that I also relate emotion to temperature. When I'm sad or depressed, I feel colder; when I'm angry I feel kinda hot; when I'm feeling peace and love toward the ones around me, I feel a comfy kind of warmth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,133 Posts
Lol. Thinkers and feelers are not types of people - everyone does both, but these functions tend to have a different amount of decisive influence over choices made and whatnot in people.
I'm not sure this was the OP's point. He wasn't saying thinkers don't feel, he is just curious if different types experience feelings differently, which seems like a pretty valid question to me.

I tend to imagine my feelings in terms of different qualities--whether they make me feel full or empty, warm or cold, peaceful or unsettled. The best feelings, to me, are the full feelings--many different feelings can make me feel full, but they are the ones that seem important, meaningful and immersive.

Like others, I also feel things physically--anxiety can make me feel sick to my stomach, or give me a headache. Pride or embarrassment makes me blush.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,382 Posts
No one experiences feelings "differently" (this would be like saying that inferior sensation types sense something that no one else is capable of sensing). The feel of feelings would be the same in every type on a basic enough level - it's just, to some, feelings are kind of indispensible to their everyday functioning, while to others, they can't really see the point/any meaningful purpose for them in their lives. That's all. It's psychological differences, not literal ones. Rationalizing from feeling just might seem kind of unrelated to the ego identity of dominant thinkers, while to dominant feelers, it's the thing they feel like they would not be able to live without.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,382 Posts
This isn't to say inferior feeling types don't show a lot of feeling - they certainly may, but it's often related to the things they feel "aren't them" (which, of course, can be very hard to notice IRL - same goes for when something "is them," although these episodes are more rare and striking) - Jung said inferior Fe types tend to be easily irritated and inferior Fi types tend to be prone to falling into bouts of irrationalism under the spell of intense feeling. And of course, they have enough basic feeling to get by in the real world most of the time anyhow (if they didn't there's no way these types would be leaving home at all - same goes for anyone else's inferior functions - if this is the case, it's probably a very mentally ill person).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,472 Posts
No one experiences feelings "differently" (this would be like saying that inferior sensation types sense something that no one else is capable of sensing). The feel of feelings would be the same in every type on a basic enough level - it's just, to some, feelings are kind of indispensible to their everyday functioning, while to others, they can't really see the point/any meaningful purpose for them in their lives. That's all. It's psychological differences, not literal ones. Rationalizing from feeling just might seem kind of unrelated to the ego identity of dominant thinkers, while to dominant feelers, it's the thing they feel like they would not be able to live without.
I agree with this: I don't think different types feel emotions differently, but I do believe different types give different emotions priority.

I find, for instance, extroverts tend to be more likely to pursue happiness, may seek that happiness through some kind of external stimulation, I guess depending on what their dominant function is. Whereas introverts tend to seek meaning, and tend to prefer being in a place where they can feel more serene and collected than, to seek the extrovert's definition of "happy".

I've observed, also, so far, that feeler types tend to give feelings of guilt a lot of priority, because feeler types tend to have high standards when it comes to values, so they'd have more of a prickly conscience always prodding them with things like "do what's right!" or "that wasn't nice"; I've noticed, myself, as a Fe user, I do tend to correlate emotion with my values. If I behave in accord with my conscience, I tend to be rewarded with a positive emotion, but if I behave in a way out of harmony with my values, I get punished with a very strong negative emotion to discourage me from doing that again. I'm sure thinking types would experience this too sometimes, but I'm not sure to what point. I'm not sure what emotion would take more precedent in someone who prefers to make decisions based on logic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,382 Posts
I agree with this: I don't think different types feel emotions differently, but I do believe different types give different emotions priority.

I find, for instance, extroverts tend to be more likely to pursue happiness, may seek that happiness through some kind of external stimulation, I guess depending on what their dominant function is. Whereas introverts tend to seek meaning, and tend to prefer being in a place where they can feel more serene and collected than, to seek the extrovert's definition of "happy".

I've observed, also, so far, that feeler types tend to give feelings of guilt a lot of priority, because feeler types tend to have high standards when it comes to values, so they'd have more of a prickly conscience always prodding them with things like "do what's right!" or "that wasn't nice"; I've noticed, myself, as a Fe user, I do tend to correlate emotion with my values. If I behave in accord with my conscience, I tend to be rewarded with a positive emotion, but if I behave in a way out of harmony with my values, I get punished with a very strong negative emotion to discourage me from doing that again. I'm sure thinking types would experience this too sometimes, but I'm not sure to what point. I'm not sure what emotion would take more precedent in someone who prefers to make decisions based on logic.
Well, I'm supposedly an INTJ (sort of a crude fit into that (stereo)type, lol) and I know what it's like to violate a sense of personal ethics/expectations - I've had the same thing happen before...frankly, I don't really let these feelings get in the way of my progress though - I just keep going (I think it's largely just the complexes I have around ideas of what I would/wouldn't want to see happen to myself influencing this, not type). It's one of those things that might be related to type (at least the extent to which it wreaks havoc with your ego), but also just as easily related to personal complexes. Emotion has nothing to do with type, period. I mean, someone who prefers logic is doing this based on emotions as well - they're not doing it for nothing. I know plenty of thinkers who get annoyed at themselves for stepping outside of their own values (see inferior Fe types - they tend to be "all-or-nothing" about this). Frankly, I would think someone who represses feeling would be more touchy about violating their own values than someone who can consciously manage it's reverberations toward their ego (any non-inferior F type, basically).
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top