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Hey everyone!

So, I'm currently stuck in high school, surrounded by humans whom I don't particularly want to associate myself with. High school seems to be a bit of a struggle for me socially, and in some subjects academically. Surprisingly, mathematics is the subject I struggle with most, although I thrive in science (mainly chemistry and physics), and also in visual arts and multimedia. I find most of my subjects boring and uninteresting, and I have trouble concentrating on what is, apparently, "Important".

The thing is, I love, appreciate, and cherish learning and education, it's the whole concept of school itself that I'm not fond of.

I'm very interested in hearing some other opinions on this topic; what was your overall experience like, did you struggle socially/academically, what was your favourite subject, were your teachers influential in your learning?

I'd also be interested in ideas focusing on how to deal and cope with high school in general, fellow students, teachers, and lack of concentration and interest.

Thanks a lot, I appreciate your opinions,
 

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I am the last person to give advice. I did not take High School seriously at all. I just did the things required of me to pass the exams. I focused my energy on other things, learned whatever I wanted to learn but outside of the structured institution often labeled education. I am a true autodidact and you can't constrain me. I turned out alright, but I would not advice people to do like I did, though. Because you never know, society wants good grades. I like all subjects and hate all subjects, because it all depends on my mood and curiosity.
 

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I convinced my parents to home school me. We set up a loose curriculum of very little math and lots of science and english(which was basically me just sitting and writing for five to ten hours a day). Unfortunately most kids aren't as lucky as me, so I don't know what to tell you.
 

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Towards the end I started to find it tedious and pointless. My school had an absentee policy of automatic failure for seven or more absences in a quarter. I'd show up, take a test on Friday or whatever and was failing courses with grades in the 90's. I can remember one teacher that based half your grade on your notebook...mine was full of doodles and even though I aced all the tests she still failed me. I failed gym. :laughing: Senior year I took a night course in creative writing to make up the last credit I needed. I remember my senior guidance counsellor trying to talk me out of it. 'This might be too much for you...sports lit might be a better choice'...my freshman guidance counsellor happened to be passing by and overheard this being said to me and butted in 'Are you kidding me?!' Bless her heart.

I ended up barely graduating and didn't attend the ceremony much to my mother's disappointment. Two weeks later the school called and some irritated bureaucrat wanted to know if I was ever planning on picking up my diploma. I sent my kid brother down on his bike to grab it for me. It's a good thing I did this because later when I was incarcerated in a juvenile detention facility there were mandatory remedial education classes. When I pointed out what a waste of my time this was, having already graduated high school, they demanded proof. My parents brought in the diploma, the counsellor/guards (whatever you want to call them...some were thugs, some pedophiles, some were actually well meaning souls) hung it prominently behind the glass of the access cage for all to see and told me I could read instead of attending 'What's a noun?' class. This was intended to inspire the other kids. Im pretty sure I needed it a few years back to to take a CDL course at a community college as well.

I'm 47 now. My mother is no longer disappointed in me. Quite the opposite. I have no idea what any of my fellow students are up to nowadays with the exception of Adam Sandler. Cannery Row is still a favorite read and I may not have discovered it on my own but beyond this I don't credit much to the experience. My best advice to you: This too shall pass.
 

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Coasted, coasted, coasted some more. Dropped out. Got my GED early.
I never really learned how to study, which made university a bit of a pain at first (being a procrastinating INTP didn't help either).

I didn't struggle socially (not in high school; junior high was a different story).
My favorite subject was History, but I can't say that I learned much in school. I've always been an autodidact.
 

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High school wasn't that bad for me, although it might differ from the (I'm assuming) american high school experience. I kept to myself, although I did meet a few nice people I still stay in touch with today. Mostly I just spent my time daydreaming, and being generally lackadaisical. I sure as hell never studied anything but I still managed to get good grades somehow. I don't really have a lot to share as there isn't anything really memorable about my time in high school. I guess I was just bored out of my mind.
 

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I just finished high school a month ago, and my experience wasn't that bad, although it could have been better. I spent almost all classes daydreaming or playing/surfing the internet with my smartphone. In most subjects I had to ask other students the units we had studied because I didn't even know that. My grades were not bad (8/10). I skipped many classes, specially English (as a second language). I've never failed any subject (yet).
I never got less than a 9/10 in a math test, though, and I paid so much attention I didn't even have to study at home. I also liked listening to the history teacher, but learning every detail and date bored me to death. I always got a 10 in English.

Socially, it was not that bad either. Statistically, if there are 30 people in a class, some of them will be worth it. You can always troll people/play with your smartphone/think if you're bored

Next year I'm starting university and I'm scared to death because I've not learned to study yet, and I'm worried it might be too late.
 

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I've spent most of it with depression, but it turns out that the depression was caused largely by narcolepsy.

I only struggled when I was dead tired from getting funky (narcolepsy) sleep. I still have a high gpa though.

I'm only a rising junior. I dislike interacting with most people, and my high school barely produces any sense of "togetherness." I have a few friends, but I see them so infrequently that I feel isolated most of the time.
I like to just read ahead in the textbook and make teachers like me so that if I'm in a pinch, they'll give me some leeway.
I actually like almost all subjects, except for social studies. I think that history is important though.
 

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As I'm approaching the last two years I am lacking complacently. In terms of work I had to be the star student and get everything done perfectly.
Kindergarten-5th grade: I would easily comprehend and understand the information. I always started large projects the day before the due date.
6th-8th grade: I found the material easy and I focused on classwork. As homework increased I learned to do it during lunch periods and immediately after I arrived home. I waited until the day before the day before the project due date in case I needed materials.
9th grade: Living Environmemt as it is called instead of Biology, is the most complicated class I have ever taken. My grades were in the mid-upper 80s ending my streak of all 90s or above. At this time I did nearly all of my homework in school and did projects within a week after receiving them.
10th grade: here I downgraded to basic level Earth Science just to make my life easier. But this time my math teacher was not engaging whatsoever. Originally I said off to the side of the room where I could just go ahead and do all the problems then I was moved directly in the middle of the room where I was constantly distracted by the chaotic students. I grew arrogant and lazy like the others and I did virtually no work during the last months of geometry, I started filling in random answers just to say "it's done". That was an exceptionally bad class but it really got me more into the thought of "why am I even doing this?" So my performance is predicted to drop unless I get a real engaging set of teachers. At this time I did all of my homework at school and work stay after school just to see my friends, previously I would just walk home without that.
So if I were to graph this my performance met it's peak at 9th grade, then it wobbled down because of laziness and social interaction. It was last year or the year before that when I got my iPhone and I started joining social media. That throws everything off. I used to have no distractions as a kid.
 

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As @DarkBarlow says, it will pass.

It's sounds like cold comfort now but try keep it in the back of your mind. You will never, after your highschool years, feel such intensity in everyday life as you do now. Now, when someone says they like me or consider me a friend, I'm touched and pleased. Back then it was like they had earned my eternal gratitude and I would go to the grave for them. Same now if I accidentally overhear an unflattering comment about me. I might be surprised that these people think that way, wonder what I did to cause such an impression and consider whether I could be bothered to try and correct it. If it had happened to me at say 14/15, the sense of betrayal would be crushing and the black gloom of despair of never belonging anywhere would settle in. Its embarrassing admitting all this so I won't continue- just to say that soon the intensity, driven by biology and evolutionary factors, dulls a little bit by bit. You start getting breathing spaces between the bursts, where it seems like you're finally getting the hang of things. Even INTPs are not immune to biology.

Personally, high school was a revelation for me and I was given access to astonishing amounts of information. These were pre-google days. Having a large-ish academic library and teachers who were not only fine about answering questions, but would actually ask interesting questions and put forward radical theories was the most amazing thing that had ever happened to me up until then. Finally I was put into an academic program that challenged me so I wasn't as bored as before. Other than that it was the normal social awkwardness that I always had and probably always will have. (Maths wasn't great for me either- I put it down to changing schools too often and missing important bits. That's probably just a lame excuse, though, and another example of being lazy with things that needed a little bit of work). On a practical note, in my 2nd last year I 'dated' (it was really innocent) the school thug (a delinquent who already had links with adult gangs). Its a long story with a lot of dubious rationales but was effective at keeping everyone else at arm's length even after he dumped me and failed out. I don't know if I would recommend it as a solution.

I now think that high school can be particularly challenging for INTPs due to social ineptitude, dislike for authority/ hierarchy and inconsistent drive. If you are a really clued-in INTP you might recognise this and try to start working to improve these areas. If you're like me- people are a bunch of irrational idiots, f**k da police and they can shove their corporate ladder, materialistic, money-grubbing lifestyles up their jacksies. Some things never change.
 

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I rally can't help you \, i'm in high school right now and i slowly see my grades depleating and me just caring less... like its just not worth it, it sucks because im scared since i want to go to a good college, but i don't know. I have a question for older intp's does going to a 'good' colledge really matter? I have high expectations for myself and am strongly relying on my SAT'S to fill my grade lazyness. Good post this is a problem I seriously think all intp's go through.
 

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Videregående is great so far, I just finished my first year.
- people are very nice here
- I don't think anyone is being bullied (maybe someone is, but it's not the visible kind at least)
- we have much more freedom than we had in Ungdomsskolen, so people don't complain as much
- we got to choose studies/vocational, so the people I ended up with are more intelligent
- if we finish all three/four years, we get to keep the laptop we got, for free (if we don't finish we have to pay, but it's still cheaper than if we just bought it)
- all the subjects are better/more interesting than they were in ungdomsskolen, and we have new subjects too
- I can sit alone without anyone thinking it's weird or saying anything about it, but I can also sit with my friends if I want to talk
 

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Alright here is my highschool experience in a nutshell:

In high school I was exposed to mbti, and that was probably the more pivotal learning experience I had at the time.

I had good teachers, and some eh, I'm never one to really hate teachers.Tthe teachers weren't really the problem so much as the hundreds of student they had to get to know and generalize everything down for. I felt like I didn't really exist or matter, I was just another body. It was very hands offish, the teachers had the capability to do more than they actually did, so they seemed like they weren't exactly intelligent in a way I could appreciate or emulate. A few kind of were though. But like I said it was hands offish, everything was based on homework, and I got the impression that a lot of their homework was more of the student's parents doing because they didn't act like they understood very much. Which also seems to self select to the more affluent families.

Most of my highschool experience was music, I was in band. I also took my piano lessons at the time very seriously. I was in orchestra for a short period of time too, but I left it - it just wasn't doing anything for me like it use to. I really didn't even think much about school work - not like it would matter if I did anyway. Band was a huge distraction for me because it was made up of sensors, and I think the band director was a damaged ISFJ. He is probably the only teacher I ever can legitimately say I didn't like. Not that sensors are bad whatsoever, I guess I just mean it was very "anti N". Basically you were always deemed as a better person if you can hold on to the ridiculous amount of shit they give you.... you can imagine how difficult this was for me. It was suppose to be about the music but it wasn't. I really should have left it from the beginning, but a part of me felt like I was so undesigned for this environment it would probably be useful for my future to know what it means to adapt to the worst possible environment. And it also felt like they wanted me to leave. I pretty much feel like I can deal with anything now if I had to. Also, I originally joined as a way to not have to take PE. Not that I don't like physical activity in PE, I just didn't want to have to be forced to participate in running when I actually didn't want to. idk I probably could have dealt with it, the decision was made on a whim and I stuck with it. It backfired because there was no such thing as freedom in band.

I somehow took in information without trying, I didn't even know where I was or why I was there half of the time. I would usually do decently on tests, but with doing practically NO work. I DON'T RECOMMEND THIS - LEARN EARLY HOW TO GET YOUR WORK DONE AGAINST YOUR WILL... or something like that. I remember once in my algebra 2 class when I looked at the chart at the end of the year I had the lowest grade in the class but got the highest grade on the final - didn't even study for it whatsoever, I was reading a fantasy book in class the whole time that year - which only served to further an ego which was already warped due to the whole band experience, and justified my doing no work so... yeah just thought of the whole thing as a joke. I probably could have learned high school in one book I that I could go over for a few months. But when it comes to this, my school was especially strange. Probably if I had taken AP classes I would have been happier. I wasn't even allowed to attempt it though, even when I asked to just take the test, the teacher literally said to me she feared I would pass it and it could potentially turn into an argument with the department finally leaning in my favor - they would have had no choice but to accept me if I passed. Of course she could have just been making me feel better, but when I remember how poorly people could formulate sentences in writing or convey an interesting idea whatsoever, I actually think she was being honest. Although I've always been long winded with my sentences, so perhaps I was just on the other end of bad writing. She said it angrily anyway. Not to mention when I took a reading comprehension level test in freshman year everyone tested at around 9 or 7, some lower, some 11's, and I got 13+. The plus standing for they lost track after grade 13. One other kid got it too. Of course these are scores and they only say so much, but for someone who barely did anything.... it just made me feel like I was abused for being capable instead of a participant.

So yeah I hold a lot of animosity towards the experience, but it was 4 years and it's over and done with. It's becoming less and less of a blip when it comes to what matters in life. And of course english were the classes I did the worst in, but it was mainly because I thought it was the easiest and I didn't care about it. It was sadly laughable when the english teacher would try to carry on an in depth conversation about a story and everyone would just be sitting around either acting like they don't give a shit or having blank stares like they don't understand what she is trying to imply.

Oh yeah, and throw in the fact that I was pretty much in love with a girl I did not know or understand how to approach which only served as a major distraction.

Best advice, as an INTP go to the library and learn stuff on your own. You will learn it better.
 
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It was terrible for me (especially the first years) because I tried to fit in and become part of a group. Didn't really work. The best year was my last year because I spent the lunch hour in the school library, reading. That was very nice.

Most of the subjects were really easy...I didn't like any of them except for Psychology though. That was a super easy class. It was mostly a lot of terms to memorize.

I had one math teacher that was so boring I could not concentrate at all on what she was saying...which is why I got some bad quiz and test grades in that class that brought my overall grade down. I probably could've read the textbook but I was too lazy.

I rarely ever studied. As long as your classwork/project/homework grades are good enough, the test scores don't have to be very high...I still got mostly As and Bs.

It is easier to just not worry about social groups or talking to people. Being forced to talk to other people is a problem you can't really avoid though.

You don't have to pay much attention in class. Most of the time, you can just read the textbook to figure out what's going on.

AP and honors classes are where the smarter people are, so if you can take those classes. Some of them have a lot of homework though...watch out for those.

I hated the classwork and homework. The thing I hated the most, though, was getting up at 6 a.m. every morning. I tend to stay up late and getting up in the morning was torture. I took naps sometimes when I got home. Those helped.

You might be able to skip your graduation and just get your diploma in the mail/at school. That's what I did. It's highly recommended that you skip it since it will be the most boring x hours of your life.

This website might be able to help. Use ctrl+F to find where it says "How to Daydream Without Suffering For It".INTPs and ADD | Oddly Developed Types
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
High school wasn't that bad for me, although it might differ from the (I'm assuming) american high school experience. I kept to myself, although I did meet a few nice people I still stay in touch with today. Mostly I just spent my time daydreaming, and being generally lackadaisical. I sure as hell never studied anything but I still managed to get good grades somehow. I don't really have a lot to share as there isn't anything really memorable about my time in high school. I guess I was just bored out of my mind.
It may be a different experience, I'm actually an Australian student and I'm aware that there are actually quite a lot of differences in our education system (for example, "middle school" isn't really a thing here, our high school starts in grade 7, and finishes in grade 12).

I'm also the same - I rarely study, only if I am completely and utterly interested in whatever subject/topic it is (which is, as I said before, very rare), yet I still manage to achieve great results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
As @DarkBarlow says, it will pass.
It's sounds like cold comfort now but try keep it in the back of your mind. You will never, after your highschool years, feel such intensity in everyday life as you do now.

Finally I was put into an academic program that challenged me so I wasn't as bored as before. Other than that it was the normal social awkwardness that I always had and probably always will have. (Maths wasn't great for me either- I put it down to changing schools too often and missing important bits. That's probably just a lame excuse, though, and another example of being lazy with things that needed a little bit of work).

I now think that high school can be particularly challenging for INTPs due to social ineptitude, dislike for authority/ hierarchy and inconsistent drive. If you are a really clued-in INTP you might recognise this and try to start working to improve these areas.
To me that's definitely not cold comfort, I appreciate it a lot, because it gives me something to think about whilst I'm finishing my two years left of school. It's kind of 'the light at the end of the tunnel' to know that I won't always be stuck in the situation I am in now, so thank you!

If only if only. Although I go to a private girls school, there aren't really any academic programs at all that my school offers, which really frustrates me. And I completely agree with you on the whole maths topic, my excuse is that my teacher is incredibly introverted, and when he is solving an equation on the board he kind of mumbles to himself and leaves out a lot of the important information. One other thing I struggle with is that he doesn't ever explain the logic and reasoning behind why he does what he does. Can someone really expect an INTP to just accept it and use a formula without knowing why or how it works? It comes down to missing out on certain bits and pieces of the work, and because I don't know any of the further information because I missed a complete step, I subconsciously tune out.

Again, I agree with you. I have tried to start to improve these areas, but it's a seemingly long and slow process. Thank you for your advice.
 

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I hated myself, abhorred social interaction, and eventually chose to be home-schooled.

It sucked for a few reasons, but the most livid was being conventionally attractive for once in my life (I was a chubby kid, and my mother sent me to fatcamp right before high-school), but still feeling like shit, and still having people make fun of me/try to intimidate me.

I let down friends, made enemies, and never did homework.

Typical INTP shit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Also, I originally joined as a way to not have to take PE. Not that I don't like physical activity in PE, I just didn't want to have to be forced to participate in running when I actually didn't want to. idk I probably could have dealt with it, the decision was made on a whim and I stuck with it. It backfired because there was no such thing as freedom in band.

I somehow took in information without trying, I didn't even know where I was or why I was there half of the time. I would usually do decently on tests, but with doing practically NO work. I DON'T RECOMMEND THIS - LEARN EARLY HOW TO GET YOUR WORK DONE AGAINST YOUR WILL... or something like that.

Best advice, as an INTP go to the library and learn stuff on your own. You will learn it better.
My PE teachers are horrendous. As you've said, I have no problem with the physical exercise itself, it was the fact that there is someone there ordering me around and telling me what to do for a complete 50 minute period.

I know you say you don't recommend this, but it's a bit too late for that, even in primary school I was like that. There are always a few classmates that envy my results because I put incredibly little effort in. It's quite ironic actually, because they spend the whole two-week period before the exam studying and writing notes and blah blah blah, and here I am turning up to class with a single pen ready for my exam, getting minimal sleep the night before, and I still manage to get better results than them. I'm the same with assignments, I generally do them the night before, although I am improving on this and have even handed in a few assignments early (I know right).

And as much as I would love to hideaway in the library at lunch and recess, as I have tried before, there is always someone in my 'group' of friends (and a large one at that, I have one other INTP friend, and she's brilliant - definitely my closest friend, but most of the others are extraverts) that will follow me, expecting conversation. It is very frustrating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
It is easier to just not worry about social groups or talking to people. Being forced to talk to other people is a problem you can't really avoid though.

AP and honors classes are where the smarter people are, so if you can take those classes. Some of them have a lot of homework though...watch out for those.

This website might be able to help. Use ctrl+F to find where it says "How to Daydream Without Suffering For It".
I wish I could not worry about social groups, but it seems incredibly hard to avoid in my particular school. I guess it's good in a way for some people, because as soon as the staff see you alone or by yourself the actively try and help and make friends for you. Although that's really only helpful to the people who don't want to be alone. I do have a group of friends, although it is large, and one of the girls in that group is an INTP; we get along brilliantly to say the least. I've dug myself way too deep in this group of people to avoid them now. Damn my young immature-wanting-to-fit-in self.

How I would love to take an AP class... They are not offered in Australian schools, unfortunately. The closest thing to an AP class is our single accelerant chemistry class, which I was in when I was in grade 8, but because the class was two people too big, the teacher had to drop two students, me being one of them. Her reasoning was because, "even though I get good marks, I don't put in as much effort as the other girls". So that was annoying.

And yes, I have already looked through that site. I found it interesting and helpful, but I haven't read it in a while, so I might have a quick look at it again, thank you and I appreciate your help!
 
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