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Why is it that I type/write better when I would drink? I mean, I know alcohol is a top anxiety reliever, but I wish I knew of a different strategy that doesn't involve putting poison into my body. When I used to type away while drunk, the words would flow through my mind with such ease! Nowadays, I type sober, but my anxiety and perfectionism causes me to type at a choppy pace, trying to find the perfect word(s) that I want to use. Is this just a natural problem that I must overcome with practice? Is Kratom something I should consider using? If so, any specific kind for recommendation?? Can somebody flip my perfectionism switch to OFF? The switch is right below my thoracic vertebra. Thank you for your time!
 

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As an exercise, try free writing for around a half hour everyday. Write down anything that comes to mind, and organize it afterwards as best you can. Pick out relevant sentences and thoughts, then expand upon them for at least 5-7 sentences articulating the details, structure and reasoning of why you wrote that down. If need be, for a more intensive exercise, go here (365 Thought Provoking Questions to Ask Yourself This Year) and answer all the questions. It becomes great material to string off of in order to build a better base for writing at times. I'll let you in on a little secret, ever see an original manuscript for celebrated novels? Most of them are messy as fuck, though organized to a degree, with notes and scratches all over the place. Many great authors struggle from the same thing you do, all it takes is a little persistence, dedication to the craft, and loosening up your creative muscles to actually work. In short, tell your perfectionistic switch to go screw a pooch and consider everything a work in progress......even if it is published, finished, or shelved for later.
 

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"He wrote his best stuff in rehab. Still does."

I've heard that a lot about writers, that they work best with the bottle. Perhaps it's the, "f*ck it, good enough" state of mind that allows works to be finished rather than obsessed over and second guessed. Actually now that I think about it, my drive to write faded around the time I stopped drinking..I never really completed much but I started...well, something, a few times.
 

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Fi is a examining function - it takes all external inputs and judges them based on your personal value system.

Since Fi is our primary trait, it usually dominates our thought process. Sure, our Ne is strong and brings metaphors, examples, and other good things into our prose, but Fi is the pair of glasses that we see everything through. It slices and dices everything on the page, complaining that it doesn't have the correct cadence, uses a word that has slight connotations which are off, disrupts the flow of reading, conveys the improper emotion or doesn't convey enough emotion, etc.

A good way to 'let it flow' is not to give Fi a chance to judge it - hide what you are typing/writing so you can't read it and have your Fi go off on it.

Another way is to 'force yourself' into an Ne dominant mode through practice and exercises, as stated above. You do this by actively suppressing your evaluation of things while letting your words flow (consciously ignoring your Fi while exercising Ne). This takes a certain amount of energy and practice, as you get extremely embarrassed of whatever you wrote the first few times - and then you learn to ignore that feeling and just plow through.

Finally, I think Fi evaluates more than just how you say it - it evaluates the content of what you say. Sometimes Fi stops your words from coming out, but other times Fi is stopping your ideas from flowing out as well. Your ideas fundamentally get judged through Fi as well and need to go through its pruning. So while you are trying to write, you will experience not only a writer's block in how you say it, but even in what your idea (theme, storyline, hypothesis, etc) is.

I get this a lot when thinking up storylines - the one I develop works and ties things together, but my Fi is not satisfied and wants to throw in curveballs or make the story more plausible or put in more suspense, action, drama, chaos, mystery, etc. So it is like I'm fighting two walls at once - trying to follow the storyline that I've decided on but getting judged both at the style of writing and where the story is heading. Very hard to get anything written in that state.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Everybody's insight and advice are great, but I've just realized that I completely forgot to add that I also write/type better when I am sad, as well. Hence, the alcohol is a depressant, which makes me sensitive and my Fe function begins to glare, allowing me to connect to my writing on a different level. This is something I wrote back in 2008, right before my life-threatening car accident that I got into and when I was going through an alcoholic problem during this time... Does it not mystify the mind everytime it thinks about what could've happened or what would've happened if one's self took a different path or made a different choice in their past? Wonder is but a curious thought withheld from the actual truth that lies on the other side of the wall, in which it sometimes can never be reached. Chance follows any cause of event that can be controlled and that has the probability of anything happening. Taking chances and acting upon creates an opportunity to get you on the other side of the wall and to behold what has become of the wonder that was once unreal. By doing this, One's self cannot control their own fate but can take different paths that will eventually lead them to their intended destination to the road to inevitably predetermined, destiny.
 

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Maybe it just seems like your writing is better when you have been drinking? Alcohol fills people with self confidence. It makes them perceive themselves as attractive, to be invincible etc. It switches off your critical faculties. Maybe when you are sober, you are viewing your work in a critical manner which makes you think that it's not up to standard, but it may also be helping you to do a better job? Criticism is essential for improvement.

Also, if you need some form of drug in order to be creative, then your creativity has become dependent on drugs. That's the last thing you want! Your brain is a beautiful thing and intoxicants will only reduce its functioning, especially in the long term.

One piece of advice I can give you is when you first start writing, just blurt your thoughts out onto the paper. Don't worry about accuracy or wording, just write. When you are done, you can go back over it and fiddle around with the wording until it's the way you want it to be.
 

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I have the same issue, things seem to flow better when I've had a few drinks in me, whether that's music or writing. There's two ways to look at it, and I've considered both sides. On one hand, the view is that it's not good long term, and you can be creative without drugs/alcohol. This is a good argument, although I have yet to come across a great artist who was completely sober, or who created better art or art just as good as when they were not sober. John Coltrane is the only exception, but he meditated alot, and that in itself can be a kind of natural drug.

The other view is that it's a risk just like any other profession. If you are a journalist in a war zone, you risk capture, torture, being killed. If you are a professional athlete, you risk serious injury over the years, ect. People die all the time for their country, for their beliefs, for their loved ones, so why not for art? If that is your mission, your purpose in life, doesn't it make more sense to be willing to die for it? Now, not all artists are going to drink themselves to death or overdose or kill themselves, but the fact that they take on the risks, to bring the art to fruition, I think is courageous and bold.

Now, here's what I've done. I've started experimenting with creativity and the way my mind works when I'm drinking or high or something, although I rarely smoke weed anymore. I try to map out connections, sentence structure, phrase structure, harmonic movement, rhythm and flow of notes and words, ect. I do that after a few drinks and then make a note of where I am going mentally, or physically if I'm playing guitar. And then I try to recreate that when I'm sober. It's a good exercise.

Deep meditation also works, but you have to be really present with the art. You have to gain a love of being spontaneous, or risk, and daring, and I think half of what it is is losing that fear and inhibition to say what you really want to say. The other half is the inspiration, and accentuating the inspiration already in you.

That being said, I can guarantee you any great artist was not solely reliant on drugs/alcohol. There was alot of talent, practice, persistence, and struggle to perfect the craft. They would have been a solid artist without it, but it was a tool that helped them tap into the next level.

If you want to go that route, you have to be willing to take the risks though. Poe died a poor and unknown alcoholic writer on a street. O. Henry died a poor alcoholic as well, and Fitzgerald's alcoholism led to his early death at the age of 44. Joyce, Bukowski, and Faulkner were also heavy drinkers, but no one can doubt their talent, influence, and legacy.

As Hemingway, a drinker himself put it, "Write drunk, edit sober." I'll drink to that.
 

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Why is it that I type/write better when I would drink? I mean, I know alcohol is a top anxiety reliever, but I wish I knew of a different strategy that doesn't involve putting poison into my body. When I used to type away while drunk, the words would flow through my mind with such ease! Nowadays, I type sober, but my anxiety and perfectionism causes me to type at a choppy pace, trying to find the perfect word(s) that I want to use. Is this just a natural problem that I must overcome with practice? Is Kratom something I should consider using? If so, any specific kind for recommendation?? Can somebody flip my perfectionism switch to OFF? The switch is right below my thoracic vertebra. Thank you for your time!
I wonder if you have some kind of pain memory in your mind which stops you from just going ahead and writing. I was watching a documentary on acupuncture, and it mentioned that we have a region in our brain which actually hold the memory of pain itself. When pins are stuck into various region of the body, it deactivates these pain areas. I wondered if alcohol actually makes our mind more lucid, and forget the pain region of our minds.

I know sometimes when I think too much, or I hold onto a painful memory, such that, it gives me a strong headache and "fear" ? But I have come to learn that if I talk to myself internally, not to "rationalise" by the thought, but I "talk" like a story line inside my heart, the pain goes away from my head ! lol.... I think this is another form of Ne you know. Or thinking and feeling happy feelings, therefore also induces happy thoughts and brainstorming as well.

I wonder if you could do meditation or yoga in order to release these kind of memories in your mind.
I know I started to drink coffee once a while too, to reduce the pained areas in my mind.

These days, it also helps for me to not continually bombard my mind with more info, all at once, this gives me a headache as well I came to realise.
 

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Hello,
I used to write drunk all the time. Then, I got sober. I lost all of my creativity for a while. I had to come to terms with the fact that I don't get to control when I am inspired.

Also, alcohol releases inhibitions. Now that I am sober I have to address what is keeping me inhibited and actually process it. It has been (and keeps being) my experience that my perfectionism is "fear in a dress". When I am fearful about letting my real self out, then my artistic expression is inhibited. My need for perfection becomes almost neurotic. In order to let it flow, I have to address the fear that is stifling me.

For the longest time I wrote about writing. I realize it sounds weird but it worked. After a few minutes the anxiety would process and I would just slowly transition into writing about I had originally intended to write about.

Hope this helps...
 
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