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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
My god. Who would have thunk it!

I think that this equation involves calculus. Calculus... the course I didn't study for and got a C in! Ha!

Well, well. It involves calculus because we are basically saying that slope "grade points/hour" changes.

Oh god... but I must find a way to work in the "base".

Oh. Got it.

Y axis = over all grade
x axis = hours studying

Yet... some people get to start off at a certain point based on "their natural ability/ hardness". It's almost like they did hours of studying!

Of course... then I wonder if smart students and dumb students pick things up at the same speed. Maybe they both need different graphs. A million different graphs! Another thing is telling me that I ought to do something with the third dimension... that crazy z axis... but what?
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
I feel as though I've taken a step to make this equation more elegant, but at the same time I feel a little disappointed that I have. When it was all jumbled it looked so complex! I imagined showing my calculus teacher... she never liked me... "look at me now!" I guess it just appears to be a simple equation whose slope is constantly changing.
 

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Maybe it can get MORE elegant... I don't like how that "base" thing just hangs out there... a separate part of it...
Elegance is secondary to function. In integral calculus every single solution will have an arbitrary constant C at the end of the equation.

I like one of the equations you came up with. y = (x/kc) + (c/k) I think this is a pretty accurate model of the phenomena now that I come back to it. I say we stick with this one. Oh and don't worry about trying to do something with the third dimension. If you change y to f(x, k, c), you have a four dimensional function already. Don't try and make it more complicated.

Now, how about you start studying? You know you want to.
 

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The base is called a boundary condition. You set it by putting what you get without studying. In my precal class, I teach about variation, showing how things can vary directly or inversely with variables. Complexity can come out of simplicity. For example, your grade in any given class often depends on how well/hard the other students in the class work, since your grade is relative to theirs. Then there's input from the teacher. Is the teacher good? Hard grader? Soft on deadlines or a hardass? You could imagine all the students in the class as a sort of interacting system of particles with the teacher as an externally imposed temperature like an Ising model:

Try playing with the temperature on this one:
Ising Model Main Page

See how the areas of positive and negative magnetization are random at high temperatures, but at lower temperatures (below a critical temperature) they form into islands of north and south polarized magnetization. So if your teacher is very cold, the class will form into cliques of pro and anti teacher groups. If the teacher is very hot, then there will be a lot of random fluctuation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
absentminded, I'm really going to have to disagree with you. y = (x/kc) + (c/k) is NOT right. It says that a student who is smart gains less than a student who is dumb, NO MATTER WHERE THEY START OUT. So a dumb student and a smart student can study for the same amount of time, and the dumb student can get a higher score (as was demonstrated in my first or second post).
 

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Discussion Starter · #88 ·
Whytiger, the toughness of the teacher/class overall was to be determined by the constant, "k", which changes for each class. Of course, there is going to be some work in determining what constant k IS and how it is built.

Our first question:

is the class graded on a curve?

I prefer no, because I have never been in a curve graded class and it just makes things more complicated.


As for the Ising Model...
1. Is this... related to magnetism? I remember from physics class, that the reason that running an electric current in a wire around a piece of iron makes the iron magnetized is because the electrons in the iron start to spin in perfect synchronization. Does this tie into it?

2. As for relating the Ising model to the learning model...

a) Is a student a specific POINT in the Ising Model? As in, "Jimmy is 2 inches to the right and 5 inches up from the (imaginary) xy axis AT ALL TIMES. Sometimes he turns green and sometimes he turns red, but that point is always Jimmy."

b) Aren't the shapes that the Ising model makes totally irrelevant, then? 20 greens in the shape of a heart surrounded by a perfect sea of 40 reds is no different from 20 greens and 40 reds scattered together (so long as neither model has a different switch around speed)
 

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Ok, yes, the k is good too. That's sort of an average measurement. I mentioned the Ising model because you said you wanted complexity.

Yes, exactly. Think of each dot as a tiny magnet. It can have its north pole pointing up or its south pole up. If you have two dots that are next to each other, but opposite, then they cancel each other out because the north of the one dot will attract souths to it but the south of the other dot will attract norths and repel souths. The effect is that they are neutral to objects that are far enough away. When the temperature is high, the dots are random so the material as a whole has no overall magnetism. This is what happens if you put a magnet in an oven. It loses its magnetism.

Now, when you get a whole bunch of dots pointing in the same direction you get a magnetized region. That large area is going to behave like one big magnet, so if you bring something close enough you will notice that it is magnetized. The larger the region, the more effect it has. The idea is that, when you cool the magnet enough, it can form these large regions and, if you want a good strong magnet, ideally you would have just two regions, a north region and a south region.

The Ising model is a simple model for magnetism that says that dots that are next to each other prefer to point in the same direction. The temperature adds an element of randomness though. As you lower the temperature past a critical point, the model goes through a phase transition, similar to freezing, and tends to form regions rather than being random.

I sort of imagined that the dots would be students and that the would tend to agree with their neighbors, just like the dots in the Ising model. If they are ENTP's though, we might need a new rule that they prefer to disagree with their neighbors!

It doesn't really matter who the specific students are if they all behave the same. That is a simplification. We're imagining an average student here.
 

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Sooooo, we've spent more time trying to understand a metaphorical, hypothetical equation, than actually studying? I think you and at least two other people in this thread have ADD.

The Waffle, Sellihca, Kr3m1in, Emerson, Kristle, and myself all gave solid and REALISTIC advice, aaaannnnnd the situation has not progressed. At all. Trying to help you is like shoveling shit against the tide. Seriously, get an Rx for the ADD, no one here can help you.
 

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Sooooo, we've spent more time trying to understand a metaphorical, hypothetical equation, than actually studying? I think you and at least two other people in this thread have ADD.

The Waffle, Sellihca, Kr3m1in, Emerson, Kristle, and myself all gave solid and REALISTIC advice, aaaannnnnd the situation has not progressed. At all. Trying to help you is like shoveling shit against the tide. Seriously, get an Rx for the ADD, no one here can help you.
Well, the Ising model is physics, so maybe it will jog her into studying physics she's supposed to be learning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #92 ·
Sooooo, we've spent more time trying to understand a metaphorical, hypothetical equation, than actually studying? I think you and at least two other people in this thread have ADD.

The Waffle, Sellihca, Kr3m1in, Emerson, Kristle, and myself all gave solid and REALISTIC advice, aaaannnnnd the situation has not progressed. At all. Trying to help you is like shoveling shit against the tide. Seriously, get an Rx for the ADD, no one here can help you.
Perhaps I never asked for advice and find the "metaphorical, hypothetical equation" quite interesting.

I do not need an Rx for ADHD. Yeah, there is an H in there.

Fuck you.

Besides, how would you even know if the situation has progressed? You never asked me how the studying was going. Anyways, it's not like -- wait, what was your advice, anyways? Study? Was that it? Just study? Gee thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #93 ·
If you don't think studying is important now, I've got news for you, you're in for a rude awakening next year at college cowgirl.

I hate studying. It's a necessity in college classes. You are going to have to do it. Not only that, but you are going to encounter more classes you aren't so enamored with, and consequently, won't do well at. So it goes.

Now, back in high school it was a different story. The courses were easier

I tried this my freshman year of college. I got my ass kicked. I found out the hard way, and so will you.
Okay... you have to study in college. College is harder than high school.
 

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Discussion Starter · #94 ·
The whole point of this thread was to decide whether or not I should study. You seem to say yes, but ultimately, any action is driven by emotion. The more people describe the realities of college life contrasted with the easy ways of high school, the more I begin to EMOTIONALLY accept that studying may be a reality. This is a "tipping the scales" scenario. I would like to see some people in a college studying... people that I know, who are in the same classes with me. That might make it more real. I want to figure out if this is THE NORM. If it is, then I'll do it.
 

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Incompetent is pretty much the worst feeling I can have. When I feel incompetent I get restless and pissed off. Then if it lasts too long without me having been able to fix it, depressed. Then after too long, I get pissed off and restless enough again to do whatever it takes to fix it.
 

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Play while studying. Stress is the worst motivator for good marks.
 

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I'm a woman... by the way... so my post about gender having something to do with it... not sexist.
Well, I am female, never struggled with physics. Gender is not an issue. How one was brought up (in matters of aspirations and learning) has to; along with one's way & ability of learning, has to do much though.

Oh, you dirty NTJs!
Is THIS how all the other people in my class seem so competent?
No. Iam xNTJ. And since I am a J, a subject HAS TO have a meaning and to make sense. Random unrelated, unprocessed info doesn't stick much to my mind either. Though I possess a strange memory, everything is always meaningful/related in some way, even if I have to create that myself. Rote alone, nothing sticks to my mind.
Quoting from wiki:
Rote learning vs. critical thinking
"Critical Thinking" ^ Iirc all NTs (including you) are supposed to do that. Right? If yes, I don't see why we should go ROTE instead of BRAIN ^^

Rote learning is sometimes disparaged with the derogative terms parrot fashion
Is exactly how we refer to it in my country (that happens to be one of the countries using it extensively). We frown down to it (but sure helps grades...).

So, it would be real helpful if you were more specific about what exactly is this physics class. Mechanics? Relativity? Electromagnetism? Nuclear physics? Solid states? Astro? Optical? Thermodynamics? I think you said you are still in high school so you should be doing all that already. If you mentioned it already, I must have missed it.
Tell us the exact branch of physics that gives you the hard time so we can help. Add the level of maths you are using in it. Merely algebra? Calculus? Derivatives & integrals for sure; right?

You were already been given good advice, let's see if we can find a seemingly new one that will float your boat and switch your view on the subject of that class.
 
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