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I'm interested in what your teaching styles are- whether you've had experience in teaching, or even if it's just hypothetical and your post is about how your teaching style would be if you were a teacher. For the sake of discussion, let's say it's a smaller class setting-15-20 students in... a university setting ( just because this way, we don't have to deal with the classroom management stuff that comes along with teaching kids).

how structured or planned would the class be? what type of teaching goals would you have mine? how would your relationship with the students be? how specific would you be in assignments? what kind of students would you like or dislike the most? would you have things decided/planned way in advance or would you be more likely to go along with the flow and see how things fall into place? would you be more laidback or..? how helpful/involved would you be? (<- this is interested, because I noticed that my 'feeler' professors/teachers have a harder time with this. in trying to be helpful, they end up giving away the answers to students who make the effort, but my 'thinker" professors/teachers were more guarded and always tried to NOT give any hint about the answers or would pause before responding to make sure no answer was accidentally revealed).
 

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I teach my cadets naval history ,ship and aircraft recognition, ect and first aid. I use lots of pictures, hands on, lot of repetition and have them follow along. I tend to keep the class going at the rate of the slowest learner so no feels left out. As for structure I would do some lectures followed by pictures, explanation then q&a sessions. As for my small classes I get to know everyone and teach them according to there style of learning. As for student relationship I stay on a personal level unless they don't want it. I keep it entertaining and not dry. I make funny commentary when I emphasize thing like one time I was doing aircraft recognition and I said" if you don't see red white and blue then your screwed." or " Never Ever aim a loaded weapon at your face ! Bullets really hurt." or "when someones hurt heal them first prompt medical transport then laugh when there better."
As for dicipline I make my cadets Stand at attention they lose chair privileges for 3 time offense. I stick to first warnings , 2 is 20 push ups 3 stand at attention for the whole class and if thy move,talk ect more push ups. If the whole class screws around P.T for all. But that's a military style for civilians I say 2 warnings , then seat privileges the. I would be laid back but dicipline sometimes is necissary.
 
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i'd be very inclusive in incorporating all the students into the class. i'd try to encourage a social atmosphere, but when it came to exams i would teach them "tricks of the trade" and the right concepts to understand to pass the exam rather than just bombard them with information.
 

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I like to be VERY VISUAL with all the students! I walk around, use the board, crack jokes, go off on relative tangents, and make the atmosphere as positive and easygoing as possible! When teaching writing, I encourage all students, and help them to really focus on their strengths; make each kid feel like a true artist, scientist, author, superstar, etc. Playing into their self-esteem is part of my teaching; then I see in improvement in participation and this newfound eagerness to learn! I'm not serious unless I have to be: Tests, disruptive behavior, teasing/bullying... that's when I show my angry face. But I also like to make sure EVERY student gets it... even if that means rescheduling and switching around lessons. What's the point of teaching if everyone is left out? Also, I play with my voice; I must be animated and theatrical to hold their attention spans. I have ADD issues myself (naturally, as an ENFP) so I know what will appeal to the students!
 

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As I teach ESL in a classroom setting to pay for my school, I can also contribute here.

I play both Dr.Jekyll AND Mr.Hyde in class. If the students try, and do their work, I am friendly, fun, and class is a good time. However, if the student refuses to do their work or try to learn I turn into a relentless monster (acting) and let them know their life is going to be pretty miserable with extra homework and time spent with me indoors at lunch hour.
 

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From a different perspective...
I am a dance and musical theater teacher so my interactions with my students are very different from academic teachers', though I do tutor math and science.
My relationship with my students is one of challenging them emotionally and physically. I have to show my students what I want but also verbally express how what they are doing is similar or different through both direct comparison and analogy. This is tricky also because I teach children so I have to be aware of what, developmentally, they are actually capable of understanding. Children are great at mimicking, so often this can be easier than it seems but there are some things that are difficult to explain to a child who is not actually capable of understanding some emotions or expressions. Sarcasm is a good example, kids can mimic the tone of your voice but are not actually capable of understanding it until they are about 11 or 12.
I am sure I structure my class as any ENFP teacher does, I walk in with a plan but make it up as I go along.
I think the most difficult thing for me as an ENFP performing arts teacher is that what I am teaching fundamentally requires trust, an emotional connection and, especially teaching dance, that I touch my students. Being an ENFP I am naturally child like and relate to children easily, most especially by treating them with respect and not talking down or underestimating them. Because of these things I always walk a fine line of being teacher/friend.
I develop strong connections with my students, some of whom I have taught for 5 and 7 years. I get to watch them grow as artists from 5 to 14 in some cases, and these connections are part of why I love my job so much. Yet, I always have to be vigilant in maintaining a strict role of teacher, adult and authority figure, which as an ENFP is sometimes difficult.

Thanks for the post about teaching, I enjoyed reading other teachers' responses :)

I know I am not responding so some of your specific questions, but actually, I think the trick of being a good teacher is not in the nitty-gritty. You have to find your best way and admittedly this can be trial and error. The most important thing to know, that I have learned, is that if your students are not understanding you it is YOUR job to find a different way of explaining it. Knowledge is knowing and understanding, but teaching is expressing that knowledge so that someone else can understand it.
 
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