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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Why do galaxies merge and dark wot nots

Dark energy
Dark Flow
Dark matter

Someone posted pretty picture of two galaxies colliding so it got me thinking a bit about stuff

Yes, I think in a bing bang bong utopia galaxies should be flying apart not mingling like galactic hussies. Not merging together and here the hows in why in me lazy bullet format.

1) It make no sense (aye argue with quantum fizirrcisissys)
2) How can a gravitational bound galaxy be gravitationally attracted to some and not others…these are truly massive distances…measured in the light slippers galore.
3) To be whisking off at constant* velocities separated by vast distances and falling in spiral love with some and not others
4) To be whisking off at ever increasing* velocities and falling in love with some elliptical tramp.
5) Wouldn’t the above dictate, if there was a merging or increasing cluster of galaxies/density eventually result in one big giant blob condensing back into a singularity?

I therefore unleash to the world and puny earthlings two conjectures

Dreamy mcFumbles Dark slipper Conjecture – which ive clearly made up and would expect to receive a nobel prize. That’s a lot off muffin cash. I can get another year out of these slippers as long as me uncles dawg dosnt chew em again..and scare the kittys 2

And

Scareee Black Holes Conjecture - super massive ones (and perhaps a consolidation or opposition of the smaller ones)
Now I am suggesting is it possible that these galactic beasts (makes roar noise) actually steer themselves Higgledy piggledy all over the place through directional gravitational forces and a variety of eddies through the fabric (think mesh) of space time dragging their galaxy with em
 

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Discussion Starter #2
hmm you gonna do yawn gravity post mr hyde?..the one where those twats dont stiff governments outa dark cash?

you have annoying habit of talking in the 3rd of 4th p[person thee know and to oneself
 

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1) Sure it does. Most Galaxies form a local cluster that have orbits. The Milky Way is gravitationally bound to 3 other galaxies (if I’m remembering right)
2) Local Clusters are also lightly bound to other local clusters, which form super-clusters etc..
3)The theory is that everything is accelerating away from a single point of origin. So basically this means that locally we are bound to others, but globally we are accelerating away from each other.
4)The theory also states that we are accelerating away from each other in a more or less uniform manner.

Dark Flow - An unexplained additional velocity toward a particular point in the sky, currently theorized to be a mass of Dark Matter.
Dark Matter - Theorized to be 23% of the mass of the visible universe. As yet undetected.
Dark Energy - Something people made up for an affect that they can't explain. (imho)

If you take in all the theories and whatnot and tie them all together, then it starts to make a little bit more sense. For more on gravitational influence (and why super-massive black holes at the center of galaxies exert such a massive influence) see the Inverse-Square Law.
 

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I know what you are saying. Hubbles law would decree they should all be moving away...it does too :(
(1x 2 x 3x x distance) is that an inverse do you think

however in the grand scheme it makes no sense imo

Perhaps they have under estimated gravity, or it applies to a local spacial frame, is that what you were kinda driving at ? which I quite liked.


And you meant, I think, a super massive black sphere, not hole, with an approximation of 100th of said galactic mass
 

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Perhaps they have under estimated gravity, or it applies to a local spacial frame, is that what you were kinda driving at ? which I quite liked.
I'm a big fan of M-Theory, which some theorize (I think, I haven't really looked at it in a while) that gravity is possibly an affect bleeding over from another universe. (would be pretty cool if it turned out to be true) So if by local spacial frame you mean local to our universe (assuming there are multiple) then yes I like that idea.


And you meant, I think, a super massive black sphere, not hole, with an approximation of 100th of said galactic mass
I meant hole. Supermassive black sphere would indicate that you can measure the circumference of what are known as black holes. While its possible to approximate the actual density and mass of a black hole based on its influence in its environment, it would, i think, be nearly impossible to measure an entity that swallows the medium by which you are making the measurement. I think it may be possible to approximate the circumference of the event horizon, but I'd have to hit the books again to be sure. Gravitational lensing would be the closest thing to that, but lensing really only measures mass. There are a few videos floating around somewhere from radio-telescopes that show multiple stars in an extremely tight orbit around what they think is the galactic center, and their orbits look to be only 3-4 times longer than the circumference of the stars themselves.

Anyway, all this talk has made me interested again and I have a physics and astro physics class coming up soon that i'm looking forward to.
 

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I know what you are saying. Hubbles law would decree they should all be moving away...it does too :(
(1x 2 x 3x x distance) is that an inverse do you think

however in the grand scheme it makes no sense imo
Hubble’s Law – Everything outside our local area has red-shifted. The farther away an object is, the faster it moves away.

Galaxies would not appear to be receding from us unless the universe was expanding. For example, dots on the surface of a balloon move away from each other as the balloon becomes blown up.

How does one measure this so-called expansion? Answer: Light

Light is electromagnetic energy, radiation, waves and particles.

Light travels in particle-waves of electrical and magnetic fields at the speed of 300,000 km/s. These fields make up the electromagnetic spectrum: radio waves, infrared waves, visible waves, ultraviolet waves, x ray waves, and gamma ray waves. Light is so fast that it only takes 8 minutes to travel from the Sun to Earth. This is because light travels at the fastest speed in the known universe.

There are three categories in the electromagnetic spectrum. There is the emission spectrum, where only certain wave lengths are present, and the absorption spectrum, where a continuous spectrum of certain wave lengths are missing, and a continuous spectrum, where all wave lengths are present.

Emission lines from the emission spectrum represent electrons from atoms that give up energy, moving from higher to lower energy, while absorption lines from the absorption spectrum represent electrons absorbing and increasing in energy.

Within these spectrums, one learns the characteristics of electromagnetic radiation. Light travels in pulses or waves, and the distance between the top of these waves or pulses, called crests, to the next crest, represents the wavelength. By measuring the wavelength, one learns how much energy the wave has. If the wavelength is longer, it has less energy, but if it is shorter, it has more energy.

Another way to describe the electromagnetic energy or wavelength is through frequency. The time that it takes for a wavelength to pass to a certain point shows frequency. As frequency increases, wavelength becomes shorter and has more energy, and as frequency decreases, wavelength becomes longer and has less energy.

Light travels both as waves and as mass-less elementary particles called photons. Light moves as a wave and a particle, in a constant duality, and measures through frequency, wavelength, amplitude, and so on.

Using a prism to refract light, Isaac Newton found that white light contains all colors from the visible spectrum while colors, such as red, only refract red. However, humans, with biologically limited eyes, only perceive certain waves in certain colors. Red has the longest wavelength while violet has the shortest wavelength, ranging from red to blue or 700 nm to 400 nm. These standards help scientists determine light’s properties.

One can also tell the characteristics of light through the Doppler Effect. The faster light approaches, the shorter the wavelength, but as it distances, the wavelength becomes longer. Through this method, one can determine whether light Blue Shifts or Red Shifts. Blue Shifted shows that light moves toward the short end of the spectrum, while Red Shifted shows that light moves further away to indicate a longer wavelength. Through this Doppler Shift, one can detect whether an object comes toward us or moves away, when it is rotating, and how it is rotating.

This method is important because we have learned that the center of a star’s orbit sometimes moves relative to the planet’s orbit. If a planet orbits toward the observing apparatus, it has Blue Shifted, until it moves away, and Red Shifted. The greater the mass of the planet, the less it will move, but the less of the mass of the planet, the more it will move.

Hubble found that whenever he observed galaxies outside the local area, the galaxies appeared to be moving away, and the further away they were, the faster they were going. By observing and calculating patterns of red shifts of objects outside the local area, one can determine that the universe expands and increases in expansion, which also evidences the Big Bang theory, along with CMB radiation and high helium content.


Why do galaxies merge and dark wot nots
Galaxies collide all the time, but rarely run into each other, because of the largeness of space between them. There have been tidal disturbances and gravitational interactions between certain galaxies as they merge. Our galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy may collide 3.5 billion years from now.

Dark energy
Dark Flow
Dark matter
According to results from a WMAP satellite, the universe has 4% ordinary (baryonic) matter, 23% non-baryonic dark matter, and 73% dark energy.

There are many speculations about how dark energy drove cosmic inflation between GUT and Electroweak eras. Our previously homogeneous, isotropic universe gained enough miniscule density fluctuations necessary for gravity to accelerate universal expansion.
 
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