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I'm interested in what your teaching styles are- whether you've had experience in teaching, or even if it's just hypothetical and your post is about how your teaching style would be if you were a teacher. For the sake of discussion, let's say it's a smaller class setting-15-20 students in... a university setting ( just because this way, we don't have to deal with the classroom management stuff that comes along with teaching kids).

how structured or planned would the class be? what type of teaching goals would you have mine? how would your relationship with the students be? how specific would you be in assignments? what kind of students would you like or dislike the most? would you have things decided/planned way in advance or would you be more likely to go along with the flow and see how things fall into place? would you be more laidback or..? how helpful/involved would you be? (<- this is interested, because I noticed that my 'feeler' professors/teachers have a harder time with this. in trying to be helpful, they end up giving away the answers to students who make the effort, but my 'thinker" professors/teachers were more guarded and always tried to NOT give any hint about the answers or would pause before responding to make sure no answer was accidentally revealed).
 

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Very structured, but I'd try to keep it dramatically interesting.

Extremely engaging with the students - very helpful to those who struggle and rewarding to those who studied hard. Well that's the theory anyway, I know the practice of it can be a little more difficult...

I've a passion for perfection and I'd go to all lengths to ensure my class really outshone the rest of the school haha. Always a competition. :crazy:
 

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I would strongly encourage independent thinking and risk taking. Students who go along with the crowd, or just sit around would fail. Timelines and goals would be adhered to. Instructions would be specific. and you can forget about compromise or extra credit.

Welcome to ENTJ Univeristy. Suck it up!
 

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I'd give three tests over a semester. Homework is optional and plentiful; I'd incentivize doing it by telling the students I'm openly modeling the test questions on the homework questions. The more homework examples the students work through, the better odds they would have on the exams. Working out problems is more important than showing up for lectures; ideally, I'd want the students to take initiative and attempt to work out problems on their own, and then come to class with questions to puzzle out together.

Each lecture would have a goal defined in advance. I'd begin each lecture by examining the general picture, why the subject matter is important, etc., then would cash out everything with greater analysis. This component of the class would finish well ahead of time, so we can utilize the remaining time for working out problems and/or Q&A, depending on if the course is in the sciences or the humanities.

I'd also pass out graded tests in the order of highest grade to lowest, so students have an incentive to strive to be the best and avoid being the worst.
 

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I've taught for 3 years at the secondary level. I don't teach anymore in part because my teaching style is not...shall we say...appreciated by the pansies we are churning out of the system. I frequently told my older colleagues that I wish I could have taught 20 years ago.

I always set long-term goals to be attained...by quarter, semester and year. I enjoyed trying new ideas. I believed that all work should establish a larger understanding and ideally would be used for a tangible final "product." My class was writing-intensive. For my honors classes, I expected advanced work and no excuses.

I changed the lesson plan if something wasn't working for a particular class. I did "what worked." I had students read controversial stories. Organization was a grade.

My students were always worried about the state exams. I told them not to worry, the state exam was way easier than my class. It was true. I had almost perfect passage rates and outstanding honors attainment.

I had no idea, but I terrified a few students....to the point they had to see the counselor!!! It's not like I ever yelled at them. Pansies.
 

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Mine would be structured towards an end-point, not structured in a way on how to achieve that goal. I'd promote open learning, no memorization or routine busy work. It would be all be large project based with lectures each day that would help the student in their project, with presentations, documentation, etc. Lots of team based collaboration and perhaps expert speakers that could come him and provide some helpful insight to the students.

It goes without saying, absolutely no tests, homework, or bullshit assignments - they don't promote learning or any useful skills outside of the classroom. Instead, I would probably have 2 large projects with a presentation and large document as the final deliverables with drafts and minor presentations occuring twice over the semester.

I would promote people to pursue what they enjoy. Its not about content - its about the data gathering, method, analysis, and presentation that would be judged. All assignments would be loosely graded on a rubric.

For example, a project might be something along the lines of: create a car company. I'd go into details everyday of different corporate structures, project lineup techniques, marketing techniques, demographics, etc and I would expect people to pitch full blown company blueprints to me at the end of the semester with the ability to answer questions on everything from their global strategy to their IT infrastructure strategy (on the spot in front of a classroom after a presentation). Hell, I might even have a few car company employers be present for the final presentations. Maybe someone could land an internship.
 

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I've taught for 3 years at the secondary level. I don't teach anymore in part because my teaching style is not...shall we say...appreciated by the pansies we are churning out of the system. I frequently told my older colleagues that I wish I could have taught 20 years ago.

I always set long-term goals to be attained...by quarter, semester and year. I enjoyed trying new ideas. I believed that all work should establish a larger understanding and ideally would be used for a tangible final "product." My class was writing-intensive. For my honors classes, I expected advanced work and no excuses.

I changed the lesson plan if something wasn't working for a particular class. I did "what worked." I had students read controversial stories. Organization was a grade.

My students were always worried about the state exams. I told them not to worry, the state exam was way easier than my class. It was true. I had almost perfect passage rates and outstanding honors attainment.

I had no idea, but I terrified a few students....to the point they had to see the counselor!!! It's not like I ever yelled at them. Pansies.

Pansies, aint that the truth. I had one teacher in college, who I adored, and which I thrived in. We had 500 pages of reading a week, weekly quizzes, and 30 page take home exams. In the week before graduation, while the other seniors were goofing off, I was finishing a paper on Kennedys press policies during the Vietnam war. ( FYI he was no saint). Gosh those were the good ole days
 
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