Personality Cafe banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
With a ridiculous competitive market to get into a decent college backed by an even more ridiculous job market that almost requires a degree for you to work at a fast food restaraunt, I am going to say this now.

While going to college (or if you aren't in college; the earlier the better) GET AS MUCH EXPERIENCE AS YOU CAN BY ACTUALLY WORKING.

Too many kids are graduating universities like Harvard and Yale and expecting to start off making six figures and not working a day in their lives. If you are going to college and you aren't working at an internship relevant in your field of interest or attempting to get experience in your field of interest then you are making a foolish financial mistake. Have fun not getting hired.

Of course, it is all about WHO you know, not WHAT you know, but aside from that I highly recommend you start working, reading, and applying for internships regarding your specific field of pay. Remember kids; 4 year unpaid internships is just another word for slavery :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,659 Posts
Cooperative education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia would be something to consider within programs that will provide what you are talking about that may be useful to note here.
That's basically how I got an early start. My high school had a Youth Apprenticeship program. I did it for IT and started a job doing IT work at the local public library for 15 hours a week. Then funding ended for that so I got a job at the local trucking company my senior year doing IT work for them. They were a bigger company and I impressed my bosses enough they were going to pay 100% of my college (got shot down by HR but still got 50%). I started working full time there the week I turned 18 and worked full time through college. I got my bachelor's degree on the express route (2.5 years) and basically coming out had basically 3 years of full time experience and a degree.

It would be nice to see those programs expanded because I know a lot of people, like myself, who got an early start in some sort of job, especially in the trades. I was also paid pretty well overall. I made $10 (this was 2006) an hour as a senior in high school. Then for college it went to $12 and then $12.75 an hour so I did pretty well overall. The whole unpaid internships are such crap.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
Too many kids are graduating universities like Harvard and Yale and expecting to start off making six figures and not working a day in their lives. If you are going to college and you aren't working at an internship relevant in your field of interest or attempting to get experience in your field of interest then you are making a foolish financial mistake. Have fun not getting hired.
I'm pretty sure people who make six figures have to work every day for that money just like the rest of us. Also I'm pretty sure it takes a lot of hard work to get into and succeed at Harvard and Yale.

And what happens to all the people who decide they don't like what they're doing and switch career fields after college? I guess by your estimation they're all screwed. And the people who decide to move to an area where they don't know anyone are even more screwed because "it's all about who you know, not what you know."

Just curious, what happened to you in your life to make you so cynical and prone to sweeping proclamations?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,028 Posts
OP's remark has plenty of merit

with the huge number of Gen Y'ers with college degree, it's really no longer a major source of competitive advantage since the market is overflowing with college degree wielding grads...actual work experience can take you a long way towards differentiating yourself from your competitors

To all those still in college, heed the OP's advice....or reality may slap you in the face reaaaally hard
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,187 Posts
If your grades are suffering because you have trouble juggling work experience demands and academic expectations--that kind of situation will not look good in the eyes of some employers. Some employers believe that good grades (often) reflect hard work, perseverance, good time management skills as well as critical thinking and communication skills.

Another thing: it's not 'impossible' to get a job in your chosen field if you have no work experience after graduating--but you might experience some delay getting a professional career started if you're looking to earn a 'secure' wage or salary in the middle to upper income bracket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
784 Posts
I always tell people still in college to try and get work experience while they have campus resources. Volunteer, intern.... Do something beyond just going to class and then going home everyday. Go talk to your department advisor about any potential opportunities.

I interned with a US Senator for six months (In DC and in her local office back home) while earning college credit for the experience. It helped land me my current job now that I am graduated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I have an Ivy League degree and work experience in my field at three institutions, two of which are world-famous, and I can't even get a job as a lab tech making less than 30K a year.
Ultimately, it truly is all about who you know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
I'm pretty sure people who make six figures have to work every day for that money just like the rest of us. Also I'm pretty sure it takes a lot of hard work to get into and succeed at Harvard and Yale.

And what happens to all the people who decide they don't like what they're doing and switch career fields after college? I guess by your estimation they're all screwed. And the people who decide to move to an area where they don't know anyone are even more screwed because "it's all about who you know, not what you know."

Just curious, what happened to you in your life to make you so cynical and prone to sweeping proclamations?
Where did I ever state that people earning six figures don't work? I was referring to the self-entitled youth and merely used Ivy League as an example. No, people are not screwed if they change careers and they are smart when they go about changing it. Yes, people who move into an area without knowing anyone are less likely to succeed than someone who knows people in said field.

I completely forgot about this thread btw haha
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,869 Posts
I'm pretty sure people who make six figures have to work every day for that money just like the rest of us. Also I'm pretty sure it takes a lot of hard work to get into and succeed at Harvard and Yale.

And what happens to all the people who decide they don't like what they're doing and switch career fields after college? I guess by your estimation they're all screwed. And the people who decide to move to an area where they don't know anyone are even more screwed because "it's all about who you know, not what you know."

Just curious, what happened to you in your life to make you so cynical and prone to sweeping proclamations?
I have to agree with the OP, even if it isn't put in the nicest way; it's put in the most honest and blunt way.

Having hired a lot of people myself in the past, I must say college experience is a risk to work off of, but a work history of "having worked for two years minimum at each job" is an almost sure snag.

Of course, for the most part I wasn't hiring for positions that required higher education. But work ethic is highly indicated by a person's loyalty to their job (it indicates they didn't get fired for being lazy, calling out a lot, etc., and they will stay with the company for a few years).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
But work ethic is highly indicated by a person's loyalty to their job (it indicates they didn't get fired for being lazy, calling out a lot, etc., and they will stay with the company for a few years).
This. Work ethic goes a long way. That is what has gotten me pretty much all of my jobs; give it 100 percent and do your job well no matter what. No task is "above" you; cleaning toilets, making food, cleaning kitchens, it needs to be done and done well. Same goes for "higher" end jobs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sriracha

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,659 Posts
Of course, for the most part I wasn't hiring for positions that required higher education. But work ethic is highly indicated by a person's loyalty to their job (it indicates they didn't get fired for being lazy, calling out a lot, etc., and they will stay with the company for a few years).
Sad thing is there isn't loyalty to one's job. Basically when you're hired, you're an expense to be minimized. Raises and everything else are kept to a minimum and even promotions you get less of a raise than you would going to a different company. It's sad that you can stay somewhere long term without falling way behind. I guess 2+ years is a good guideline to follow. I've been at my current job almost 3 years. I did have a short stint of 8 months at my previous job but the job before that I had over 3 years. Not too bad considering I'm 24 and those 3 jobs are all in IT.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
I have to agree with the OP, even if it isn't put in the nicest way; it's put in the most honest and blunt way.

Having hired a lot of people myself in the past, I must say college experience is a risk to work off of, but a work history of "having worked for two years minimum at each job" is an almost sure snag.

Of course, for the most part I wasn't hiring for positions that required higher education. But work ethic is highly indicated by a person's loyalty to their job (it indicates they didn't get fired for being lazy, calling out a lot, etc., and they will stay with the company for a few years).
What about college experience with unrelated internship experience in a different field, but really good recommendations from those supervisors?

Also, would you agree with the assessment that you "need connections to get a job"? If I were a candidate looking for a job (which I am), what would you advise would be the best way for me to connect with people whose organizations/work I was interested in, but who I didn't know personally?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,659 Posts
Also, would you agree with the assessment that you "need connections to get a job"? If I were a candidate looking for a job (which I am), what would you advise would be the best way for me to connect with people whose organizations/work I was interested in, but who I didn't know personally?
Networking events with people in your field. I know I will drive 140 miles to Madison to participate in High Tech Happy Hour. Also LinkedIn works well too. Participate in groups there.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,806 Posts
Networking events with people in your field. I know I will drive 140 miles to Madison to participate in High Tech Happy Hour. Also LinkedIn works well too. Participate in groups there.
But how long does it take to make these connections? Months? And how do you maintain the connections after the event?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,659 Posts
But how long does it take to make these connections? Months? And how do you maintain the connections after the event?
I connect with them on LinkedIn and occasionally send a message. I also see them at future High Tech Happy Hours. I guess Madison might be different because it has a very close-knit IT community. I'm assuming other cities also have it. It takes months to foster good relationships but you need to start planting the seeds for anything to grow. The key is don't be forceful and the best time to foster relationships is when you aren't in need of something immediately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I connect with them on LinkedIn and occasionally send a message. I also see them at future High Tech Happy Hours. I guess Madison might be different because it has a very close-knit IT community. I'm assuming other cities also have it. It takes months to foster good relationships but you need to start planting the seeds for anything to grow. The key is don't be forceful and the best time to foster relationships is when you aren't in need of something immediately.
I used LinkedIn and within the first 2 weeks I got a job offer at Madison Square Garden to help out at the different restaraunts there. It most definitely is a helpful tool, though I must say I haven't been on it in quite a while 0.0
 
  • Like
Reactions: PowerShell

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,659 Posts
I used LinkedIn and within the first 2 weeks I got a job offer at Madison Square Garden to help out at the different restaraunts there. It most definitely is a helpful tool, though I must say I haven't been on it in quite a while 0.0
Even Facebook is a good tool. I've met a few contacts there. I'm a bit more cautious to use FB for business networking since there's a bit more personal stuff on there. Heck I have even made contacts before on programming\computer forums. The biggest thing is it takes time to get to know people.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top