Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Dreaming is connecting our awareness to different realm. Dreaming is changing the shape of our consciousness differently that would make ourselves experiencing it as different kind of realms.

The purpose of it:


  1. For short-term compensation (which may relieve tension)
  2. Strengthening certain empathy (respect the value of a certain quality, for example, when we were crying for someone within our dream, it may lead us to respect the value of specific relationship)
  3. To reflect the quality of our lives with honestly (the more neat and comfortable state of dream, the more our lives seem peaceful)
  4. Practicing something and to be connected to the information that can not be conveyed on waking life (for example, the use of lucid dream to help us practicing specific expertise or to get past life regression, and so forth)
  5. To realize that there is dimension beyond everyday life that can accommodate and influence (interacts with) our consciousness (it asserts that there is another reality waiting to be explored)
Less or more
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
607 Posts
Jung said that dreams connect us to potential; that these images we experience are all possibilities which lead us to our full potential. That is the notion behind psychoanalysis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,528 Posts
A way for your brain to "expand" and exercise it's schema and understanding without limitations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Dreams help us process new, emotionally important information, and add it to our conceptual memory system. Once the information is in our memory, it influences our waking behavior and decisions. Dreaming can help us understand new experiences, prepare us for change, help cope with trauma and loss, and facilitate learning.

Example

Help us understand new experiences
REM dreams link new events to old ones, putting them in context. For example, if you’re feeling anxious about your job, you may dream about another anxious time, like when you were taking a test in college.

Prepare us for change
Dreams can be a rehearsal for new challenges. When a person in love dreams about weddings or an athlete dreams about competitions, this helps the dreamer mentally prepare for the future.

Help cope with trauma and loss
People going through divorces and found that those who were the most depressed in their waking lives had the flattest, least emotional dreams, while those who were managing well had highly expressive, furious dreams, complete with scenes of throwing objects at their soon-to-be exes.

Facilitate learning
Non-REM dreams, which tend to reflect the day’s events, may help us consolidate new information. In a series of studies being conducted at Harvard, sleep-lab subjects were asked to play the video game Tetris. Later, when woken during the first stage of sleep, of those who could recall their dreams, three-quarters were dreaming about Tetris. The researchers believe that by dreaming about the game, the subjects were working on perfecting their skills as they slept.

One word; fascinating.

:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
I've always taken it in another way, dreams could be what happens in REM sleep, but in no way do they have any connection to our potential or spirit or whatever. I love Jung, but this is where I divide from him. He cares about how humanity interprets biological functions. I don't.

They are simply the mind accessing memories and generating new ones. Why? Because of what REM is as a biological process. Now what is REM sleep for? Assuming that it isn't some random thing and natural selection lead it to be useful, I don't know, but I have ideas.

I compare the human brain to that of a computer. Now why would a computer go through this stage?

First of which is anti-corruption, and thus that would explain why many many subconscious memories are triggered. The brain does a scan of all necessary functions, and makes sure your reflexes work. Problems. You cannot go through all of your reflexes while sleeping. Solution, your eyes function as an extension of your body. This would be fairly pleasurable. Or horrifyingly painful, in case it does it wrong.

Second, the brain is resetting itself. See a computer reboot. After a while of a computer being on, it gets errors. Then you turn it off and turn it on, and those errors go away because the functions that are causing the errors are off. Mostly. Corruption is inevitable in such systems. See above for a fail-safe.

Third. Re-balancing of chemicals like serotonin and others I have no idea the name for.

So uh yeah. Shoot this down. Please. I'd love to be wrong. Well, that is a lie, but yeah there is my extremely agnostic interpretation of REM sleep. :tongue:

Now onto the implications. My bad eyesight could have a connection to me sleeping poorly, because bad eyesight can sometimes be from misshapen eyes. REM uses the eyes, and if it causes pain, it shuts off.

There's more implied if the above is true, I'm not going into it.

In the case of nightmares, at least the kind I have had, it is from REM doing it wrong. It hurts. Real bad.

So uh yeah, these are all assumptions/hypotheses. Especially the one about eyes. And pain causing REM to stop. Go find data and disprove/prove me right or wrong. I'm going to leave and come back in a week or more's time.

Well, if this is the case, I know why I have short-term memory loss, among other psychological problems I cannot control.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,077 Posts
Personally, I think it is relative to people's psychological makeup. Some people suffer more from bad dreams/nightmares/what you will, and some have more realistic dreams. Some people have much ease with entering lucidity in their dreams. People who suffer from anxiety are much more likely to have dreams of their general or current fears, versus someone who is completely happy with their life and doing what they love, someone who has no regrets, etc.

In short, the purpose of dreams is non existent. They're purely relative to the conditions around us and how we react to them. They're subconscious fears and reactions to what happens to us, and maybe, if I had to say they had a purpose, their purpose would be keeping us grounded into reality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
971 Posts
Personally, I know daydreaming can bring me serenity, solace or simply allow me to expand or give substance to my thoughts/feelings.

Also a quote I like:
''I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas; they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.''
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Dreams help us process new, emotionally important information, and add it to our conceptual memory system. Once the information is in our memory, it influences our waking behavior and decisions. Dreaming can help us understand new experiences, prepare us for change, help cope with trauma and loss, and facilitate learning.

Example

Help us understand new experiences
REM dreams link new events to old ones, putting them in context. For example, if you’re feeling anxious about your job, you may dream about another anxious time, like when you were taking a test in college.

Facilitate learning
Non-REM dreams, which tend to reflect the day’s events, may help us consolidate new information. In a series of studies being conducted at Harvard, sleep-lab subjects were asked to play the video game Tetris. Later, when woken during the first stage of sleep, of those who could recall their dreams, three-quarters were dreaming about Tetris. The researchers believe that by dreaming about the game, the subjects were working on perfecting their skills as they slept.

One word; fascinating.

:cool:
Dreams is a way of the unconscious to "release our tension" and "breathe". It gives psychological balance.
All of these are consistent with reverse learning. The process in which the brain removes "parasitic thoughts" and organizes relevant thoughts. Every single day and every single experience creates parasitic thoughts. So much of it. Your brain needs a mechanism to organize relevant thoughts and to purge parasitic thoughts. Dreaming is that mechanism.

Similar to what Regina said, these parasitic thoughts create tension if left to linger. That explains the mental fatigue when not allowing yourself a break during hard mind-taxing work and depriving yourself of sleep.

I'm amazed by dreams, particularly lucid dreams, unfortunately I've been having sleep problems/disturbances since my head injury. After my head injury I would only have nightmares, but I can't remember any of my dreams. My wife at the time (now ex) would tell me I was not having very sweet dreams. I wish I can dream again. I'm totally out of balance. I don't know if it's because of the actual head injury or the resulting sleep disturbances or the inability to dream/remember dreams. Just out of balance, and it sucks. Obviously the injury caused it all, but the actual "out of balance" feeling, I don't know what to attribute to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,223 Posts
I think it's just a way for your brain to shuffle the day's events into place amongst everything else, as well as bigger ongoing issues in life.
I kept a dream diary off and on for many years and analysed my dreams, and I found nothing particularly meaningful or mystical about any of them, but they did relate to events and people that were important at the time.
 

·
Not a Robot
Joined
·
2,150 Posts
My dreams seem to exist solely to provide entertainment. The latest recurring theme involves laser-shooting spinning tops. I'm so disappointed when I wake up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,259 Posts
I think dreams are a result of hormones either behaving in reverse of how they behaved consciously so as to restore balance or in mimic to what you experience consciously so as to strengthen the effect of those hormones.

Addiction, fear, stress are examples of mimicking conscious hormones and your dreams reflect this. Like dreaming of a game you played all day, or dreaming of what you are afraid of happening or dreaming of not getting what you want. Or sexual dreams because you are overexposing your mind to sexual things.

The opposite would be relief dreams. Sexual dreams because you're not thinking about pleasure enough, stressful dreams because you're not caring enough, stress relieving dreams because you're too stressed.

It depends on what you want. Do you want balance? Or do you want focus? Sleeping decides if you should keep focusing where you focus or if you should have a break focusing where you focus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Sleep-lab subjects were asked to play the video game Tetris. Later, when woken during the first stage of sleep, of those who could recall their dreams, three-quarters were dreaming about Tetris. The researchers believe that by dreaming about the game, the subjects were working on perfecting their skills as they slept.

One word; fascinating.

:cool:
Fascinating indeed. I'm a fan of Tetris. My experience is that when I play it, I think about it while in bed trying to sleep. It just plays in my head, I don't even control the randomness of the blocks. Here is the strange thing, just things aren't static in dreams (like fine text, or the time on a clock), the pile of blocks shifts when my focus changes. This also happens while bored or daydreaming after having played Tetris.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
Personally I think dreams have no evolutionary purpose and are a side effect of REM sleep, purpose comes from the REM, but with some knowhow you can be enlightened from them. I think dreams come from the outer brain translating signals from the deep brain, imo REM sleep connects far flung regions of the brain.

On a similar note there's psycobilin aka the active ingredient of magic mushrooms, it connects the brain more than usual and makes you hallucinate. And hallucinations are basically the same as waking dreams.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,421 Posts
Dreaming has no purpose. Just like doing taxes or dancing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Personally I think dreams have no evolutionary purpose and are a side effect of REM sleep, purpose comes from the REM, but with some knowhow you can be enlightened from them. I think dreams come from the outer brain translating signals from the deep brain, imo REM sleep connects far flung regions of the brain.

On a similar note there's psycobilin aka the active ingredient of magic mushrooms, it connects the brain more than usual and makes you hallucinate. And hallucinations are basically the same as waking dreams.
I think you're confusing psilocybin with the closely related DMT (dimethyltryptamine), both of which are a tryptamine, and both of which play on the function of serotonin (another tryptamine). DMT hallucinations are more like the type of dream you would get while asleep. Mushroom hallucinations are more like dreaming in a waking state, with gassy stomach pain. The same gland that makes endogenous DMT in vertebrates also makes melatonin (yet another tryptamine), which regulates sleep patterns. I'm not a pro in brain chemistry, there might be a link between DMT and psilocyin, but I think DMT is more likely to be a connection between dreaming and hallucinogens than shrooms. Or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
738 Posts
I think you're confusing psilocybin with the closely related DMT (dimethyltryptamine), both of which are a tryptamine, and both of which play on the function of serotonin (another tryptamine). DMT hallucinations are more like the type of dream you would get while asleep. Mushroom hallucinations are more like dreaming in a waking state, with gassy stomach pain. The same gland that makes endogenous DMT in vertebrates also makes melatonin (yet another tryptamine), which regulates sleep patterns. I'm not a pro in brain chemistry, there might be a link between DMT and psilocyin, but I think DMT is more likely to be a connection between dreaming and hallucinogens than shrooms. Or not.
Yeah, the whole point was my thought that an interconnected brain can give you visions. Also that REM sleep likely does this for its assimilation and defraging of data functions, and dreams could just be a side effect and not their own function/purpose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Yeah, the whole point was my thought that an interconnected brain can give you visions. Also that REM sleep likely does this for its assimilation and defraging of data functions, and dreams could just be a side effect and not their own function/purpose.
I more or less agree. The brain is sorting what's relevant, and in the process we have dreams (side effect). Or it might serve the function of our brain asking us for help in determining relevance, and our actions in our dreams have an effect on what or how a certain "fragment" is stored or retained. This can also explain the deep and profound perceptual experiences certain psychedelic substances have on a person's mind; the brain sorts out what is being perceived during a waking state?

Truly mysterious the way the mind works, the more we try to understand the more questions we run into.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top