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I don't even know where to start. I went to school for nursing not because I am a people person, but because the job security appealed to my inner need for stability. The years of schooling were hard, and there was nothing I like the more in depth I got to all my classes. I feel like I should've dropped out, but my parents would have thrown a fit. Just about the only thing I liked about my job working as a floor nurse was that I'm a part of a noble profession of caring for people who need my help, but everything else about the job was a bad fit for someone with my personality (I found out the hard way). I couldn't do it anymore. I told my higher ups that I felt that working on the floor with 6+ patients is not working out, I feel very stressed (I've been stressed for so long that I now have a very cynical and bitter voice in my head), and I feel like I cannot efficiently work in that kind of hospital environment. Now with less than 6 months of experience, it's hard to find another job elsewhere. What's hilarious to me (not) is how often I hear that there's always different jobs for people in nursing, but haha, jokes on you, that only applies if 1) you're an extrovert and/or 2) you have at least 1-2 years of experience.

So long story short, I'm still 'employed' but they haven't scheduled me to work anytime soon. I've talked with HR and they're trying to get me to shadow in different areas like clinical positions and home health, but let's be honest. HH already told me they would love to have me on, but they want me to get more experience (I don't really feel like HH is my thing. Due to me being one of the rarest personality types, growing up and making friends has been difficult, I'm an introvert through and through). I'm waiting to hear back from the other positions. Meanwhile, I'm trying to change my resume so it's not so medically-focused and more 'customer service' focused just so I can have some income if I can get hired to work at some of the stores around where I live. Anything seems easier than floor nursing at this point.

I hate sitting around the house feeling useless and like a failure. My parents needless to say don't understand my personality (they never have) and they feel like I threw away a perfectly great-paying job just because they think I feel like I 'don't have enough confidence or self-discipline'. If you're an INFP, and if you worked in a hospital as a nurse, you'd know it is crazy in there.

No one can understand how stressful nursing is or what it truly entails unless they actually try it out themselves.

Anyways, this is just a rant post. My mom is trying to get me to become a tax specialist so I can get into accounting (which seems boring to me). I don't know what to do with my life. I've already resigned myself to the reality that as an INFP, I may never have a career, just a job every few years. I used to love to draw and feel so inspired after watching something as simple as a commercial on TV. Ever since I went to nursing school and now have a job, I haven't had that spark of creativity to draw.

I'm thinking of getting a license to be a Certified Occupational Therapist Assistant, but my mom has been making me have doubts about it, saying things like, 'you have to have a lot of contact with people again and you already told me you don't like it'. I feel like I have to sacrifice one thing for another. Nursing offers no chance to be creative, which I've learned to deal with. But the monotonous and tedious task of charting like my license depends on it, plus the constant interruptions on my ascom phone, plus having to cater to so many people at once - it's a nightmare and even on my days off, I can't relax without thinking of how many days/hours/minutes left that I have before I have to go back to the chaos.
 

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That sounds rough! Maybe you should job shadow for an occupational therapist assistant or at least talk to some before you decide to get licensed in it. You might realize that it is nothing like nursing and you might like it. Or you might find out that it is no different than nursing.
I don't have much advice but I wanted to thank you for sharing this. My family always suggests nursing to me because it is in demand and stable. But There is no way I can do something like nursing. It is so demanding and draining for someone like me. Your experience only confirms my decision to stay out of it.
 

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Welcome to the forums.

Something my therapist told me was that "you aren't your degree". I recently got a masters in teaching (elementary focus), then bombed hard in my teaching position. I could bring up particular circumstances, both internal (the stress of the job forced me to realize I had mental issues to seek help with) and with my employer, but the main thing was that I was not ready for a classroom on my own. And this is my second career: I was in accounting for 5+ years and while yes, you have some alone time, the career made me feel hollow inside.

As LittleDreamer said, if you can job shadow (or even volunteer) as an Certified Occupational Therapist Assistant, that's great. My additional advice is don't gauge interest in jobs based on introversion/extroversion. When you find something that you're a) good at and b) passionate about, introversion won't be a barrier to entry.
 

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I don't know what country you live in but I don't think I'd throw away a decent job just like that. My advice is that you have to be sensible because you are playing with a lot here. I am not saying to just suck it up and sticking with nursing but you have to be careful because you soon find yourself with lots of degrees but unemployable.

If you didn't like the OTA the first time then what makes you think you'd like it the second or the third? I think you need to take time to work out what you really want to do. What is it that you feel like can't see yourself NOT doing in your life? Don't impulsively switch careers because that never works out, you will be career and degree hopping all your life. I don't see the point in you considering other career paths you don't like because you have already proven to yourself that you are not willing to do a job you don't like or you find tedious. You don't have that kind of discipline which is alright, that is not a bad thing. Everyone is different. Just play it smart because the capitalist world is unforgiving.
 
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I live in the USA, so my response is going to be as though you live here, too. From reading your OP I would think it most likely that you are an RN (with a remote possibility of LPN, but definitely more than a CNA). I have never worked in healthcare, but I worked alongside healthcare providers for about 4 years back in the late 80's.

I couldn't see myself as a nurse for a couple of reasons (mostly schedule and grossness of certain duties), but I would have no trouble charting. [I definitely couldn't handle working in a burn unit. One instance of debridement would probably send me to a psych ward for a month.] I have been involved in documenting in almost all of my jobs as an adult. I have had to interact with people at least as coworkers in all of my roles (never been self-employed, freelancer, or anything like that).

I do commiserate with you, however, in trying to pin down exactly what it is that I should be doing.

What would it take for you to make your living as a nurse in a different setting, i.e., not being a floor nurse in a hospital?

Are there any other settings in which nurses are employed that might be more to your liking (doctor's office, urgent care center, Ask a Nurse phone service, psych ward, school--from elementary to university, hospice and/or palliative, field emergency team--such as on helicopter response units, health department, etc.)?

What is difficult to replace should you decide to leave healthcare is that the goals and intentions of the employers are likely to align well with most core value systems (focused on doing good) and that as far as not-for-profit employment situations go, you should be able to make a comfortable wage (beyond a living wage). Many jobs on the market today don't pay living wages in my state, and the majority of companies that pay living wages typically have moral/ethical flaws regarding what they value and how they accomplish their goals.

A side thought: not knowing how well you draw and/or if you enjoy drawing realistically rather than artistically, you might consider medical illustrator. I'm not sure if an employer of such a role is found in your area. I don't even know if extra schooling would be required. It just presented itself as a possibility since you have medical training already and like to draw.
 
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I've never been a nurse but I can definitely relate to what you're going through. I'm a strong introvert as well and have had my share of "extroverted" jobs (teaching, HR, lots of receptionist jobs as a student) that left me completely drained and in a chronically awful mood. I can imagine how being a nurse in a hospital setting could be difficult for an introverted intuitive (or anyone else, for that matter) on multiple levels: constant contact with people; lots of interruptions; needing to perform detailed physical procedures very consistently, quickly and accurately, etc.

One thing I'm curious about is that although you say you don't like working with people, the alternative jobs you mentioned seem very people-centred, like customer service. I don't have any answers, but I would say that you might try to analyse what specific aspects of the job are the hardest for you (the types of interactions with people, the types of tasks, aspects of the environment, etc) and try to avoid those in the next job.

I also can't say what the job situation is where you are, but there should be some jobs that require little to no patient contact but for which a nursing background would still be an asset, e.g. handling paperwork or transcription tasks or writing for/editing a medical publication or website. Or perhaps you could work in an associated area like an organ donation programme, patient advocacy, etc. Maybe you could look online at a website for people in the nursing profession, or talk to the career development centre at your university for more ideas. The point is there are probably more options out there than you realise.

Don't worry too much about pleasing your parents either. They just want to see you happy and financially viable but you are the one who knows best for yourself how you can do that. Dedicate a certain amount of time to thinking/researching the job search and then really don't think about it and do something else. Concentrate on your artwork or get out with friends or exercise.
 
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