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I'm interested in what your teaching styles are- whether you've had experience in teaching, or even if it's just hypothetical and your post is about how your teaching style would be if you were a teacher. For the sake of discussion, let's say it's a smaller class setting-15-20 students in... a university setting ( just because this way, we don't have to deal with the classroom management stuff that comes along with teaching kids).

how structured or planned would the class be? what type of teaching goals would you have mine? how would your relationship with the students be? how specific would you be in assignments? what kind of students would you like or dislike the most? would you have things decided/planned way in advance or would you be more likely to go along with the flow and see how things fall into place? would you be more laidback or..? how helpful/involved would you be? (<- this is interested, because I noticed that my 'feeler' professors/teachers have a harder time with this. in trying to be helpful, they end up giving away the answers to students who make the effort, but my 'thinker" professors/teachers were more guarded and always tried to NOT give any hint about the answers or would pause before responding to make sure no answer was accidentally revealed).
 

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I am currently in college for Elementary Ed so I have to consider all of these things currently, how I would like my classroom. For a college setting, I would say loosely structured, with a lesson and all, but open for discussion. Teaching goals would be to have the students learn as much information as possible without it all being only in working memory and quickly forgotten, but also have fun at the same time. I would have assignments structured, but vague enough (at college level) so they can make final output of the assignment their own. I would like students who work hard in the class in assignments and discussion and would have a hard time with the students who just don't care about the class or school in general (they are always the hardest). I would have the curriculum of the day planned out enough to have a foothold for the class, but from the beginning of class on, it can take its own twists and turns as the class sees fit to discuss as long as the daily goal of learning the lessons are learned in the end (you can always find a way to sneak the ideas and lessons into discussion). I would be laid-back but have my expectations of what should be accomplished be known to all the students. I would be very involved and helpful in the class, since that is just how I am, I would want to make myself as available to them as possible in order to ensure their success if they wish to succeed. You need not give away the answers like you had said, but lead the students to the answers as much as you can (In math, try to work out the problem and discuss how the answer is to be found and make sure they understand the steps that they need to know before they can fully understand the problem, etc.).

I hope this helps :happy:
 

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how structured or planned would the class be? what type of teaching goals would you have mine? how would your relationship with the students be? how specific would you be in assignments? what kind of students would you like or dislike the most? would you have things decided/planned way in advance or would you be more likely to go along with the flow and see how things fall into place? would you be more laidback or..? how helpful/involved would you be? (<- this is interested, because I noticed that my 'feeler' professors/teachers have a harder time with this. in trying to be helpful, they end up giving away the answers to students who make the effort, but my 'thinker" professors/teachers were more guarded and always tried to NOT give any hint about the answers or would pause before responding to make sure no answer was accidentally revealed).
I've tutored elementary kids a few years ago. I'd say I'm more of a structured teacher since I like to plan ahead (I suck at improvising). My biggest goal would be for them to like what they're learning instead of learning for the sake of getting it/passing/pleasing parents. I would want to be an older sibling figure for them, but I always end up being taken advantage of (lol) especially the hyper kids.. I really don't know how to get them to sit down for 5 minutes :confused: I liked the students who listened to me and did their work, but I really liked the students who liked learning. I was tutoring this one kid who loved english and I was helping her with grammar and she seemed really into it. This was a grade 5 by the way.. I was just so happy because, well, nobody likes grammar haha. I wouldn't dislike any kids, although I'd be annoyed by those who try to challenge me as an authority figure. Ultimately though, I try to see this as something to overcome instead of giving up. I would want to let the student know that I want to help him/her. Ideally I wouldn't want to give the answer right away, but you're right, I tend to do that, because I don't want the student to feel helpless or give up too fast.
 

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I'm in my first year of teaching college freshmen. I teach composition, the first required English class. Usually I start each class with a free-write. These are graded for completion, not correctness. Usually I give them prompts, which are sometimes related to their reading or the day's assignment, although I've found that they write more and write more enthusiastically if I give them creative prompts. Generally I encourage a lot of discussion, which the free-writes are designed to stimulate ideas for; I hate speaking in front of groups, so it's easier for me if the students talk, plus they pay more attention the more they are actively involved.

I've found that my students want very specific guidelines for assignments, but I want them to be creative and tackle the assignments in their own way, so as a compromise, I've started giving them the grading rubric I will use to assess the assignment. Students often then take an approach to the assignment that I never would have anticipated, but so long as the basic criteria are met, I'm satisfied. I like to change things up from day to day, so we'll have class discussions one day, then small group activities another day, then independent or partner work another day.

The students I like best are those who work hard not just for the grade, but for the knowledge. The ones who are most discouraging are those who are completely apathetic or openly hostile. (My students tend to be black/white thinkers, and some are really angered if I challenge their world view.) Those who are most frustrating are the ones who are always wheedling me, hoping for answers, not because they want to know, but because they want me to feed them answers so they can get an easy A. Luckily, composition is based on their thoughts, so there aren't really answers for me to betray to them.

I have a quirky, witty sense of humor, and I use that in my lectures to keep my students paying attention. I've found that I actually prepare much less than I thought I would need to for lectures. I generally have a basic outline of what I plan to do for each class: take roll, free-write, lecture, activity, homework, etc. Within that lesson plan I have a basic outline of my lecture, but it's scarcely more than bullet points. I learned my lecture style from one of my favorite profs. She would always ask us questions and, based on our answers, she would ask more questions, leading us to "discover" the answers she wanted us to find. That process was more helpful to me than someone just telling me the answer. I'm not really so much a lecturer as a "discussion facilitator."
 

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Well, I'm not a teacher, but I have one INFJ teacher who used to be an INFJ when she was younger, but she changed over time.

She is by far the nicest teacher ever! She can be really silly at times and loves music poetry and art. (She is our French teacher.)

INFJ's make the best teachers. :laughing:
 

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I'm interested in what your teaching styles are- whether you've had experience in teaching, or even if it's just hypothetical and your post is about how your teaching style would be if you were a teacher. For the sake of discussion, let's say it's a smaller class setting-15-20 students in... a university setting ( just because this way, we don't have to deal with the classroom management stuff that comes along with teaching kids).

how structured or planned would the class be? what type of teaching goals would you have mine? how would your relationship with the students be? how specific would you be in assignments? what kind of students would you like or dislike the most? would you have things decided/planned way in advance or would you be more likely to go along with the flow and see how things fall into place? would you be more laidback or..? how helpful/involved would you be? (<- this is interested, because I noticed that my 'feeler' professors/teachers have a harder time with this. in trying to be helpful, they end up giving away the answers to students who make the effort, but my 'thinker" professors/teachers were more guarded and always tried to NOT give any hint about the answers or would pause before responding to make sure no answer was accidentally revealed).
I teach an adjunct course at the university for Anatomy.. class size is 22 students. Off the top of my head, there are about 2 freshman, 16 sophmores, and 4 juniors. Surprisingly, this semester and last semester there was absolutely no need for me to say anything about classroom behavior.

In terms of teaching styles, I use a lot of handouts for kinesthetic learning(them writing it out), use the chalkboard to write and draw diagrams of what I'm speaking of(for visual learners), and verbally speak and elaborate what I'm trying to demonstrate(for the auditory learners). I try to cover all bases so the students get different learning styles for the same material.

With regards to structure, I'm fairly structured. I don't plan my lessons until the day of presenting, but I always have something routinzed. My relationship with the students is VERY casual(lots of jokes and references to things that students find funny). The first week they kept calling me "professor" and "teacher" but I constantly reminded them to just call me "Jon." I realized early on that I'd still be able to hold their respect even if I made it more casual. I feel like I relate to them better when we're all on the same playing field. I actually feel like keeping it casual let them respect me more. And I'm fairly certain that they are much more willing to approach me with questions during office hours and outside of class(I gave them all my cell number for questions and contacts).

I was told I have a laidback style of teaching. I like to use analogies that are very pertinent to students and their lives so they'll understand the material better. The students I enjoy the most are the ones that show passion and enthusiasm. The students I dislike most are the ones that don't show as often as the others, or are just stuck in their own minds(which I actually relate to). I think it's interesting what you said about Feelers and Thinkers. When preparing them for an exam, I always phrase things like, "It would be good to know this *insert statement and wink wink*" just because I want them to do well. But of course, on top of wanting them to do well, it's more important for them to understand the material and not just memorize it(I place heavy emphasis on that).

And I always offer free tutoring. Sort of free... I just charge them for food for things off the dollar menu so it's cheap. Haha.

Curious0610 - What do you teach? What are your methods? What was the inspiration for the creation of this thread?


Edit- I believe it's the NF in me that drives me to keep things casual and approachable, mainly because I don't want them to feel inferior or incompetent. That's not to say I haven't said blunt and douchey things.. lol but I do keep things quite cool.
 

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I would say a very strict behavorist approach. Teachers who are strong behaviorists I have been most impressed with. Token systems work wonders at the elementary levels. A child gains privileges as his behavior improves in class and loses privileges for misbehavior. Whole class has reward system as well. That way whole class can gang up on a few students who are misbehaving to improve their behavior so they can get their reward. A lot of people have critism with time-outs, but hey they work well from what I have seen. I am all for behavior contracting. I have seen behavior contracts work wonders on some students.

As far as the actual instruction and class. I believe in very rigid clearly defined rules the whole class agrees upon that are displayed on the wall for everyone to see. I would make lessons planned in advance and clearly spelled out so I would have no hesitation teaching the lesson. I would go by a very set schedule in a planner with blocks of time for each activity all carefully planned out. I like routine, predictability, and things well planned out otherwise I go nuts.
 
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After reading your post I realized that part of what I do at work is actually teaching. I am in charge of assuring that a portion of my project's quality is above par, and to do that I have to task out other people to check the things I can't do alone. So I have to teach them what I need them to do, how to spot issues when they see them, how to report them when found, etc..

I'm definitely laid back about it. I've been blasting them with loads of information, letting it sink in, then seeing what they retain and doing it all over again. There is a lot of pointing out things that are not being performed to standard and could be improved upon, or trying to explain things that clearly aren't being understood. I approach everyone in a different way depending on how they seem to think about things. I don't treat them all slightly different on purpose really, but I figure it is probably an INFJ thing.

I've realized recently that the information I really need them to know is stuff that a lot of them won't just soak up, quickly so I've set about designing training documentation for them. If I ever have enough time away from my other work, I would like to dump everything I know into it. I hope to end up with pictures, video, diagrams, and some short and sweet blurbs of information that they can reference if the need.

A lot of my job takes place in my head when I am making decisions or thinking through a problem. So trying to get that out of my head, into easily digestible format, and into someone else's head without much information deterioration is proving difficult but interesting. So far it's frustrating and tedious trying to wing it. I think it would be more fun to teach college kids and have that be my job instead of trying to relay information out of sheer necessity and not having time set aside to do it. I'm sure I will end up putting some extra hours into this before I'm done. :p

Token systems work wonders at the elementary levels. A child gains privileges as his behavior improves in class and loses privileges for misbehavior.
My parents did this for me when I was 2-4 years old and again with my brother and me when I was 10-12 years old. I had to earn them through good deeds and doing chores. We could spend them on TV, games, or even toys if we saved a ton of them. It worked really well with me, not so well with my brother.
 

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As far as planning lessons.... I get all the materials together for each lesson planned out beforehand and am sure to read it over so I know what I'm talking about of course. However, I do not formally write a lesson plan every time and stick to it perfectly. I like to keep things fairly laidback and flexible with each class because I like to have interaction and class discussions because (as other people have said) I don't like just standing up there and talking myself. Plus, I always get the vibe they're not learning anything that way.

As far as methods in presenting material it of course depends on the content, though for each lesson I at least like to have lecture/discussion/notes, video, application (homework) in each lesson. When the content allows it, I like to throw in group activities, something hands-on, or some problem solving.

So I'm pretty laidback teaching wise. Its important for me to maintain a steady procedure every day for the kids and myself (because I'm all scatterbrained and will lose something and mess it all up). I've noticed that I never really lecture the kids about "being responsible" as a lot of the teachers do. I've noticed that I tend to be more focused on "respecting your peers" (note: I never say they need to respect me because I know that needs to be earned) and are they doing what they need in order for them to be successful. Some kids can sit through a class, never take notes, and do fine just by listening and others not so much. I leave that up for them to decide. If they want to sleep, fine by me (note: in teaching HS) -- I figure if I don't give them independence to make their own choices then they never truly learn. They have to learn themselves that if they "stick their hand on the burner its going to hurt" so my hope is that if they chose to put their hand on the burner, they will learn from it and not continue.
That's learning the real-world way... not by somebody lecturing them and nitpicking how they "should not do" things.
 
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