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On this forum, a lot of people have been disagreeing with boomers end in 1964, but I have also been reading a lot on this forum that they think 1961 is the earliest gen X can be, but I disagree cause 1960 is like 1961-1964. 1959 in my opinion is the youngest boomer. I know Strauss and Howe considers boomers as 1943-1960, but their definitions make no sense if they consider Gen X as 21 years as 1961-1981, and millennials as 1982-2004, which is 23 years, and 2000-2004 is gen z, as 1995-1999 are late millennials with a couple of Z traits only. Most common start dates for X I see are 1960 and 1965, but all I am saying is that 1960-1964 should be part of the same generation.
 

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Not many people know about this, but the term "Generation Jones" was coined for those born from the mid-50s to 1964 (The 2nd half of the baby boomers), named after the phrase "Keeping up with the Joneses." Unlike the older baby boomers, this cohort for the most part didn't grow up with WWII Veterans as fathers, grew up with LBJ and Richard Nixon as political figures rather than Eisenhower and JFK, saw high unemployment and oil crisis during their "coming of age" in the 1970s, and were too young to serve in the Vietnam War.
 

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Not many people know about this, but the term "Generation Jones" was coined for those born from the mid-50s to 1964 (The 2nd half of the baby boomers), named after the phrase "Keeping up with the Joneses." Unlike the older baby boomers, this cohort for the most part didn't grow up with WWII Veterans as fathers, grew up with LBJ and Richard Nixon as political figures rather than Eisenhower and JFK, saw high unemployment and oil crisis during their "coming of age" in the 1970s, and were too young to serve in the Vietnam War.
I view 1940-1945 as boomer more than anyone born after 1959. I mean Silent Generation sounds better for a group of people born between the end of WWI and the start of WWII when there was silence in the world. Actually, boomers can have parents who are silent gen, greatest gen, and the lost gen, while gen x can have boomers, silent gen, and greatest gen as parents, and WWII veterans were the greatest gen and the older members of the silent gen. There are many children who are more than 40 years younger than both their parents. There are many gen y with silent gen parents, and many gen z with boomer parents. My friend born on January 23, 1994 has two younger sisters (born 2001 and 2005) who are gen z, and they were born to a boomer father (1956), but their mom was born in 1968.
 

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Not many people know about this, but the term "Generation Jones" was coined for those born from the mid-50s to 1964 (The 2nd half of the baby boomers), named after the phrase "Keeping up with the Joneses." Unlike the older baby boomers, this cohort for the most part didn't grow up with WWII Veterans as fathers, grew up with LBJ and Richard Nixon as political figures rather than Eisenhower and JFK, saw high unemployment and oil crisis during their "coming of age" in the 1970s, and were too young to serve in the Vietnam War.
I was born in 1956, and my dad was a World War II veteran. Many of my classmates' dads were Korean War veterans but they simply got married at a younger age than my parents. I don't remember Eisenhower at all and barely remember Kennedy. There was stagflation in the late 1970s. Also, the United States was trying to heal from the Vietnam War era, which was very divisive. I don't think that it ever did heal. I know that I struggle with that at times. The images that were on the TV news were pretty horrific and I was a sensitive little kid in the 1960s, being exposed to that horror. I still have nightmares about it at times. Sometimes, I have been overwhelmed by those memories during the day. Fortunately, not too often. It is distressing to think about what people are capable of doing to other people.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Not many people know about this, but the term "Generation Jones" was coined for those born from the mid-50s to 1964 (The 2nd half of the baby boomers), named after the phrase "Keeping up with the Joneses." Unlike the older baby boomers, this cohort for the most part didn't grow up with WWII Veterans as fathers, grew up with LBJ and Richard Nixon as political figures rather than Eisenhower and JFK, saw high unemployment and oil crisis during their "coming of age" in the 1970s, and were too young to serve in the Vietnam War.
I have heard of it, but that is a weird name for the cusp between boomer and X. The cusp begins at 1955 and ends at 1964. 1955-1959 are on the boomer side with a few X traits, and 1960-1964 are on the X side with a few boomer traits (most common start dates are 1960 and 1965 for X). I think these cusps are clearly important, especially for those who are tossed between two different generations like generation jones, xennial, and most importantly, zennial. Like those born from 1960-1964 who are being called boomers consider themselves more as X, those born from 1980-1985 see themselves more as X than Y, though the latest they start the Y generation is 1982, and for zennial, those born from 1995-1999 see themselves more as Y than Z (I notice sources tend to start Gen Z anywhere from 1990 to 2004, though it is rare for them to start Gen Z before 1995), cause they are the last who actually knew how it was like before cell phones, laptops, and having an internet connection became mainstream. 1990 and 1991 are the true 90s kids cause they were born in the 90s and spent most of their childhood in the 90s. During the early 2000s, they were already preteens. Those born from January-April 1990 were teenagers before the early 2000s ended.
 

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Gen X is a very short generation. Boomers and Millennials are much longer generations due to actual cultural similarity. Something very specific happened in Western culture in the 60s and early 70s. People born during this time of chaos and upheaval are Gen X. Boomers share a continuous, blessed narrative of being golden children of the struggling silent generation before them. They enjoyed a really comfortable childhood and adolescence, with adulthood causing extreme change and they are pretty comfortable overall as elderly people. This is the cause of Gen X and Millennials resenting Boomers as self absorbed or greedy. Everything is about them, anything behind is primitive and too conservative, anything ahead of them is a copy, a thief, a beneficiary of their remarkably privileged lives.

I'm a social worker. I had to take sociology classes to earn my degree. I don't always agree with harsh judgments of any large group of people, but I do kind of see this attitude towards children born in the turbulence of the 60s and early 70s.

I'm very fortunate to have very loving parents. My father is a Silent, much older than my mother but my mother was old fashioned....so old fashioned that she cried when she discovered I am a lesbian, while my father stoically accepted it. He even called me sensible for choosing against men. As if I had a choice???

Anyway, I tend to argue for our generation being shorter, not longer. It has nothing to do with grunge music. It has more with growing up in a time of watching the world go from relatively innocent and not technologically advanced, with lots of changes in social attitudes towards race and gender, and appreciating it. Millennials take race and gender equality for granted for the most part. Bless them. That's why conservatives call them snowflakes. I disagree, but they never knew the world of easy racist and homophobic jokes we grew up with in family comedies. They don't remember this time, a mixture of beautiful innocence and horrible hatred.

If you're not scared by the phones in the house in Bob Clark's Black Christmas, you're not Gen X or a Boomer. You're probably a Millennial with vague memories of land lines. So how to cut between Boomers and X? It's too easy to generalize post war suburbia to late 60s rapid change. I saw this in my schools though. My elementary school was integrated, just as a matter of course. I think things like that matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Gen X is a very short generation. Boomers and Millennials are much longer generations due to actual cultural similarity. Something very specific happened in Western culture in the 60s and early 70s. People born during this time of chaos and upheaval are Gen X. Boomers share a continuous, blessed narrative of being golden children of the struggling silent generation before them. They enjoyed a really comfortable childhood and adolescence, with adulthood causing extreme change and they are pretty comfortable overall as elderly people. This is the cause of Gen X and Millennials resenting Boomers as self absorbed or greedy. Everything is about them, anything behind is primitive and too conservative, anything ahead of them is a copy, a thief, a beneficiary of their remarkably privileged lives.

I'm a social worker. I had to take sociology classes to earn my degree. I don't always agree with harsh judgments of any large group of people, but I do kind of see this attitude towards children born in the turbulence of the 60s and early 70s.

I'm very fortunate to have very loving parents. My father is a Silent, much older than my mother but my mother was old fashioned....so old fashioned that she cried when she discovered I am a lesbian, while my father stoically accepted it. He even called me sensible for choosing against men. As if I had a choice???

Anyway, I tend to argue for our generation being shorter, not longer. It has nothing to do with grunge music. It has more with growing up in a time of watching the world go from relatively innocent and not technologically advanced, with lots of changes in social attitudes towards race and gender, and appreciating it. Millennials take race and gender equality for granted for the most part. Bless them. That's why conservatives call them snowflakes. I disagree, but they never knew the world of easy racist and homophobic jokes we grew up with in family comedies. They don't remember this time, a mixture of beautiful innocence and horrible hatred.

If you're not scared by the phones in the house in Bob Clark's Black Christmas, you're not Gen X or a Boomer. You're probably a Millennial with vague memories of land lines. So how to cut between Boomers and X? It's too easy to generalize post war suburbia to late 60s rapid change. I saw this in my schools though. My elementary school was integrated, just as a matter of course. I think things like that matter.
Lets face it. Baby boomer are the only generation that was not defined based on experiences. They were defined as those born during the years when fertility rates went from the number at the end of WWII to the year when it dropped down to that same value leading to a constant decline in the fertility rate since. In the US though, fertility rates were at 2.00 and higher from 1989-2009 with exception of 1995-1997. I keep it at 1960-1979 for gen x cause its easier for me to remember and I could write an essay about why I consider those years as gen x aside from the fact that its all 60s and 70s born only.
 

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Lets face it. Baby boomer are the only generation that was not defined based on experiences. They were defined as those born during the years when fertility rates went from the number at the end of WWII to the year when it dropped down to that same value leading to a constant decline in the fertility rate since. In the US though, fertility rates were at 2.00 and higher from 1989-2009 with exception of 1995-1997. I keep it at 1960-1979 for gen x cause its easier for me to remember and I could write an essay about why I consider those years as gen x aside from the fact that its all 60s and 70s born only.
True enough. Baby boomers were born when their parents were busily (and happily) mating and reproducing. The war was over and fertility rates went up and stayed up for years after World War II ended. Eventually, the parents of baby boomers left their reproductive years. There were far fewer people born during the Great Depression than before the 1929 stock market crash so the following generation was, of course, much fewer in number.
 

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Gen X is a very short generation. Boomers and Millennials are much longer generations due to actual cultural similarity. Something very specific happened in Western culture in the 60s and early 70s. People born during this time of chaos and upheaval are Gen X. Boomers share a continuous, blessed narrative of being golden children of the struggling silent generation before them. They enjoyed a really comfortable childhood and adolescence, with adulthood causing extreme change and they are pretty comfortable overall as elderly people. This is the cause of Gen X and Millennials resenting Boomers as self absorbed or greedy. Everything is about them, anything behind is primitive and too conservative, anything ahead of them is a copy, a thief, a beneficiary of their remarkably privileged lives.

I'm a social worker. I had to take sociology classes to earn my degree. I don't always agree with harsh judgments of any large group of people, but I do kind of see this attitude towards children born in the turbulence of the 60s and early 70s.

I'm very fortunate to have very loving parents. My father is a Silent, much older than my mother but my mother was old fashioned....so old fashioned that she cried when she discovered I am a lesbian, while my father stoically accepted it. He even called me sensible for choosing against men. As if I had a choice???

Anyway, I tend to argue for our generation being shorter, not longer. It has nothing to do with grunge music. It has more with growing up in a time of watching the world go from relatively innocent and not technologically advanced, with lots of changes in social attitudes towards race and gender, and appreciating it. Millennials take race and gender equality for granted for the most part. Bless them. That's why conservatives call them snowflakes. I disagree, but they never knew the world of easy racist and homophobic jokes we grew up with in family comedies. They don't remember this time, a mixture of beautiful innocence and horrible hatred.

If you're not scared by the phones in the house in Bob Clark's Black Christmas, you're not Gen X or a Boomer. You're probably a Millennial with vague memories of land lines. So how to cut between Boomers and X? It's too easy to generalize post war suburbia to late 60s rapid change. I saw this in my schools though. My elementary school was integrated, just as a matter of course. I think things like that matter.
The bizarre thing about all of the news coverage of baby boomers was that it was always about the "leading edge" of the baby boomer generation (those born in 1946). There was a joke for years that all baby boomers were the same age, regardless of the year that they were born.
 

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My family on my mother's side (had) a unique take/perspective on this;
My great-grandmother was a "greatest gen"
Grandmother was a "silent gen"
Mother is a "baby boomer"
I'm a "Gen X"
Daughter is a "Millennial"
... one right after the other, and then she waited juuuust a little longer to have her kids - both of my grandsons are "gen alpha"
the result is that prior to my great-grandmother passing, we had five living generations of females, and then prior to my grandmother's passing, we had five living generations again (although they weren't all female).
Very interesting perspective and our family was fortunate enough to be able to share so many rich experiences from different periods in history from a first-person perspective.
 

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On this forum, a lot of people have been disagreeing with boomers end in 1964, but I have also been reading a lot on this forum that they think 1961 is the earliest gen X can be, but I disagree cause 1960 is like 1961-1964. 1959 in my opinion is the youngest boomer. I know Strauss and Howe considers boomers as 1943-1960, but their definitions make no sense if they consider Gen X as 21 years as 1961-1981, and millennials as 1982-2004, which is 23 years, and 2000-2004 is gen z, as 1995-1999 are late millennials with a couple of Z traits only. Most common start dates for X I see are 1960 and 1965, but all I am saying is that 1960-1964 should be part of the same generation.
Purely anecdotal, but I was born in 1965 and I have met people born in 1964, and they all shared the same uber-liberal viewpoint of all the other Baby Boomers, while I and others born in 1965 tend to be much more conservative, Reagan Republicans and the like. So I don't think the 64/65 divide is arbitrary or incorrect.

You left Gen Y out of your calculations, which is why your numbers are off. The Baby Boomers are the longest continuous generation, but they do share a lot of characteristics in common. Interestingly, I have no Baby Boomers in my immediate family. My parents were born before or during WWII and were the youngest in their families, and I'm the oldest of the next generation, born in 1965, so I have no aunts, uncles, cousins, or siblings who were born between 1945 and 1964. I did meet the daughter of the daughter of my great-aunt (2nd cousin?), and she was a few years older than me, so she would be a Boomer.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Purely anecdotal, but I was born in 1965 and I have met people born in 1964, and they all shared the same uber-liberal viewpoint of all the other Baby Boomers, while I and others born in 1965 tend to be much more conservative, Reagan Republicans and the like. So I don't think the 64/65 divide is arbitrary or incorrect.

You left Gen Y out of your calculations, which is why your numbers are off. The Baby Boomers are the longest continuous generation, but they do share a lot of characteristics in common. Interestingly, I have no Baby Boomers in my immediate family. My parents were born before or during WWII and were the youngest in their families, and I'm the oldest of the next generation, born in 1965, so I have no aunts, uncles, cousins, or siblings who were born between 1945 and 1964. I did meet the daughter of the daughter of my great-aunt (2nd cousin?), and she was a few years older than me, so she would be a Boomer.
To be honest, I would say 1959 are the last to be solid boomers. 1960-1964 are like Boomer X cusp, but I view them more as X. My mom was born in 1960, so I prefer seeing her as the head of Gen X rather than a tail end baby boomer. My dad was born three years before my mom, and he is the perfect boomer stereotype, and I see generation differences between both my parents. I end boomers at 1959 being that they were the last to be alive before Hawaii became a US state, the world population hit three billion, NASA's first space mission, Project Mercury happened, and were the last to leave adolescence, which I say ends at age twenty, before the world's first cellular network launched in 1979.
 

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To be honest, I would say 1959 are the last to be solid boomers. 1960-1964 are like Boomer X cusp, but I view them more as X. My mom was born in 1960, so I prefer seeing her as the head of Gen X rather than a tail end baby boomer. My dad was born three years before my mom, and he is the perfect boomer stereotype, and I see generation differences between both my parents. I end boomers at 1959 being that they were the last to be alive before Hawaii became a US state, the world population hit three billion, NASA's first space mission, Project Mercury happened, and were the last to leave adolescence, which I say ends at age twenty, before the world's first cellular network launched in 1979.
How does she vote, though? Someone born in 1960 would have grown up with the Nixon fiasco and Vietnam and George McGovern and the 1971 lowering of the voting age from 21 to 18. She could (theoretically) have voted in 1978 in the midterm elections and then in 1980 in the election between Reagan and Carter. What music does she listen to, 70s disco or 80s rock? Someone born in 1960 would have been a teenager starting in 1973, the age of the BeeGees and the Village People. Someone born in 1965 would have been a teenager starting in 1978, a year before disco died and just a few years before MTV started. What books did she read? Baby boomers read Jack Kerouac. Gen X'ers read Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. These aren't the only clues as to generational differences, but they are some of them.
 

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How does she vote, though? Someone born in 1960 would have grown up with the Nixon fiasco and Vietnam and George McGovern and the 1971 lowering of the voting age from 21 to 18. She could (theoretically) have voted in 1978 in the midterm elections and then in 1980 in the election between Reagan and Carter. What music does she listen to, 70s disco or 80s rock? Someone born in 1960 would have been a teenager starting in 1973, the age of the BeeGees and the Village People. Someone born in 1965 would have been a teenager starting in 1978, a year before disco died and just a few years before MTV started. What books did she read? Baby boomers read Jack Kerouac. Gen X'ers read Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. These aren't the only clues as to generational differences, but they are some of them.
Well, the thing is she is not into any of the things you mentioned. She is very much into English books, especially fairy tales set in England. She is not into disco. She is more into beethoven and mozart. I mean modern music actually sucks. 1960 were teenagers in 1980, when the first cellular network was already launched a year before, and 1960 were not preteens at the time Apollo 11 happened, while 1959 already were. Both began high school during the 70s, and were only able to graduate college in the 80s. Computers were a thing during both 1960s and 1965s childhood, and by the time both were teenagers, computers were already being used at home.
 

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Well, the thing is she is not into any of the things you mentioned. She is very much into English books, especially fairy tales set in England. She is not into disco. She is more into beethoven and mozart. I mean modern music actually sucks. 1960 were teenagers in 1980, when the first cellular network was already launched a year before, and 1960 were not preteens at the time Apollo 11 happened, while 1959 already were. Both began high school during the 70s, and were only able to graduate college in the 80s. Computers were a thing during both 1960s and 1965s childhood, and by the time both were teenagers, computers were already being used at home.
Several of those things are not true. Someone born in 1960 was no longer a teenager in 1980, s/he would have turned 20. Personal computers didn't come out until 1977, and only about 50K Apple IIs had been sold by 1980, so they did not figure in very many people's childhoods who were born in 1960. On the other hand, 8.2% of homes had a computer by 1984, when the 1965 babies turned 19, so if you didn't own a computer, you probably knew someone who did. (I did own one, of course, and was on my third by 1984.) The Electric Company on PBS was aimed at 7-10 year olds, and first aired in 1971, so someone born in 1960 would have been too old for it, theoretically, at least, while kids born in 1965 would have been the perfect age. All the Gen X'ers grew up with The Electric Company.
 

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If anything, it should actually start at 1962. Aside from Obama, most of the celebrities born in 1961 seem like typical boomers. With 1962 though, you start getting celebrities such as Jim Carrey and Axl Rose who are very x-ish
 

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Several of those things are not true. Someone born in 1960 was no longer a teenager in 1980, s/he would have turned 20. Personal computers didn't come out until 1977, and only about 50K Apple IIs had been sold by 1980, so they did not figure in very many people's childhoods who were born in 1960. On the other hand, 8.2% of homes had a computer by 1984, when the 1965 babies turned 19, so if you didn't own a computer, you probably knew someone who did. (I did own one, of course, and was on my third by 1984.) The Electric Company on PBS was aimed at 7-10 year olds, and first aired in 1971, so someone born in 1960 would have been too old for it, theoretically, at least, while kids born in 1965 would have been the perfect age. All the Gen X'ers grew up with The Electric Company.
1960 were actually 19 during the start of 1980. My mom turned 20 on October 26, 1980, so she was a teenager for nearly a full year of the 80s. 1960 were the first to still be in secondary high school after personal computers came out in high school since 1959 were the ones who graduated in 1977.
 

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If anything, it should actually start at 1962. Aside from Obama, most of the celebrities born in 1961 seem like typical boomers. With 1962 though, you start getting celebrities such as Jim Carrey and Axl Rose who are very x-ish
If you look at the 70s show, most of the main characters were born in 1960, and they are very Gen X. Of course, since it was aired twenty years after the time it was set, we cant really say they portrayed the 70s that accurately.
 
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