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I'm interested in what your teaching styles are- whether you've had experience in teaching, or even if it's just hypothetical and your post is about how your teaching style would be if you were a teacher. For the sake of discussion, let's say it's a smaller class setting-15-20 students in... a university setting ( just because this way, we don't have to deal with the classroom management stuff that comes along with teaching kids).

how structured or planned would the class be? what type of teaching goals would you have mine? how would your relationship with the students be? how specific would you be in assignments? what kind of students would you like or dislike the most? would you have things decided/planned way in advance or would you be more likely to go along with the flow and see how things fall into place? would you be more laidback or..? how helpful/involved would you be? (<- this is interested, because I noticed that my 'feeler' professors/teachers have a harder time with this. in trying to be helpful, they end up giving away the answers to students who make the effort, but my 'thinker" professors/teachers were more guarded and always tried to NOT give any hint about the answers or would pause before responding to make sure no answer was accidentally revealed).
 

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MOTM May 2011
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I'm interested in what your teaching styles are- whether you've had experience in teaching, or even if it's just hypothetical and your post is about how your teaching style would be if you were a teacher. For the sake of discussion, let's say it's a smaller class setting-15-20 students in... a university setting ( just because this way, we don't have to deal with the classroom management stuff that comes along with teaching kids).

how structured or planned would the class be? what type of teaching goals would you have mine? how would your relationship with the students be? how specific would you be in assignments? what kind of students would you like or dislike the most? would you have things decided/planned way in advance or would you be more likely to go along with the flow and see how things fall into place? would you be more laidback or..? how helpful/involved would you be? (<- this is interested, because I noticed that my 'feeler' professors/teachers have a harder time with this. in trying to be helpful, they end up giving away the answers to students who make the effort, but my 'thinker" professors/teachers were more guarded and always tried to NOT give any hint about the answers or would pause before responding to make sure no answer was accidentally revealed).
Anybody ever tell you that you ask too many questions?:wink: I can't even begin to keep track of them all, much less try to answer them all. I'll give you a synopsis:

I love to teach. I run a tight ship with lots of prep, and I throw myself into it 100%. It's almost like I am on stage, an actor. I do not tolerate any stupid behaviors--I will and have, collected mobile phones from the class and kept them for a couple of days, until I could meet with the parents. (If they are adults, I stop teaching, look at them until the class is all looking at them--then I'll ask if I am interrupting them with my teaching--yes, I've done this.) I spend the time to make sure I'm prepared, so don't be rude.

I love well thought out lesson plans and a guided tour until I unveil the final curtain and the kids eyes all light up with the "AHA!" moment. You can see when they get it--and it is so cool!

I am really about introducing new concepts and ideas, giving concrete data, but then encouraging them to think. If I suspect that some don't know the meaning of the word(s), we stop until we can all explain what is being said in our own words.

My teaching is either OTJ, or it is as part of a volunteer group. Therefore, I teach kids from 10-20 and I teach adults, as well.

It is probably the most rewarding thing that I do. Why don't I teach professionally? Politics. When someone makes a rule that gets in the way of teaching--I go freaking ballistic.:angry: I hate, hate, hate, weak management and weak administrative styles. (Rules for rules sake, type of thinking. If it isn't helping the end product (educated kids) get rid of it.) I'll quit now...making myself mad just thinking about it.:blushed:
 

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I love teaching too. I've been complemented several times by people who say I'd make an excellent teacher because of my patience and teaching styles. What my teaching style is exactly I can't really say, it varies greatly by what I'm teaching and who I'm teaching, but it's always planned ahead, and goes from point to point.

I considered teaching as a career once, because of how people said I was good at it and I the fact that liked it, but then changed my mind because of the 'politics' as niss put it. That and I hate unions.
 
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Just as well you specified the university setting! People tell me that I look like Suzy Cato (the host of several children's shows). Then they tell me that I would make children cry. :unsure:

The class would be super-structured, with a detailed course outline and an agenda at the beginning of each lecture. My teaching goals would be pretty general: to facilitate a learning environment, and enhance students' understanding of the subject matter. Assignments would be fairly specific: short answer rather than essay style.

I delight in teaching people that want to learn... But I have a hard time stopping at just the basics. If it's a topic that I love, say vocal pedagogy, I'll fire endless facts at the poor muppet who asked "so what's the soft palate?".

I would probably be considered fairly unapproachable, although this would be a misconception. And I would provide a general outline of examination expectations and content, possibly with a marking rubric, and reveal no more!
 

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People who would not take my class seriously wouldn't pass. I would teach directly by the book at a fast pace and pop quizzes at the beginning of each class over the previous lecture. The material presented in a structured manner to ensure I hit every point with the required amount of detail. The midterm and final exam would basically be all quizzes combined and reworded to create 50% of their grade, the other 50% being the quizzes. It's hard to skip class and still pass the pop quizzes in the following class unless you care a ton about the material.

I would go out of my way to explain a subject in several ways to fulfill my obligation to the students who haven't caught on to the material.

Study materials would be pre-made such as notes, and they would just be given the task of understanding the concepts. I find it harmful to be too detail oriented on any given subject as it seems to set too high of a standard for students or they may just get lost in the details "missing the forest for the trees" as they say

There would be no extra credit for those who can't afford the normal kind. All tests would be closed book and notes with perhaps a hint on the board if I feel I was too harsh.
 

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I used to feel the same way about tests being closed-book, but I have since changed my mind. In a real-world situation (for instance, at work), a person is never going to know or remember EVERYTHING. IMHO, it's more important that the person have a working knowledge of the subject, and be able to find it when necessary, on short notice, and without taking too long to locate the correct material. I took Marketing last spring, and my professor had the "open-book" mindset for the reasons listed above. BTW, her tests were EXTREMELY hard - just because they were open-book did not make them easy. I usually scored between 88-90 on her tests, even with the book right in front of me!
 

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I used to feel the same way about tests being closed-book, but I have since changed my mind. In a real-world situation (for instance, at work), a person is never going to know or remember EVERYTHING. IMHO, it's more important that the person have a working knowledge of the subject, and be able to find it when necessary, on short notice, and without taking too long to locate the correct material. I took Marketing last spring, and my professor had the "open-book" mindset for the reasons listed above. BTW, her tests were EXTREMELY hard - just because they were open-book did not make them easy. I usually scored between 88-90 on her tests, even with the book right in front of me!
Heavy time restrictions or could you camp out with your book all night?
 

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Heavy time restrictions or could you camp out with your book all night?
Time restrictions. Our tests typically had 40 multiple-guess questions worth 2 points each and 2 essay questions worth 10 points each. The time limit was one hour. The tests usually covered five chapters at once. The essay questions had to be "substantial" in order to receive credit. Most professors (including this one) considered a substantial reply to be 3 paragraphs of 5-7 sentences in each paragraph. It sounds easy, but it is not. An hour is a very slim time window to accomplish the above with a decent score. A student had better already have a good working knowledge of the concepts covered beforehand (which was really the point to begin with).
 

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Time restrictions. Our tests typically had 40 multiple-guess questions worth 2 points each and 2 essay questions worth 10 points each. The time limit was one hour. The tests usually covered five chapters at once. The essay questions had to be "substantial" in order to receive credit. Most professors (including this one) considered a substantial reply to be 3 paragraphs of 5-7 sentences in each paragraph. It sounds easy, but it is not. An hour is a very slim time window to accomplish the above with a decent score. A student had better already have a good working knowledge of the concepts covered beforehand (which was really the point to begin with).
Those tests don't sound fun at all, I don't know where anyone could get easy out of that description. 2 single page essays in 1 hour + 40 multiple choice hard questions. No time to look into the book because you have too much test ahead of you in too little time. That whole opened book thing is just a ploy to give excuse for a harder test.

I guess thats how tough a grad student's courses can become though.
 

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That whole opened book thing is just a ploy to give excuse for a harder test.
Perhaps, but if that's the case, I sucked it up and did it anyway.
I do still believe in the idea of the open-book concept, though, for the real-life reasons I mentioned previously.
 

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Perhaps, but if that's the case, I sucked it up and did it anyway.
I do still believe in the idea of the open-book concept, though, for the real-life reasons I mentioned previously.
You know it or you don't, the book is a advantage for the student who doesn't know enough. I would like to know the the retention rates of those details they had you hunting for through the book during the test.

A few significant details + a ton of concepts is my idea layout for learning. TTYL off to bed
 

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When testing is necessary, overall, I'm an open book, open notes advocate. Multiple guess questions and essay questions would be worded so that if you didn't understand the concepts, then they answer would be tough to come by, but knowing endless data--what's the point? The time restriction eliminates that problem quite nicely.

However, if class size permits, I prefer to interact with the students to be sure that they understand the concepts and material.
 
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Teaching? No thank you. I'm bad at training people. If I tried to teach it would be a disaster. Not to mention I despise public speaking.
 

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Oddly enough, I enjoy training people. I've done it at several jobs in the past, and oddly enough, I'm quite good at it, despite my aversion to public speaking on GP.
 

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I've had little experience with this but I did notice a massive difference in my own training some years ago.

This was motocross training from professional riders and a local hero types. The pro has about 15 riders at a time and we would work at specific technique and then move to another one, things like balance, throttle and clutch control etc. I learned very little from these training sessions, everything I learned I could have simply had my dad explain to me.

I then had one on one lessons after school from a local rider a few years older than me who was fast and was 'cool', I was about 14 and looked up to him, the lessons were 1 hour long after school and only cost $10, he didn't teach me any technique or subtle stuff apart from a new way of shifting gears to speed the shift up. He then hit the track and explained step by step the correct methods to ride that part of the track, he would then give a demo on his bike of the right and wrong ways to do it, as a sensor this was very helpful, we did this over most of the key areas of the race track.

The other and most powerful factor here was the mental side (motocross is a mental game more than anything else) I looked up to this guy and really really wanted to impress and prove myself, this dawned on me when he simply said don't brake into this corner.... so I didn't. I railed the berm ridiculously fast and was kinda in shock and awe that I could do that. Just my wanting to prove myself to the guy I looked up to pushed me harder then ever before.

After 3 1 hour lessons in this setting I went from mid pack C grade to winning the year in A grade. From then on until I was 16 was the best time in my life mentally.

So this is how I would try to teach if I were to do so.
 
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