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Doctor Who, "Blink" episode, time stamp 38 seconds to 56 seconds:

So would you guys add your thoughts please?
First off, it's easier to fake happiness than to fake sadness, though true happiness and true sadness are easy to identify and incredibly difficult to fake.

When a person is happy, the only work to do is enjoy the moment with them and make it last.

When a person is faking happiness, there is a sadness beneath the surface which part of me feels compelled to dive into and tinker around with and see if I can't sort out a happiness from it.

Whether it's the happiness of someone else or of myself, I like to earn it. I like to give it value as I work toward it, and that way it lasts longer, withstands more, isn't easily forsaken. The most potent emotions to me aren't things that come easy. I need a contrast of understanding the polar opposite in order to appreciate an emotion to the fullness of its capacity.

When a person is genuinely sad- well, they're genuinely sad. That, to me, is real. I go looking for realness. I would feel this way about happiness in any case where the person actually has a lot of momentum behind their emotion, not some easy street attitude that life is wonderful and the rest of us have something really wrong with us and stop being depressed it's all in your head...

I mean, I feel a disconnect from those seemingly oblivious "happy" people. D'ya know the kind of people I'm talking about? I feel like it's not only a frame of mind lacking in understanding and empathy but lacking human awareness of emotional reality. It doesn't go deeply anywhere. I can't swim around in it -if- it has no substance, no history, no story. Some people would like to go through life behaving as though nothing were ever wrong, and perhaps in their mind nothing ever was wrong, they're just that "resilient" or their neurochemistry knows nothing of despair or trial or being a phoenix rising from ashes.

I've nothing against happy people or happy things, so long as they are not the "mandatory happiness" variety which is blissfully ignorant of all that is actually going wrong in society and the world- ignorance perpetuates such problems. Also, if we had none of those problems, we'd risk attaining a mentality of complete disregard and no sympathy nor empathy whatsoever should those problems recur in the future for any reason...

I'm rambling.

The tapestry of emotional development and responsiveness, to me, needs a balance. On a spectrum, each end has its worth and can be productive. Just as we can feel passion, we can experience apathy- we can even feel ambivalence which causes quite a lot of internal turmoil that can be unhealthy and destructive, not just to an individual but to society and to the world. I've explored more when depressed than I ever have when euphoric, because sadness makes me think, and happiness just makes me want to *be*. Either state can be helpful, but I personally need to immerse myself in thoughts to learn, moreso than I need to shut thoughts off and shun philosophy in exchange for hedonistic pursuits.
 

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Fu Dominant
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I'm thinking this is more the realm of the type 4s. :tongue: Don't get me wrong, I enjoy dramatic movies and music and I have a certain appreciation for pain and misery, but I'm not 'attracted' to those things. But then I'm a 9 and 2, so I'm more naturally positive and optimistic. Sometimes my SO says I'm annoyingly *too* optimistic. :laughing:
 

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I think I am so used to being sad I am almost afraid of being happy. I also think there are things I am not doing that would make me happy. Why I am not attempting to do them is the real question.
 
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