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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A. The inability to understand things without examples or illustrations, so I can translate it into my own "mind language". (I need to at least create several diagrams in my mind to properly understand something.)

B. Mulling over something when the answer suddenly flies into my face, which I test several times to make sure that it is correct.

C. Incoherence; inability to express self with mere words.

D. Intuitive knowledge of what will occur after a certain sequence of events have occurred, without being able to explain how or why.

E. Little or no sense of reality.
 

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Ok, I'm in no way an expert on functions so please correct me if I'm wrong. But as far as I understand the functions these are my guesses:

A. The inability to understand things without examples or illustrations, so I can translate it into my own "mind language". (I need to at least create several diagrams in my mind to properly understand something.)
I'm not sure, but can relate to it personally. I've seen it being associated with Ne. But I feel more comfortable with putting it as Se as it depends on concrete information rather than abstract concepts.

B. Mulling over something when the answer suddenly flies into my face, which I test several times to make sure that it is correct.
Looks like a combination of Ni (intuitively understanding things) and Te (relying on external, repeatable facts).

C. Incoherence; inability to express self with mere words.
I don't see how those two things fit together. I'd depict the second as an F trait, most likely Fi. I don't really know the context in which incoherence is displayed so this makes it hard for me to decide where to put it.

D. Intuitive knowledge of what will occur after a certain sequence of events have occurred, without being able to explain how or why.
Ni: intuitively picking up patterns in events
could also involve Si: judging from the past ("after a certain sequence of events")

E. Little or no sense of reality.
If you mean an idealistic, dreamer-like attitude then my guess is any dom/aux combination of N and F.

I'm looking forward to seeing how other people define them. :happy:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok, I'm in no way an expert on functions so please correct me if I'm wrong. But as far as I understand the functions these are my guesses:


I'm not sure, but can relate to it personally. I've seen it being associated with Ne. But I feel more comfortable with putting it as Se as it depends on concrete information rather than abstract concepts.


Looks like a combination of Ni (intuitively understanding things) and Te (relying on external, repeatable facts).


I don't see how those two things fit together. I'd depict the second as an F trait, most likely Fi. I don't really know the context in which incoherence is displayed so this makes it hard for me to decide where to put it.


Ni: intuitively picking up patterns in events
could also involve Si: judging from the past ("after a certain sequence of events")


If you mean an idealistic, dreamer-like attitude then my guess is any dom/aux combination of N and F.

I'm looking forward to seeing how other people define them. :happy:
A. Incorrect. Se is about taking in information in its raw, pure form. I must communicate abstract information through examples with a commentary in my own mental symbols (each of which contain a large amount of data and understanding). In my mind, it's abstract information in its purest form. Probably Ne.

B. Probably only Ni. I forgot to mention that I only perform mental simulations of experiments.

C. Probably lack of Ti. I meant expressing ideas and concepts.

D. No. Not Si. For example, I'm creating a dish that I have never created before, but I have individually tasted the ingredients. I can imagine the outcome simply by looking at the list of ingredients and how it was cooked. It's the trait of Ne, I believe.

E. Probably just N. it's not idealistic, dreamer-like attitude, but more like "being lost in your own world were no one else can come and everyday rules don't apply."
 

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That moment when you invest time and energy to answer a question with the sincere desire to help and the first word you hear in response is "incorrect"... Gotta love INTJs! :laughing:
Seriously! If the OP believes she has the answers, why ask others in the first place?

*leaves thread because uninterested in investing energy in such an irritating environment*
 

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A. The inability to understand things without examples or illustrations, so I can translate it into my own "mind language". (I need to at least create several diagrams in my mind to properly understand something.)

B. Mulling over something when the answer suddenly flies into my face, which I test several times to make sure that it is correct.

C. Incoherence; inability to express self with mere words.

D. Intuitive knowledge of what will occur after a certain sequence of events have occurred, without being able to explain how or why.

E. Little or no sense of reality.
A. Cognitive functions are used to find solutions, or alternatives. They're logical. Each function can make use of provided images, but does not require them in order to go about solving a problem. Not having an image to use, for instance, is a problem cognitive functions would do their best to solve. Ni might ask 'what could that be like?' Fi might ask 'using these circumstances I'm familiar with, perhaps this would happen?' Se might ask 'I, and others, would probably experience that, so maybe this would occur?' And so on.

I think it's inexclusive to cognitive functions, and depends on another strength.

B. I'm thinking either S or N, the perceiving functions. It might 'consciously' occur more often to preferrers of Intuition who cross-analyze objects regularly. Sensation uses memory a lot, and Intuition uses foresight. Each has its unique ways of instantaneously conjuring something by experiencing something else. However, I think it'd be the Judging functions, T or F, that would test, or make sense of ideas.

C. That...might be something more subconscious, or more relative to common inexperience. When one can't express something [well] using words, it suggests a lack of understanding. It takes time. Typically, when imagining what something could be like, one would use Intuition. When determining the usefulness, or sensation (positive or negative) of something, Sensation is invoked. F and T consider how reality should, or shouldn't, be conducted, so this is less related to them outside of organizing an experience, making sense of it.

D. Foresight, as an ability, is generally a result Intuition, but one's whole process is necessary to make a hypothesis (Ni-Fe-Ti-Se, or Si-Fe-Ti-Ne).

It's said Intuition can't explain how it reaches certain conclusions, but it knows as much about it as Sensation does. Intuition is just forgetful. I'll explain:

In a precisive manner Intuition and Sensation retain contexts of events and details, as well as how they 'fit' alongside other events and details they've retained. Intuition will integrate the possible to guess at what else could be possible. They won't always know their process because the goal is the new idea, not the ideas used to produce the new idea.

Sensation integrates memories to recognize what's most associated with them, thereby focusing on what is currently affecting them, not anything unknown, or risky. S and N both use relevance to enmesh old and new ideas. S and N preferrers are aware of this. Since Intuition focuses more on the new, it uses the old and immediately sets it aside, only forgetting what it had used.

E. Being psychotic (as in psychosis), "spoiled" and/or sheltered, and possessing a lack of socialization history are the best ways of accomplishing this phenomenon. Each MBTI type, on average, has the same basic awareness of the world around them.

Little, or no sense of culture and mores, if that's what you're referring to, is either dependent on the person's affliction of some disorder like the antisocial personality, or simply being what one calls an iconoclast. The conventional have commonly labeled these people as being "clueless" about reality.
 
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