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I went to the University of London. I picked it for 3 reasons, all of approximately equal weight.

1. I wanted to study law, and I felt that proximity to the Royal Courts of Justice, plus the opportunity to meet with legal professionals and the proximity to the best solicitors firms and barristers chambers in the land would allow me greater opportunity to gain work experience whilst at uni. It did, and the gambit paid off. Today I am doing what I love.

2. I did not want to go to the university where the bulk of my school-colleagues were going. I was a young minority who attained a scholarship to one of the most prestigious private schools in the country. Most of my cohort were heading to one of the Oxbridge colleges, Durham or St Andrews. I was adamant that I had had enough of their company, and so I picked the University of London where very few of my cohort were looking to go.

3. Once I was at the University of London, I opted for Queen Mary, University of London as my college. The places where my school cohort were going are all hotbeds of right-wing student politics. The rank and file of the Tory party are recruited at Oxbridge, Durham and St Andrews. They are famous for being the promoters of today's neoliberal ideology. The University of London however, despite having just as good an academic pedigree is a hotbed of left wing student politics. The LSE birthed the Fabian Society, Queen Mary was a hub of social-democratic politics and Kings College London is the college of Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Effectively, the UoL has better politics than most other universities of its age and pedigree.
 

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I attended UCLA then USC (University of Southern California, not South Carolina):

Major factors:
- Prestige (Reputational weight of the academic program and college degree in the job market and/or for graduate school, access to renowned professors to study under and acquire letters of recommendation, etc.)
- Network (Powerful global alumni networks, robust career offices, exit opportunities, etc.)

Minor factors:
- Cost. Cost-benefit analysis was conducted to see how much I would make versus how much I would spend.

Not a factor:
- Location. I would go anywhere for the right university, I don't care about the college town or demographics. If Harvard were in Siberia I'd pack my polar bear coat and move.
- "Vibe" or "Fit". Don't care about the "fit." Prioritized what would place me in the best position to succeed. Confident that I would find people to relate to and befriend regardless.
 

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It's a 20 minute drive from where I live. Also significantly cheaper than a private school. State school, so they were required to accept me through funding agreements, and it was my first choice. Didn't go to any other campus tours, but I do regret not going to a couple of other schools. Both are private and cost three to five times more than my current school. Going through college paying in full with no loans or debts feels good.
 

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I chose my university for its three P's: proximity, prestige, and program. I didn't have to relocate (very far) in order to attend, it is consistently ranked in the top forty best universities in the world and top two best universities in Canada, and it offers an excellent program in my area of specialization.

I may relocate for grad school after next year but that remains to be seen. I would really rather not if I don't have to. Program and proximity are my two primary concerns, followed by prestige as a distant third. My education will not necessarily be of superior quality at a school which is ranked globally higher, especially because my field is rather niche, and I have no interest in paying for the name that gets printed on my diploma.
 
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I'm currently attending Johns Hopkins University (for undergrad, not the med school lol)

I really liked the neuroscience program here; it's one of the most popular majors on campus and I liked that I could specialize with a cognitive focus. I wanted to do research early as an undergrad and this is a great place for that. The campus is pretty, I wanted to be in a major city, and it's close enough to home that I could drive to move in. Oh, and the prestige/selectivity factor of course had some impact; though I was more concerned with being surrounded by intelligent and inspiring peers than I was worried about how my university would look on a resume.
 

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I didn't really choose it, not that I'm implying someone else did, but years prior to applying I realized I could not afford to go anywhere else. My university is entirely free for me and I'm essentially paid to study. This was not a factor in my choice at the time but my bachelor's degree on it's own is pretty useless in terms of jobs, so I'm glad I'm not going into debt because of it. My choice(s) for graduate school are different, it depends on the availability of the program, the curriculum, certain aspects of the program, the university itself, location and cost (not for all of them, it depends).
 

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That's a good question! I always knew I wanted a prestigious, small, liberal arts school. After I was rejected from my dream school (still a little salty) and all the Ivies I applied to (not salty at all), I needed to really evaluate my expectations. It was between UVA and the school I go to now (no way I'm telling y'all on here lmao). UVA gave me financial aid in the form of loans, while my current school gave me money in the form of grants, so the decision was kind of made.

I wouldn't have fit in at UVA, anyway. It's a lovely school, but I wanted a small liberal arts college, right? Which UVA is not. And I'm very happy at my school now. Sure, it wasn't my dream, or whatever. But I can't imagine myself anywhere else. I've taken classes in such a wide variety of subjects, met incredible people, and have wonderful opportunities. I'm spending the summer studying at Cambridge, in the UK. My school is also very well renowned for its political science program, which I am a part of.
 
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Because community colleges are seriously underrated and worth it depending on your major. The one I'm going to is pretty nice, actually.
I am able to pay out pf pocket for each semester and still live at home, making it a good option since I'm not accumulating any debt. I've chosen culinary arts, specifically a pastry/baking certification. It should be nice along with my art degree, I want to be a cake chef and maybe someday design wedding cakes :)
But I'm comfortable starting at the bottom and aquiring the experience first.
 
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Because community colleges are seriously underrated and worth it depending on your major. The one I'm going to is pretty nice, actually.
I am able to pay out pf pocket for each semester and still live at home, making it a good option since I'm not accumulating any debt. I've chosen culinary arts, specifically a pastry/baking certification. It should be nice along with my art degree, I want to be a cake chef and maybe someday design wedding cakes :)
But I'm comfortable starting at the bottom and aquiring the experience first.
culinary school sounds cool!...how much time do you spend in the kitchen vs in the classroom?...do tests include baking challenges, like tv?...what is that like? ;)

and do you think anyone can learn to bake or is there a special talent?...I imagine anyone can learn to be competent but some people have a special talent...do you agree and how would you describe that talent?
 

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culinary school sounds cool!...how much time do you spend in the kitchen vs in the classroom?...do tests include baking challenges, like tv?...what is that like? ;)
I'm a first semester student so I haven't gotten to take baking yet.... but I'm taking two classes and one is basic food prep.

The class is long, and goes from 8AM-12:30ish. The first hour or two is lecture then during the rest of the class we cook and cleanup. For the final exam we have created small menu with a meat/entree, a starch, a vegetable, and a dessert or bread. And I'm gonna have to cook it all during that class session.

So far I've gotten to cook veggies, pork loin, I "fabricated" a chicken (meaning I cut a whole chicken into the common sections), I made a fancy salad and sandwich, did some rice risotto, made two sauces, and made vinaigrette. The class is its own functioning kitchen, basically. Grading for the day is based on presentation, taste/"doneness", proper sanitation/safety, and efficiency with both time/ingredients. I guess it is sort of like TV, we are given a goal for the day (ex: cook poultry + a starch) but can use whatever is in the walk-in fridge and either bring a recipe or make one up as we go. It pretty difficult, I'm average at cooking and some of the students in class are way ahead in terms of culinary skills. I get anxious during the cooking segment of class, but atleast I'm acing all the weekly tests :proud:

My second class is all lecture on sanitation and safety. A bit boring, but its not difficult information at all. Very basic, common sense type stuff. If you've ever taken a food handlers class to get a permit, its basically like that.

As for "if anyone can bake", I think so, but there's also different levels of baking. I haven't acquired any skills that are specific only to baking yet, but I think most would be able to learn it at the basic level. I'm aiming for high level baking, I'm hoping my art background will be of use to me when it comes to the presentation/decorating aspects. I'm a bit clueless and ungraceful in the new kitchen environment, but once the learning curve kicks in I'll be fine. I do think some people are naturally good cooks, I'm not naturally talented though, otherwise I would've gone for a full culinary degree.
 
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I have always been fascinated by science in general, particularly human physiology and chemistry. However, I have always found math difficult. I decided to get a degree in nursing and work my way through medicine, but I got a government funded scholarship and the degree that is permissible under the scholarship is limited. I took the course which I and my bestfriend and other close friends agreed to take and that was chemical engineering. (I knew back then that engineering has a lot of hard math and I took that as a challenge) However feeling betrayed, my bestfriend took the course in another university; and during my 1st year as a chemical engineering student I found my friends both unwilling and less able to coach me with my difficulty in math. They survived chemistry but I relatively excel in it (even though of persistent lateness in classes, homeworks and less time to read). I realized I can't depend on them for a long time, I have to sustain myself. I really admired my chemistry laboratory teacher back then, she was amazing and teaches chemistry in a very intersting way, halfway through my 2nd semester I asked her about real job of a chemist in the industry and I was enlightened. (I had misconceptions about being a chemist back then)

I transferred to a degree in chemistry amidst belittling from my former chemical engineering colleagues that chemists are just assistant to chemical engineers and possibility of losing my scholarship due to irregular course units. Math wasn't that emphasized (or I just gave it so little interest, hence my low grades in advanced physics and 3 physical chemistry courses), I relatively exceled in biochemistry and organic chemistry. I positioned my thesis to biochemistry, a field I found that is the perfect marriage of medicine and chemistry. I later worked in the industry for almost 4years in fields much closer to other fields of chemistry, but my interest remained the same. I just quit my job and found myself again in the path I have always wanted to be.

I realized focusing on your strengths plays a significant role in your career but you have to have passion to get all the way through it.
Good luck!
 

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1. It's the best (in my country) when it comes to everything STEM related.

That's pretty much it. I didn't really need to put more thought into it than that. I have never regretted my decision, I love it here.
 

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Beer Guardian
ENTP 5w6 So/Sx 584 ILE Honorary INTJ
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A woman (who broke up with me my freshman year). Typical.
 
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Undergrad:

I didn't want to move away from home, and it's the university in my city. It's also where my mom went to school. I didn't really think about it much, I just applied, got in, and went. The fact that it wasn't competitive to get into helped, because I'm not a competitive person. It just needed to be more respectable than the community college.

Grad:

They accepted me lol. That's basically why. I had planned to plan to apply to about 5 places. The first was by far the most prestigious, and I had always dreamed of going there as a kid. I used it as a practice application, since I had no feeling that I'd actually get accepted. I had just submitted my second wave of applications and was preparing my third ones when I got the acceptance email.

It was by far my preferred of all five, and the fact that I was accepted somewhere made me retract my other applications and stop working on the unsubmitted ones. I was just relieved to get in somewhere, and was happy it was my top pick.
 

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Because it's the closest to where I live.

People here don't move to other cities, much less states, very often to go to university. If you have a good one locally, that's where you go because it makes no difference.
 
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