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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An inquisitive question. I'm not knocking the major or anything, but looking at colleges, it’s apparently among the top 10 most popular majors.
If it’s one of the most popular majors, wouldn't that mean the field is over saturated? What is the usual goal for someone with a Communications degree?
Any here who are Communications majors? What did you learn?
 

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If it’s one of the most popular majors, wouldn't that mean the field is over saturated?
Not necessarily. The question is how many jobs where a Communications degree could be useful are created each year. Chances are this is relatively high though I can question how well do those with Communications degrees understand what skills they have should lead them into a couple of different fields as I see both Marketing and HR as being ways one could go with a Communications degree.

What is the usual goal for someone with a Communications degree?
This I don't know but I would think there is a few possible ideas:

1. HR - Corporate communications could be one department that some people with this degree may go and be one of those people that reviews memos and makes sure corporate messaging is consistent and proper.

2. Marketing - This would be in the advertising side mainly where the copy has to be verified as being correct for the given medium and message.

3. Management - While not exactly an obvious route, I could imagine someone with a Communications degree going on to get an MBA and then have a mix of business administration and communication in their background that could be advantageous.

Any here who are Communications majors? What did you learn?
No, I have a B. Math degree but these would be my ideas of what someone could do with the degree if it covers some of the more intriguing areas like Neuro-Linguistic Programming and other psychological components that may be a bit trippy to some people. I have no formal education in NLP though I am a fan of ways to apply ideas from it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not necessarily. The question is how many jobs where a Communications degree could be useful are created each year. Chances are this is relatively high though I can question how well do those with Communications degrees understand what skills they have should lead them into a couple of different fields as I see both Marketing and HR as being ways one could go with a Communications degree.



This I don't know but I would think there is a few possible ideas:

1. HR - Corporate communications could be one department that some people with this degree may go and be one of those people that reviews memos and makes sure corporate messaging is consistent and proper.

2. Marketing - This would be in the advertising side mainly where the copy has to be verified as being correct for the given medium and message.

3. Management - While not exactly an obvious route, I could imagine someone with a Communications degree going on to get an MBA and then have a mix of business administration and communication in their background that could be advantageous.



No, I have a B. Math degree but these would be my ideas of what someone could do with the degree if it covers some of the more intriguing areas like Neuro-Linguistic Programming and other psychological components that may be a bit trippy to some people. I have no formal education in NLP though I am a fan of ways to apply ideas from it.
In my area [NY metro] it does seem like the jobs where a Communications/Journalism/English degree is needed are plentiful.

You have a point about advertising, even though that could fall under marketing. Communications majors seem to learn much about networking and social media, which are nowadays huge channels for advertising.

After researching it quite a bit, I was just wondering why Communications has always been viewed as a fatuous degree, not to be taken seriously.
 

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After researching it quite a bit, I was just wondering why Communications has always been viewed as a fatuous degree, not to be taken seriously.
While you didn't ask it, I thought I'd offer up a couple of points about it:

Commonality - As everyone communicates on a daily basis, this trivializes the subject to some degree. Consider if someone got a degree in "Interpersonal studies" as how many jobs list having "Excellent communication skills" or "Strong Interpersonal skills" in the requirements section for the job? Another point here is that there isn't a stereotype for a Communications major. A Computer Science graduate may well be a Geek, Doctors and Lawyers have their stereotype image but a Communications grad? Not quite there.

Lack of the challenge - Where for a lot of other degrees there can be that point where most would go, "I couldn't do that," I doubt this exists when thinking of Communications. Surgeons doing a surgery, physicists studying subatomic particles, actuaries dealing with all those statistics all day long would be various examples of things that can put some subjects up in terms of being seen as intellectually hard. Athletes and artists perform various physical actions that could be seen as, "Whoa, I can't do that," for a couple of other pieces here. Communications doesn't have that same automatic association for a lot of people.
 

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@CaféZeitgeist

1. Party major - like psychology. People study it so they can study something light while partying

2.

1. HR - Corporate communications could be one department that some people with this degree may go and be one of those people that reviews memos and makes sure corporate messaging is consistent and proper.

2. Marketing - This would be in the advertising side mainly where the copy has to be verified as being correct for the given medium and message.

3. Management - While not exactly an obvious route, I could imagine someone with a Communications degree going on to get an MBA and then have a mix of business administration and communication in their background that could be advantageous.
This makes sense especially 1 & 2.

I can see someone who has studied how to communicate and get a response they want being hired for a marketing department.

Someone who can ask the right questions (HR person definitely is in position to do so), read body language, maybe even read personality tendencies and abilities might be hired for an HR deparment.

3. If 2 is true, they may just want choice or not be sure of what they want to do as a job during college, so such a degree allows multiple paths.

4. Like management, marketing, law, it's a non technical field that has high pay. Like the other 3 fields, if you're an organized and effective person with good people skills, you can earn lots of money.
 
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