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Hello everyone!

I'm attending University and I have to work while studying in order to pay my bills.
Throughout my life I have tried several jobs, but I didn't really like any of them and some of them even made me depressed.

Here some examples:
- working in a Research Team of a Company for getting new Clients (i couldnt support 8h per day in front of computer screen and being surrounded by many electronic devices)
- working as a sales assistant in a small shop (i didn't like that i have to be around many people all the time and pretend to care about what our shop was selling)
- working in house keeping of a Hotel (left me super exhausted every day)
- selling Food and Drinks in a Football Stadion (too stressful)
- and some more little jobs

I have to mention that I didn't keep any of those jobs more than around 6 weeks, mainly because I was getting sick of them. And not just emotionally, but also physically. I'm super sensitive and if I didn't like the Job my Body started to respond with headache, acne, stomache problems,...

Now, before I continue complaing to much, I ask for your advice: Are there any small jobs for students which are supportable for INFPs and do not leave them completely drained every time?

It would be very helpful!
I am very interested in your tips and experiences! :)
 

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I've had one part time job and one volunteer position.

The job was a retail position in a very large shopping centre (second largest in the country....you can imagine...) and I hated the constant flow of new people who were often rude and forever 'asking to speak to a manager', I never had enough time to finish a task properly and was constantly changing activities (customers need serving on tills, my manager wants me to tidy books, someone comes along wanting help finding something, the fridge needs refilling, more people arrive at the tills....I wanted to cry most of the time).
So as you know, sales assistant isn't a good role for INFPs. I wouldn't mind working in a quiet shop in a small community where there were fewer customers, something like a gift or card shop.

My volunteer position was in a local nature reserve and I loved it! It involved working with the same group of people every week and we'd have different tasks (pruning, fence building, whatever needed doing) and we had the time to just get on with our job. It was peaceful, slower paced and outdoors. It depends if you need the job for money or for the experience, but those are my experiences.

I'm yet to find a paid part time job that doesn't look utterly draining so I'm curious to see what others have to say!
 

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Does your university offer part time student jobs? These are often short term (semester-by-semester) so if you don't like them you can try something else the following term. When I was in university I worked as a tutor and later as a lab technician (extracting DNA from plant samples) and I enjoyed both of these jobs. I also tried data entry for a collection, but I always got headaches from sitting at the computer for so long, so I didn't do that one for more than a few months.

You might also be able to work for campus services (food services, lifeguarding at the athletic center, etc.)
 

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Perhaps some nightjob if your schedule allows it? (I mean that lectures does not start at 8 all days for example, but weekends perhaps still?) I have not done that myself, it is just something I am thinking about perhaps trying to find for myself, say friday or saturday night. Nightjobs tend to give some extra an hour, and the kinds i am thinking about, like watching over someone sleeping and help occasionally with toilet etc, or some other job where it is rather calm at night(I bought a buscard not long ago from this car they have out for that at night, and wondered if it was hard to get a job there, they seem to not have much to do, the occasional buyer like me every few minutes), so that one could for example read some books while at work. Standby kind of possitions, where only half or less of the hours are active. It is then giving you some rest, you can do some studying so that you don't have to do it some other evening, and more money an hour. If a nightowl that is. I am, but I am still a bit undecisive if I want that kind of job as I have problem with staying awake in the daytime as it is. But it could be worth a try.
 

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I worked part time at an NBA stadium just helping with tickets and fan experience. This job really helped develop my extroverted side and wasn't draining and fairly easy, all we did all day was trouble shoot the app service people had on their phones, and got to joke around with people wearing opposing team jerseys, people seem to like Ne witty banter. I would do the job for free honestly, was too fun, felt like home.
 

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I liked working for a pediatric Dr. when I was a student.
It was a small office and I was doing reception and some care for the babies, like measuring and weighing.

My husband's best student job was mowing laws.
 

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I might recommend an office job of some sort. Your university might be hiring students as receptionists or office assistants in different offices. It's not physically demanding, and generally much more calm than dealing with customers from the public.
This ^ this is very stress free because they're understanding of your position.
 
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...Your university might be hiring students as receptionists or office assistants in different offices. It's not physically demanding, and generally much more calm than dealing with customers from the public.
Don't want to be negative, just sharing personal experience. :smile:
I did that summer job exactly and it was as boring as it can be. I would sneak out of the office and stand discreetly by the classroom doors just to listen to what the teacher was teaching so I would not be so bored. And it was the economics dep, lol! Listening to those courses was better than the job! I would also often sneak out and go talk to the teachers in their office. They had big offices with many personal things in display, like family pictures and trip souvenirs that we would talk about. That desk job turned off my brain.
 

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Unfortunately, nowadays employers think that paying you with money is enough to modivate you. Let's face it, for some people money isn't a motivator. It's a necessary evil. What you are probably looking for (in a very short description) is a way to contribute to something meaningful, correct? If you want to be satisfied in your job you are going to need to find meaning in it (at least that's how it is for me). Unfortunately, emoployers don't dish out meaning, they dish out paychecks. Which means that you need to find your meaning on your own.

I was working at a restaurant as a waiter, and it was draining as heck! I'd go to work, take orders, go home, and fall asleep. It didn't become life giving until I gave myself a meaning and a new job. My job was no longer to take people's orders. My job was to build a community and provide people with a peaceful (and pleasant) dining experience. And I did that because we live in a rough world and not everyone gets to experience that peace and feel a part of something.

I don't know if anything I'm saying is making sense but essentially this is what I am trying to communicate. Doing something with no meaning isn't life giving and employers (most of the time) aren't going to give you meaning, so you should look for meaning in what you do. If you don't find meaning then you will probably keep jumping from job to job.

Did any of that make sense? XD
 

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Don't want to be negative, just sharing personal experience. :smile:
I did that summer job exactly and it was as boring as it can be. I would sneak out of the office and stand discreetly by the classroom doors just to listen to what the teacher was teaching so I would not be so bored. And it was the economics dep, lol! Listening to those courses was better than the job! I would also often sneak out and go talk to the teachers in their office. They had big offices with many personal things in display, like family pictures and trip souvenirs that we would talk about. That desk job turned off my brain.
Haha yeah I won't deny it probably has a lot of down-time with nothing job-related to do. I think I'd still rather sit at a desk and have nothing to do than be working fast food or something. I had a couple of friends at uni who worked in on-campus offices and would bring either a recreational book or during school terms would bring study materials when they didn't have something to do. Obviously probably much more accepted in an on-campus office that hires students than something just in town.
 

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Before I graduated from my last university, I was a sort of TA, or work study, for a professor. She's an absolute sweetheart, and we shared a really close and meaningful relationship. Most of the work was secretarial or involved grading tests, all done in her office or at home, away from people. Plus, the work fulfilling because I was helping out a person that I felt a connection to, so this is definitely something to look into. Find a professor you like and ask them if they need a work study and if the university provides a program like that.

Now that it's summer and I'm in between universities, I work as a barista AND I LOVE IT!!! I don't know if I would necessarily recommend a job like this to you since you find social interactions are draining, but you might like it if you can find a small local coffee shop or one that doesn't see heavy traffic (like Starbucks). I myself work in a cafe where I'm the only one on shift (with just a small amount of overlap between me and the previous barista, so at most I'm working with only one other person). This gives me the freedom to do things the way I want to do them AND I don't become anxious or pressured from too much oversight. Plus, and I don't know if this is an INFP thing or not but, I have a fairly sweet, non-intimidating, ready-to-please demeanor, which translates into tips, which translates into CASH MONEY ON THE SPOT!!! WOOHOO!!! I MEAN LIKE, SOME WOMAN STRAIGHT DROPPED A $5 BILL IN MY TIP JAR THE OTHER DAY AND IT WAS AAAAALL MINE BECAUSE I WORK BY MYSELF BACK THERE! Nothing like instant gratification to make a job worthwhile, right? :laughing: Another perk is that, unlike in waitressing, there is a bar between you and the customer, so that makes the social part a little less intimidating.

I hope you find a job that suits you! Believe me, I've worked some other soul-sucking jobs before and it is no bueno. :frustrating: Keep us updated on your job hunt!
 

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My wife worked a shift as the receptionist for the college she was going to. It was fantastic because she could study (or watch movies...) during slow times.
 

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I'm a tiny woman but my favorite little part time job was in a warehouse. I only had to deal with my coworkers and supervisor (who was very laid back.) Never had to deal with customers face to face which is a nightmare for me in a big retail store or busy restaurant/bar. I got plenty of exercise and even got a little buff. :) A lot of places will be hiring this fall for the Christmas rush. Good luck!
 

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What has remained consistently favourable in previous jobs (and current) is having the option of working with people or in solitude. A job that doesn't require heavy mental exercises but instead has a focus more on the tangible tasks. But nothing too technical, so as to memories the movements of your tangible task and use your mind for other activities that don't feel like work. Things i occupy my mind with at work is poetry, expressive writing, different type of lists, future projections, defining goals. Although by far my favourite activity to do at work is to not think about anything in excess, refraining from entertaining ideas when they come. I've learnt as an introvert that overthinking is a sure way to drain your batteries fast.
 

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one advice. try to think where you want to work one day, literally any place/company/institution.
make a list of actual ones and go offer your service. even if it's working or volunteering, this is the way to get that mythical experience that employers always ask for. plus, you get contacts, experience, references for CV. volunteering is great, it's rare that people would reject a free mind/pair of hands. the potential pay will come later.
don't send e-mails for first contact, go there and knock on the door with your CV printout. people will remember and appreciate the face and the willingness. when you send email it's easy for them to go past it, but when you're actually there it's very different.
shake hands. introduce yourself with a full name and surname, it's more professional even though you're a student. never go to a potential place without knowing the basics of company history and goals. when asked incorporate (some of) company's goals in your answer.
 
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