Personality Cafe banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, newcomer to Personality Cafe here. Thanks for clicking.:proud:

I tested myself twice and based on what I'm reading as well as test results I'm pretty sure that I am an INFJ. Lately I've been going around and trying different things, see if anything is worth pursuing because lately I've become quite listless and without an interest. :frustrating:

My previous teacher was a huge theater and especially Shakespeare buff, and he had us often act out scenes and understand the emotions of the characters that we portrayed. I found the exercises extremely interesting and engrossing. We acted out many scenes from the Tempest, and a brief act as Prospero made me pretty darn sure that I was cut out for this kind of stuff. [Some classmates clapped, I was so mortified :kitteh:]

The thing is, I am quite an introverted person. I'm quite shy, and when people initially meet me, they often find me kind of cold and uninterested. I don't mean to be abrasive. I'm sure many of you face similar problems. :confused: I want to get less awkward in social situations. I find that once I get to know people (maybe a week in a row of interaction) I talk a lot. Words flow easily, and often you'll find a nugget or two of [irritating] sarcastic humor of mine...

Anyways. I've wondered if any of you are actors/aspiring actors of both theater and camera work (which I'd rather pursue.), and if you've heard of any INFJ actors. I've read of a few successful INFJ ones, including Carrie Fisher, whom I admire greatly. :D
Thanks!

--raconteur
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,147 Posts
I'd say my only "real" acting experience is me improvising a character at a party. If I met someone for the first time I'd invent a character on the spot and talk to them as the character just to see how far I could take it and whether they believed me. It might also have been a coping mechanism for me being out of my comfort zone. :tongue: If me and a few friends are trying to play a trick on another friend I'm usually the last one or one of the last people to burst out laughing.

So... I'm kind of good at it, but in my own way.

I helped film a short film (a terrible one) last year too. It was a Bear Grylls gone wrong type thing so it required me to be a character AND a cameraman. I just prefer to film things...

To answer your question, I don't think one specific type can be good or bad at acting. Maybe you're just really good at it. :happy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
643 Posts
I think so. For me anyways, I feel like I act all the time around my friends as a way for them to like me. So acting would just be like one of my normal social "duties" :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
915 Posts
Sure. I could think of quite a few INFJs that have took to the stage. :) Maybe it's a way to feel comfortable to act. I think I wouldn't mind acting crazy (or is it acting?:p)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
222 Posts
Our ability to *really* empathise means many of us could well be able to bring a complex mix of emotions to the surface to really get into a role.
I have loved acting since I was little, and it has always come easily for me :)
I believe Tilda Swinton and Michelle Pfeiffer are INFJs.. (Someone correct me if I'm wrong :p)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Probably, though Stage Fright seems common in this type.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,195 Posts
My best acting experience was as MacBeth in my senior year of high school. I personally took on the lead role and tried to be as ridiculous and entertaining as possible (wearing a darth vader helmet, my sweatshirt as a cape, and a paint stirrer as a sword), and managed to get out of my comfort zone several times because that was my teacher's motto: to get out of your comfort zone.

Trust me, if you force yourself to get out of your comfort zone then doing uncomfortable things become easier over time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
I use my negative nervous energy as positive adrenaline. I have always received A's for Drama. So dont give up, dont let your introverted nature get in the way of your performance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
620 Posts
No proper acting training but I've always been acting out little bits of films to myself and my joking around with people often consists of mock dramatic moments, farcical little scenes, I've always done it.

On celebrity types it says that Al Pacino, Daniel Day Lewis, Adrien Brody, Kate Blanchett, Michelle Pfiefer, Edward Norton and a few other people are INFJs, some real acting heavyweights there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,090 Posts
In one word: Yes.

In five words: Yes, like any other type.

In detail: I worked as an actress for years, and I think I was good at it (I was commercially successful, and the feedback was good as well). I found the industry very unhealthy for my artistic integrity though, so I now coach, and I'm glad I do. If it had been for the acting alone, I could have done for the rest of my life, I loved it. But if you make it your profession, you have to deal with the rest as well, and I personally found that hard.

No matter how I personally think about Myers Briggs when it comes to job choices (groan! 'nuff said): The fact that most INFJs are said to possess lot of empathy is a very, very good thing in terms of acting if you keep the boundaries clean. It can really help to inhabit a character.

As for stage fright: Yes, maybe at the start, but I lost that pretty quickly and turned it into good nervous energy. I also have to admit that it is often less painful to be someone else than yourself - maybe one reason why some INFJs actually feel drawn to it (if we believe the stereotyping that is).

Oh, and before I forget: If you are shy, acting training/acting is probably one of the best things you can do. It really helps to get over yourself and lose that awful self-consciousness. You can't act if you are conscious of yourself (as in: you're still yourself, not the character), or better: Your acting will be shit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Yes, I think one of the best things about acting is working with a cast that becomes your next family. It'd be so amazing to have a friendship like the casts of Friends or Psych or other long running series. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,090 Posts
Yes, I think one of the best things about acting is working with a cast that becomes your next family. It'd be so amazing to have a friendship like the casts of Friends or Psych or other long running series. :D
Hm, you occasionally strike up friendships with your fellow actors, but most of the time, it's like any other job. They're work colleagues - some of them you'll like, some of them you won't. If it's a TV series that runs for years, okay, but even so: That's closer to a 9 to 5 office job (yes, really), and like in an office, there will be people you get along with, but they don't necessarily become close friends because of that.

The difference to a 9 to 5 job is that you usually only meet them during production (which can only be a few weeks, months at best if we're not talking TV soaps), and afterwards, everyone has their own lives again. As I said, every so often, there might be a person you really click with, but it's also good to have friends who have nothing to do with all that stuff.

You also need some distance. It's very intense work, and depending on role and context, you can really take stuff home sometimes. It's not always healthy to then spend even more time with your fellow actors, but everyone approaches that differently. I always needed to snap myself out of it to stay sane, others prefer to stay in character.

All in all, I wouldn't see it too rose-tinted. It's a hard business to break into. For most actors, it doesn't pay well. It's emotionally draining if you don't have a thick skin. It's also fantastic and exciting, awkward and funny (e.g. having to do your first sex scene and stuff like that). It's a great job, but you need a hefty dose of realism, and it's really not as glamorous as some people would like to believe. Not for 99% of working actors anyway...
 
Joined
·
186 Posts
Oh, definitely. I have a rather dramatic streak, and am always pretending. I think we often have to "pretend" in order to communicate effectively with people. But I do think we would do well in rather intense parts, because we tend to be multi-faceted. Sometimes that can be difficult because directors just want a one-layer character.

...And now I've reminded myself of a Taco Bell advertisement.

If you're cut out for theatre, go for it! Some people are meant for it. You probably are. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Hm, you occasionally strike up friendships with your fellow actors, but most of the time, it's like any other job. They're work colleagues - some of them you'll like, some of them you won't. If it's a TV series that runs for years, okay, but even so: That's closer to a 9 to 5 office job (yes, really), and like in an office, there will be people you get along with, but they don't necessarily become close friends because of that.

The difference to a 9 to 5 job is that you usually only meet them during production (which can only be a few weeks, months at best if we're not talking TV soaps), and afterwards, everyone has their own lives again. As I said, every so often, there might be a person you really click with, but it's also good to have friends who have nothing to do with all that stuff.

You also need some distance. It's very intense work, and depending on role and context, you can really take stuff home sometimes. It's not always healthy to then spend even more time with your fellow actors, but everyone approaches that differently. I always needed to snap myself out of it to stay sane, others prefer to stay in character.

All in all, I wouldn't see it too rose-tinted. It's a hard business to break into. For most actors, it doesn't pay well. It's emotionally draining if you don't have a thick skin. It's also fantastic and exciting, awkward and funny (e.g. having to do your first sex scene and stuff like that). It's a great job, but you need a hefty dose of realism, and it's really not as glamorous as some people would like to believe. Not for 99% of working actors anyway...
I've read a lot about struggling actors, obviously that's also a facet of the job pretty well known by the general public. xP Often times I've heard, especially in competitive jobs like acting, that your love for what you do ends up one of the few things left to keep you going. (Sorry about the clique CX)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I agree about the intense characters. Antagonists have always been fascinating to portray and dissect their motives.

Perhaps that's the reason I never quite liked the thought of acting in the children's theatre...they always did Grimm's tales and they often portrayed the characters monotonously flat without venturing from the page. Though I probably shouldn't talk, considering how the last time I was in a 'real' production was when I was seven years old as a Queen of something. xP

Getting into characters' heads has always been easy for me, I think I'm ready to step out of my comfort zones;; all I need now is for school to start so I can join the drama club. X/ The Children's theater accepts kids from ages seven to seventeen from the whole town I live in, so I thought that it'd be a bit less challenging to get in within a secondary school limit. :p
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,928 Posts
I hope so; I've been taking acting classes for the past year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
538 Posts
I don't think I could... I hate everything Hollywood stands for and I probably could never remember that much dialouge. If I didn't respect or like the people around me, it would show all over me. I could NEVER do a love scene. Ever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,001 Posts
INFJs make the best actors, using there Ni and Ti to create and or understand a character and then using Fe and Se to portray them
Daniel Day Lewis has won 3 Oscars for best actor (That's 3 Oscars) for My left foot, There will be blood and Lincoln
He's INFJ 5w4
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top