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Feel free to agree, disagree, or provide additional examples of "wisdom and the INTJ".

I read a lot here from INTJs that wonder how to structure their thoughts in ways that can benefit them--how to apply their processing style to the accumulation of wisdom.

This guy is perhaps one of the wisest and most amazing INTJ 5w6 men on the planet. (Just as an intro I'll link Charlie Munger's 1 minute comment when asked about Donald Trump). He's 88 years old now, he's crusty, but it's fun to see the way he answers, and the knowing in his eyes, and the extreme self restraint he shows. And it shows that INTJs don't have to be socially comfortable or compromised to be wise, useful, or influential.

Munger is the man behind Warren Buffett. Warren directly cites this INTJ, and his remarkable skill, as one of the main things that helped him become so successful. His method may well be called, "how to use your INTJness to build a multi-billion dollar empire and not even care about the money". Want to know what world domination in an INTJ looks like? That's Charlie. And he has given lectures for decades that essentially tell INTJs how to follow in his footsteps, just not in MBTI language.

Munger speaks rarely, but when he does it's all Te. Most of his public appearances are lectures or interviews. The crux of all his teaching rests on a concept that can transform an INTJ in amazing ways--organizing complex systems into "mental models" that can make you a powerful contributor to whatever it is you want to dominate. It's using systems thinking to turn the world on it's head. I know it can be valuable because hooking into Munger when I was in my coming of age is a major source for whatever good has come from my academic and professional career.

I'll link his one minute comment on Trump, then a graduation speech he gave at USC (starts at 4 minutes). Lastly I'll leave a link to read one of his foundational pieces on mental models. This is just a small sample of



To Read:
Charles Munger: A Lesson on Elementary, Worldly Wisdom As It Relates To Investment Management & Business | The Big Picture
 

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Wow.

Thanks for sharing.

I just saw this:
Something about the way he says "I hope so" at the end makes me laugh.
She is asking questions and not getting the answers she wants, because she is not asking what she really wants to ask.

I love the way he answers in a "Duh, it's pretty obvious" way that subtly shows he has such deep knowledge.

I couldn't actually watch the first video you shared - it is not available to my country.
 

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Wow.

Thanks for sharing.

I just saw this:
Something about the way he says "I hope so" at the end makes me laugh.
She is asking questions and not getting the answers she wants, because she is not asking what she really wants to ask.

I love the way he answers in a "Duh, it's pretty obvious" way that subtly shows he has such deep knowledge.

I couldn't actually watch the first video you shared - it is not available to my country.
I agree with the "I hope so". Classic Munger. He's got that extremely dry and bloody-nose wit. That first video is kind of the same thing--he knows deeply what he things but refuses to say it all, but the 20 words or so he uses convey a book's worth of insight. I'll try to relink it. Most of the benefit from Munger comes in the written transcripts of his lectures. For years I had never bumped into another human that had read even a single one, and I was just fine with that. It was a deep advantage for me. But ultimately he is, perhaps, one of the greatest treasures for an INTJ that is ready to get to work, and as such, I didn't want to avoid sharing here.

Try this link instead:
Munger on Trump: 'Stark raving mad' - Video - Business News
 

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I aspire to be like Munger in many ways. Thanks for sharing. It is refreshing to see our traits used in a positive manner, although perhaps it's just his station in life that makes it so. When I give condescending "Well, duh" looks it comes across just as such...condescending. When he does it, it comes across as masterful. So, I wonder if it's a matter of delivery or contextual status.
 

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I aspire to be like Munger in many ways. Thanks for sharing. It is refreshing to see our traits used in a positive manner, although perhaps it's just his station in life that makes it so. When I give condescending "Well, duh" looks it comes across just as such...condescending. When he does it, it comes across as masterful. So, I wonder if it's a matter of delivery or contextual status.
It's interesting. In his USC speech (linked above) he talks about something that he hasn't addressed much before. He talks about how he had to learn not to threaten people above him even though he had the right answers and they had missed it. It wasn't a long portion, but it's one of the few times Munger has ever addressed it directly. He was always a very direct guy and it certainly took some managing. He suggests that wisdom is knowing when and how to act when you know you've got it right and the guys above you don't.
 

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He suggests that wisdom is knowing when and how to act when you know you've got it right and the guys above you don't.
That's very strategically valid. It requires an ability to set aside one's own ego for the sake of the project (or whatever it may be)...something I reckon is difficult for us INTJs to do.
 
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