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A big part of me thinks that the same kind of people who we would have thought of as very sexually repressed in the past (before saying such a thing was a thoughtcrime), are now classifying themselves as a sexual orientation to garner the same legitimacy and social support the LGBT community manages.

Yet, I can't bring myself to care to the point of actually being against it, humans being the sick fucks that we all are, of all the personal issues someone might have, it doesn't get more harmless than that.
 

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1. do you find it hard to get a man boner/wet pussy?
2. are you scared? because of beliefs, culture, etc.?
3. just why?
I'm not asexual but can have the same reactions at times.

You just don't feel that same drive that others do.

Imo if it were me, I'd see it as disgusting, unnecessarily exposing parts of your body that...like why, man? And what's the point if in the end you feel nothing but a great sense of violation and embarrassment almost from not getting the results that are expected of a nonasexual?

That'd be me if it were me in the situation, Idk of others.
 

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haven't fapped in a long time, but I get triggered when I see a nice girl.

probably because of alcohol though, shit.
 

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I think it's really the same as asking why don't sociopaths have empathy. Some people simply seem to be born with a missing ''chip'' in their brain at birth.
 

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1. I had the opportunity to "lose it." I didn't want to, so I didn't. And I still don't. So no, it's not that I couldn't get action. 2. I have no need for it.3. Cause I don't give a fuck.
 

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I'm just an edge lord and want to rebel against unnecessary shame phrases like "sexual repression" and the addictive posturing toward sex as if it alone is the only good thing in the world that you can't get enough of. I think placing too much importance on certain things creates bad norms that harm people and lead to suicides, homocides and genocides.
 

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I'm just an edge lord and want to rebel against unnecessary shame phrases like "sexual repression" and the addictive posturing toward sex as if it alone is the only good thing in the world that you can't get enough of. I think placing too much importance on certain things creates bad norms that harm people and lead to suicides, homocides and genocides.
I have a homocide that likes you in a kind of special way...
 

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I wonder the same. From what I understand of asexuals, they have no libidos. But I think that's curious because libido is not just directly related to sex acts but also things like mate attraction behavior which can be very broad.
Complicating this is the fact that many asexuals claim they masturbate, which means they do have libidos, but they're...not directed at anyone?
 
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I think it's really the same as asking why don't sociopaths have empathy. Some people simply seem to be born with a missing ''chip'' in their brain at birth.
Don't compare us with sociopaths, that's rude :p
In all seriousness though. Asexuals don't like sex for the same reason that gay men don't enjoy sex with women. It's just a natural variation on the spectrum of human sexuality (unless you believe that homosexuality is a mental illness/is forbidden by your religion). Just because you like something and can't imagine living without it, doesn't mean that there is something wrong with people who don't like it. I've always been asexual; I had a happy, normal upbringing in a politically liberal region, was always healthy, no mental illness or hormonal imbalances in the brain. I don't feel like there is anything missing from my life because of being asexual (aside from societal expectations to have sex). I'm not scared of sex or repulsed by it, in fact I quite enjoy romantic novels and movies. If some people are attracted to men, some to women, to both genders, and some to people in general regardless of gender, then why wouldn't it make sense that there would be a subset of the population who are attracted to no gender?
 

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Asexuals don't like sex for the same reason that gay men don't enjoy sex with women.
Gay men do like sex. If they weren't attracted to men, (they wouldn't be gay, but) they'd still probably masturbate. You're confusing arousal triggering for pretense of a libido. You can be horny without being aroused. They aren't remotely the same thing. You can masturbate without visualization too, so you don't need even the idea of a person or anything else really, just the capacity for sensation.
 

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I am sexually repressed because of strict adherence to tradition. I don't want to have sex doesn't mean I don't like intimacy.
 

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Don't compare us with sociopaths, that's rude :p
In all seriousness though. Asexuals don't like sex for the same reason that gay men don't enjoy sex with women. It's just a natural variation on the spectrum of human sexuality (unless you believe that homosexuality is a mental illness/is forbidden by your religion). Just because you like something and can't imagine living without it, doesn't mean that there is something wrong with people who don't like it. I've always been asexual; I had a happy, normal upbringing in a politically liberal region, was always healthy, no mental illness or hormonal imbalances in the brain. I don't feel like there is anything missing from my life because of being asexual (aside from societal expectations to have sex). I'm not scared of sex or repulsed by it, in fact I quite enjoy romantic novels and movies. If some people are attracted to men, some to women, to both genders, and some to people in general regardless of gender, then why wouldn't it make sense that there would be a subset of the population who are attracted to no gender?
I think what he meant to say is that there may be something biologically different about asexuals that we haven't discovered yet. We don't know how sexuality works yet so it could be true. That doesn't mean it's a bad thing, being asexual. I think this topic is just about understanding, because to everyone else with active libidos, an asexual seems like an alien xD

it's curious to me because of all the other behavior we exhibit that spurs from our libido, like dressing up, being sexy or flirting. these are mate-attraction behaviors so I wonder if asexual people engage in them and what that means. Do you?
 

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Asexuality is a denial of one’s natural sexuality as a result of sexual anxiety or shame coupled with a low sex drive and a means to control their environment and those around them.
Some masturbate some don't which is an odd phenomena as all humans need fantasy to reach orgasm. So they must fantasise about another being. Yes it is true our brains are directly linked to out sexual organs.
Test it out! Try masturbating to the Saturday afternoon football match, the physical stimulation will take time but eventually your mind will switch off the football and your latest squeeze will pop into your mind moments before your orgasm
Asexuals experience depression and Social anxiety
 

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I think what he meant to say is that there may be something biologically different about asexuals that we haven't discovered yet. We don't know how sexuality works yet so it could be true. That doesn't mean it's a bad thing, being asexual. I think this topic is just about understanding, because to everyone else with active libidos, an asexual seems like an alien xD

it's curious to me because of all the other behavior we exhibit that spurs from our libido, like dressing up, being sexy or flirting. these are mate-attraction behaviors so I wonder if asexual people engage in them and what that means. Do you?
There may be some possible genetic links to asexuality. But there's not enough study on the subject. I've been thinking about it lately though, and I think my uncle "could" be an asexual. Never married or had kids, and as far as I can tell he doesn't seem to have much interest in women (or men). Since the time I was born I've never seen him in any relationship. I can't picture him in one either, he's kinda an odd person.

Personally those "mating" behaviors have never held any interest for me. In elementary school I tried to emulate Helga Pataki and have a crush on someone, but it didn't work, it made no sense to me, and since I didn't understand why people acted that way, I forgot about and decided not to bother with it. The only times I've engaged in those behaviors was when my mom pressured me to wear makeup/dress nice for occasions, and the only other times I tried flirting or dating was towards the end of high school when my peers fear of "being alone" rubbed off on me. I did feel fear of being seen as ugly or gross and being made fun of for it, though. So I tried to not be ugly or gross.
 

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@Tropes @Grandmaster Yoda @master of time and space

While some asexuals may very possibly be sexually repressed, just like it is possible for any sexuality to be confused about their nature, I think that for most of us this is not the case.

In fact, for many other asexuals and I the reverse is true. We are "asexually repressed", like square pegs trying to squeeze into a round hole because we know no other way. Assuming that we are something that we're not for most of our early lives, repressing all the moments when things didn't add up the way we thought it would. I would like to share this story from another website because if you replace the boy with a girl, and the evangelical church with a catholic church, it is nearly 100% my own experience growing up. Minus the awareness that I was different, maybe deep down I knew it but that part was repressed.

I used to be a huge slut shamer because I didn't know other people felt physiological/mental things compelling them to have sex. I compared my peers' sexual urges to dumb teenager shit, like partying all the time because they think they're adults. I thought that if it came easy to me, it should come easy to everyone my age not to have sex. I thought teens and adults alike were just overly exaggerating the whole sex and puberty thing. I grew up under the assumption I would eventually want to want marriage, a relationship with sex, children of my own once I was an adult, when in reality I never truly cared about any of these things, I just thought I did because I was told I would! Once I realized that I was the abnormal one, I stopped judging people for their sexual nature.

 
We live in a highly repressive society when it comes to sexuality. Many people are in denial about what they feel and what they want because of the ubiquity of such repressive messages. To illustrate this, consider the story of a boy.

He grew up in an evangelical protestant home. In his youth, he often heard the message that he should save sex for marriage. It would be difficult, he was told, but it is what God wanted. However, it was easy for him, so he told himself that if he had a girlfriend, then it would be a challenge. One thing leads to another, so beware, they told him. So he imagined that were it to happen that he did one thing, then he would want to do another. He was warned about pornography. It was something that many males his age struggled with, but that he should use self-control and repent should he stumble. For him, it wasn’t even a temptation.

At some level he knew that not having sex was unusually easy for him, and he was aware of the fact that getting a girlfriend was much lower on his priorities than it was for many of his peers. During his time in college he only got a crush on one person, and that only lasted for about two weeks. He was aware that that was atypical as well, and deep down, he knew that the reason that he’d never watched porn was because it just doesn’t seem interesting to him.

He believed that it was for religious reasons that he wasn’t having sex, but he did sometimes ask himself if he would be having sex if he didn’t have those religious views. He imagined that it would be unlikely. He would, he suspected, be among those who were unable to “get any.” He had never developed the skill set necessary for doing so. But he couldn’t admit to himself that the reason he had never developed it was lack of motivation. The idea that he might not like sex if he did have it or that he simply had no desire for sex simply didn’t cross his mind. He imagined that once he would get married then he would have sex and like it just like everyone else. For much of high school and some of college, the idea of having sex seemed utterly repulsive to him and he was not at all looking forward to doing after he got married. But he thought, or perhaps hoped, he would get over that. He could never fully acknowledge to himself that he simply wasn’t interested in sex. He was in denial about not wanting to have sex.

He was asexually repressed.

Asexual repression is when you are in denial about your lack of interest in sex. With all of the cultural messages people are given about sexuality, about how great sex is, about how everybody wants to have sex, it can be hard to admit to a lack of interest. And it isn’t only religious conservatives who can be asexually repressed. Asexual repression pervades our society. Many men believe that a part of being a man is always being interested in sex, always being ready to perform. After all, men are supposed to be testosterone-driven sex machines, and for many, admitting that sometimes they aren’t interested is like admitting that they aren't real men.

Images of sex are everywhere. Magazines tell us twenty tips to be super sexy, seven secrets to have the hottest sex ever, what turns men on, what turns women on. Do magazines tell us about how we need to be hungry? Do they remind us of a need to feel thirst? Perhaps ads for food or sports drinks do, but we are reminded about how strong our sexual cravings are supposed to be in ads for everything from Viagra to tires, from beer to health food to cars. Could this constant bombardment of sex be not so much a reflection of how obsessed with it everyone is, but an attempt to make everyone obsessed because without constant pressure, they might not be?

Asexuals can take a long time before they recognize their asexuality. Why? Because they are afraid to admit, even to themselves, that they are uninterested in sex. They try to convince themselves of their sexual desires, unable to acknowledge their asexuality, because of cultural pressures against admitting sexual disinterest.

Our cultural is so asexually repressed, that we have made sexual disinterest into a disease and given it the long and awkward name “hypoactive sexual desire disorder.” We are so afraid of sexual disinterest, so convinced it is unnatural and must be repressed that we have medicalized it, pathologized it. Therapists have tried to cure it, and Pharmaceuticals have tried to find a magic pill to obliterate it. But all in vain. We cannot eliminate the sexual disinterest that we fear so much, so instead, via mass media, we tell the public about how widespread this “sexual dysfunction” is. We try to convince everyone that this is a massive public health problem.

Raise a loud cry in the streets! Proclaim it from the hills and from the mountain tops! Announce it in the cities, the towns and the villages! “Sex! Sex! Sex! Sex is awesome, sex is great, everybody wants to have sex! If you don’t want to have sex, you need to get cured, because everybody wants to have sex!”

We have created this mythical concept “sexual repression,” that when people aren’t having sex, when they aren’t interested, it must be because they are repressing their natural, innate, powerful sexual urges. “Sexual repression” is nothing but an attempt to convince ourselves of how intense everyone’s sex drive is in light of the obvious reality that some people just aren’t that interested. “Sexual repression” was claimed to be the causes of neuroses, but, truly, asexual repression is the cause of many mental health problems: people desperately trying to convince themselves they have feelings that they don’t have, people suffering from delusions about how they really want what everyone tells them they should want, even when they don’t want it, people consenting to, and even seeking out, sex that they don’t desire in order to convince themselves that they are “normal”, that they aren’t “inhibited.”

There is a cultural belief that the so-called sexual revolution “freed” sex. It gave people the “permission” to be sexual, the permission to say “yes” to sex. Indeed, multiply the yes’s and add in some Oh’s, grant to people the permission to give the most orgasmic affirmative to sex they possibly can! But is there permission to say “no” to sex? Not just “no” to some particular person, or on some particular occasion, but simply “No, I’m just not interested”?

Don’t people recognize that sexual disinterest is natural? Everybody’s not interested in sex sometimes. Some people aren’t interested in sex all the time. Everybody has lots of people they don’t want to have sex with. For some people, that's everybody.

I’m sure you have guessed by now, oh reader, that the repressed boy in the story is none other than myself. But I do not seek your pity. I do not want your sympathy. I want, instead, your support in fighting this asexually repressive culture. We must let people know that not only is it okay to admit sexual feelings, to enjoy sex, to be sexual. It is also okay to admit to lacking sexual feelings, to not like sex, to be asexual. Just as religious freedom requires the right to have no religion, just as freedom of speech requires the right not to speak, so must true sexual freedom necessitate the right not to be sexual, to admit disinterest, even lifelong disinterest, without fear of being thought sexually repressed or being neurotic or in need of a cure. Only then will there be true sexual liberation.

So the next time that someone tells you that you’re sexually repressed, tell them, “It is not that I am sexually repressed. It is that you are asexually repressive!”

Asexual Explorations Blog: Repressed!
 

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@FestiveTamale - I've heard of stories like that in the past, and they tend to discredit the idea of asexuality better than a Freudian psychoanalyst ever could - because they all lack the important element that asexuality implies: obliviousness.
I am not a fan of tennis, I've played tennis, and despite many tennis fans who have strong urges to play tennis and can't wait to the day of the week where they have free time to go play, it does nothing for me, you might say I am an atennist. What you don't hear from me - or anyone else who isn't interested in tennis - is that they are repulsed by the idea of tennis. In the same token that love isn't the opposite of hate, the opposite of lacking an interest in sex isn't repulsion, but a dry disinterest. None of the stories of "repressed asexuality" descrybe that though, rather - much like boy in your story - they describe repulsion at the thought. Repulsion isn't the static lack of motion neutrality towards a subject, it is a motion against a subject, it doesn't fit what you'd expect a lack of sexuality to produce, but it does fit what you'd expect sexual repression to produce.
 
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